LumberJocks

using copper sheets in a wood project

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by grace123 posted 01-14-2017 01:41 AM 1476 views 1 time favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View grace123's profile

grace123

219 posts in 2602 days


01-14-2017 01:41 AM

I am wondering about using a roll of copper sheet I found in a drawer. It is 12×30 inches and it seems like I should be able to do something with it. This is my question: Can I attach the copper sheet to a piece of baltic birch plywood with some type of adhesive, and the use a scroll saw to cut two stacked pieces of wood and drop one piece into the other in a double bevel fashion. Then, if it is possible to do something like this, what type of finish will work with a combination of metal and wood? Thanks.


18 replies so far

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#1 posted 01-14-2017 02:03 AM

You need to use epoxy to glue the copper to the wood. After cutting and assembly of your project you can use polyurethane for a finish. You don’t want to use any water based glue or finish on the copper, unless you want it to turn with tarnish.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

299 posts in 683 days


#2 posted 01-17-2017 01:47 PM

You can space brass escutcheon pins evenly around the perimeter along with the adhesive. Rough up the glue side of the copper before applying the glue and clean it well. I think construction adhesive applied with a toothed spreader will work fine but you will have to test. Clamp or weight it down. I would still use the escutcheon pins in brass as it is both decorative and functional.

You can also give it a hammered finish by spending a bit of time tapping away with a light ball peen hammer. You will need a thicker coat of adhesive for that.

escutcheon pins:
https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=1943

working with copper:
http://www.quickshipmetals.com/copper-buyers-guide.html

Hammered finish bar top:
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/f9/3d/83/f93d83aaece4826b3914d156733a035e.jpg

In Europe it is fairly common to see zinc topped kitchen counters. Zinc bends easily with no spring back and it is easily soldered in the corners with the lead being the same color as the sheet. The copper can be soldered to zinc for a decorative back splash.

Note that the copper will oxidize turning darker and then turning green (like the Statue of Liberty).

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View grace123's profile

grace123

219 posts in 2602 days


#3 posted 01-17-2017 04:38 PM

Thank you for your replies. I will let you know how things go. I am not even sure what to attempt with this copper, but it was an unexpected find in a corner of “my” shop.

The building that currently houses my shop began life as a garage and was built 102 years ago. Then it was converted to an apartment during World War II. Then it became a photo studio about 30 years later. Then it became a storage building. Then it had a minor fire. When the repairs for the firm were completed, it became my woodworking shop.

So finding the copper sheet was a hidden surprise. I hope to do something creative with it.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8036 posts in 2416 days


#4 posted 01-17-2017 04:42 PM

http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2017/01/13/my-living-room-wall-part-2/

Gary Katz has a cool article on using copper.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#5 posted 01-17-2017 05:31 PM

Contact cement will work. I covered a rather large fire place with copper sheets back in 1998. Guess what…....it’s still there.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

1861 posts in 739 days


#6 posted 01-17-2017 06:00 PM

I’ve done a few metal jobs, I agree with contact cement. You can lacquer over the top also.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

299 posts in 683 days


#7 posted 01-17-2017 06:03 PM

The local diner added stailess steel sheathing over old architectural elements. But they used a too light gage material and it looks all wavy as a result.

Bonding to a backer board should enable you to achieve a flat appearance.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View Roger's profile

Roger

20874 posts in 2644 days


#8 posted 01-31-2017 12:35 AM

Wow Grace. I’m sorry I don’t have any input over your questions, but, I do appreciate your story here. Your shop has a lot of history I’m sure. Who knows what you may find concealed in there somewhere. Have fun. Work/Play safe.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3650 posts in 2249 days


#9 posted 01-31-2017 03:03 AM

I have used copper with contact cement and covered it with oil based poly, works well.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2784 days


#10 posted 01-31-2017 06:24 AM

During a remodel, I had to remove several hundred square feet of anti-UFO shielding from a JC Knighter’s farm house. I tried to figure out what to do with it and came up with this. To make them, I just used 1/8” Masonite for backer. I cut the copper about 3/4” larger than the Masonite, then laid it over the Masonite with the corners slit. Then I folded it so about 3/8” went over each edge on the back. I held it there with construction adhesive, hot glue, whatever was available.

For my project, mounting the “bricks” on a wall [with Liquid Nails] secured the backs even better.

Just for reference, to clean all that copper, I bought a gallon of the cheapest hot sauce I could find. In seconds, it cleaned the copper.

Once the copper was clean, I hit it with a propane torch, which gave it all manner of wild and wonderful colors.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2928 posts in 2949 days


#11 posted 02-01-2017 01:26 AM



During a remodel, I had to remove several hundred square feet of anti-UFO shielding from a JC Knighter s farm house. I tried to figure out what to do with it and came up with this. To make them, I just used 1/8” Masonite for backer. I cut the copper about 3/4” larger than the Masonite, then laid it over the Masonite with the corners slit. Then I folded it so about 3/8” went over each edge on the back. I held it there with construction adhesive, hot glue, whatever was available.

For my project, mounting the “bricks” on a wall [with Liquid Nails] secured the backs even better.

Just for reference, to clean all that copper, I bought a gallon of the cheapest hot sauce I could find. In seconds, it cleaned the copper.

Once the copper was clean, I hit it with a propane torch, which gave it all manner of wild and wonderful colors.

- Kelly

Very cool! That’s a ton of money in copper, right there.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3650 posts in 2249 days


#12 posted 02-01-2017 03:43 AM

anti UFO shielding. LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2784 days


#13 posted 02-01-2017 04:01 AM

Probably should have kept it, since it must have worked. After all, they were there to hire me.

[might have been Rainier lizards thought beams they were dealing with, either way, some kitchen, somewhere is shielded against them or UFO’s.


anti UFO shielding. LOL

- woodbutcherbynight


View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 742 days


#14 posted 02-01-2017 04:32 AM

copper is so rewarding to work with.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

618 posts in 748 days


#15 posted 02-01-2017 05:17 AM

I used copper flashing to adorn this picture frame made from an old barn beam I had laying around in my shop for a few years. Like Kelly above, before I nailed the copper to the frame I hit it with a propane torch to “age” and force the coloration of the material.

There are several other methods to patina copper such as using salt and ammonia and the results, though unpredictable, can be very effective.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com