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Forum topic by Andybb posted 01-12-2017 04:20 AM 532 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andybb

326 posts in 355 days


01-12-2017 04:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: veneer table saw

So I’m making some veneer for a project. Yes, I can re-saw and have in the past but…am I violating the unwritten rules of woodworking if I use a table saw? I can get consistent, clean, smooth 3/32 sheets from my table saw using a thin kerf blade on 3 1/2” slices. I know it is eating more waste than a band saw but by the time I cut them thicker on the band saw and sand them smooth it seems almost a push with a whole lot less labor. Will that send me to woodworking purgatory to cut 10,000 slices of veneer when I try to pass through the pearly gates? The actual difference between commercial veneer and the slices I cut from a hunk of reclaimed wood is stunning, even without the dark stain just using shellac.

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.


14 replies so far

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Planeman41

21 posts in 275 days


#1 posted 01-12-2017 04:49 PM

If your table saw is accurately set up as mine is, you can cut thin strips to a width of twice the height of your saw blade above the table by flipping the work end for end and making two passes. The secret is keeping the work solidly against the saw fence during the two passes. I made a spring loaded roller jig attached to the saw table that uses the roller to press the work against the fence. The roller is positioned just in front of the saw blade. If done right, I can get a final cut surface that has no evidence of being done in two passes.

I strongly advise using “push sticks” or any other method to keep your fingers well away from the blade. I have made various types of “push sticks” to do this when cutting thing strips.

Planeman

-- Always remember that that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Ron Aylor

1526 posts in 399 days


#2 posted 01-12-2017 05:42 PM

Of course you can use your table saw, but to answer you question … YES, like Sisyphus you are bound to hell!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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Andybb

326 posts in 355 days


#3 posted 01-12-2017 06:05 PM


I made a spring loaded roller jig attached to the saw table that uses the roller to press the work against the fence. The roller is positioned just in front of the saw blade. If done right, I can get a final cut surface that has no evidence of being done in two passes.
- Planeman41

I’ve done the flip, but never tried it for thin strips. Any pics of your spring loaded jig? Kinda like a featherboard with better pressure?


Of course you can use your table saw, but to answer you question … YES, like Sisyphus you are bound to hell!
- Ron Aylor

Damn! I knew it!

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.

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Ron Aylor

1526 posts in 399 days


#4 posted 01-12-2017 06:14 PM

” ... 10,000 slices of veneer … “

Do tell … what are you making?

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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Andybb

326 posts in 355 days


#5 posted 01-12-2017 06:33 PM



” ... 10,000 slices of veneer … ”

Do tell … what are you making?

- Ron Aylor


10K slices is just my penance for using the table saw instead of the band saw. :-)

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.

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Ron Aylor

1526 posts in 399 days


#6 posted 01-12-2017 06:44 PM

I see … should have read it more than once!

I am a hand tool junkie therefore resaw veneer by hand. The best I’ve been able to achieve so far is 3/16” thick. Good luck with your project … watch out for your fingers!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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Planeman41

21 posts in 275 days


#7 posted 01-12-2017 06:48 PM

”I’ve done the flip, but never tried it for thin strips. Any pics of your spring loaded jig? Kinda like a featherboard with better pressure?”

My jig is specially adapted for the sliding table on my Hammer K-3 12” blade table saw and, as presently configured, is probably not usable on your saw. I have some photos but I can’t get to them at the moment as I have gone through a recent computer going dead and I am still trying to get things back to normal with a new computer. This will take a little while as the dying computer messed up some things.

-- Always remember that that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Andybb

326 posts in 355 days


#8 posted 01-12-2017 06:59 PM


I see … should have read it more than once!

I am a hand tool junkie therefore resaw veneer by hand. The best I ve been able to achieve so far is 3/16” thick. Good luck with your project … watch out for your fingers!

- Ron Aylor


Thanks. Made one of these last year (without the magnets) and love it and use it all the time. Joint 2 sides and cut strips paper thin. Fingers never get near the blade. Otherwise I use the 1/8” gripper attachment.

Bought these a few months ago after a kickback to the rib cage.

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.

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shipwright

7681 posts in 2550 days


#9 posted 01-13-2017 01:51 AM

No problem. Bandsaw is faster and if set up well will give you a fair bit less waste but to do that you need to set up to cut evenly enough to need no cleanup.
It can be done. I just cut a bunch of 1/16” veneer x 3” to 5” wide.
If the tablesaw is working for you and you aren’t paying $150 per board foot (my tulipwood) go for it. There actually aren’t any rules that have afterlife consequences ,,,,,, honest.
The real difference between your veneer and commercial veneer is the thickness. Commercial veneer at ~1/42” just isn’t as nice to work with as the thick sawn stuff and of course it will sand through in a heartbeat.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Andybb

326 posts in 355 days


#10 posted 01-13-2017 02:25 AM


It can be done. I just cut a bunch of 1/16” veneer x 3” to 5” wide.
- shipwright

I’m just frustrated. 3 months ago when I set up my re-saw system adding a riser block using my cheapie HF bandsaw I got GREAT results (.5mm) even on spalted maple and had no drift to compensate for. The blade had to be replaced because it hit a hidden nail. Now I have drift and I just don’t seem to be able to reproduce those results.

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.

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Planeman41

21 posts in 275 days


#11 posted 01-13-2017 04:14 PM

Drift is caused by a slightly uneven set in the saw teeth. Either try another saw blade or do this:

Use a fine sharpening stone to lightly press up against each side of the saw blade while it makes a few complete revolutions while running. This evens out the “set” in the teeth.

Also, by removing most of the “set” this way you get a cleaner cut that requires less planing and finishing. The negative is the blade’s ability to saw curves is greatly lessened. Just dedicate this blade to re-sawing straight lines. You can also do this to hand saws for a cleaner smother cut.

Planeman

-- Always remember that that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Andybb

326 posts in 355 days


#12 posted 01-13-2017 08:48 PM



Drift is caused by a slightly uneven set in the saw teeth. Either try another saw blade or do this:

Use a fine sharpening stone to lightly press up against each side of the saw blade while it makes a few complete revolutions while running. This evens out the “set” in the teeth.

Also, by removing most of the “set” this way you get a cleaner cut that requires less planing and finishing. The negative is the blade s ability to saw curves is greatly lessened. Just dedicate this blade to re-sawing straight lines. You can also do this to hand saws for a cleaner smother cut.

Planeman

- Planeman41


Excellent! Thanks. Will give that a shot. I have 2 blades for re-sawing. A 3/4” and a 3/8”?.

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.

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shipwright

7681 posts in 2550 days


#13 posted 01-14-2017 02:21 AM

The drift is a function of the blade, not the saw. You can try the above procedure if you like but all you need to do is set up for the drift of the new blade. Every time you change blades you will need to reset for the drift of that blade. Once you do it will work as long as you use that blade.
There is no need to try to “fix” drift. All you need to do is adjust for it.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Andybb

326 posts in 355 days


#14 posted 01-14-2017 02:57 AM


The drift is a function of the blade, not the saw. You can try the above procedure if you like but all you need to do is set up for the drift of the new blade. Every time you change blades you will need to reset for the drift of that blade. Once you do it will work as long as you use that blade.
There is no need to try to “fix” drift. All you need to do is adjust for it.

- shipwright


Ahh! Thanks guys. Never heard it explained that way. For some reason I always assumed it was a function of the saw/wheel alignment/table.

I found an almost new version of my saw on CL for $50 today. The guy says he knows nothing about saws but it doesn’t “track right” so he doesn’t want it. :-) So….at the very least I can replace my broken table trunnions and the pot metal tensioner that now refuses to adjust after 2 rebuilds and have a motor for some other future project. Yeah, I know I should just buy a better saw but it used to work just fine. If not I’ll remove my riser and Carter guides someone gave me, sell em both and get the 14” Grizzly a friend has for $300.

Thanks.

-- Andy - Seattle - The best thing about being a pessimist is that you're either right or pleasantly surprised.

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