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Forum topic by Clk51212 posted 01-11-2017 11:35 PM 404 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Clk51212

34 posts in 355 days


01-11-2017 11:35 PM

Looking for new planer there’s one listed on craigslist looked at in excellent condition guy is asking 2000. Would rather have a powermatic then grizzly for about same price any thoughts also Manuel says it needs a 40amp circuit that sounds odd the jet unit with hh says 30amp


7 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5621 posts in 3495 days


#1 posted 01-26-2017 02:24 AM

What power requirements does this saw have? Can your shop match those requirements?

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3104 days


#2 posted 01-26-2017 04:25 AM

I am looking at the manual on the Powermatic site and both the 15S and 15HH show a recommendation for a 30 amp circuit. It also shows 30 amps in the spec section. The single phase PM209 shows 40 amps though.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1437 posts in 2850 days


#3 posted 01-26-2017 01:19 PM



I am looking at the manual on the Powermatic site and both the 15S and 15HH show a recommendation for a 30 amp circuit. It also shows 30 amps in the spec section. The single phase PM209 shows 40 amps though.

- AHuxley

Reason is the 209 is a 20” 5hp machine. In general 3hp will run on 30A circuit just fine 5hp will need the higher requirement.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4642 posts in 2276 days


#4 posted 01-26-2017 01:34 PM

I’m running all my 3 HP tools (including a 15” planer) on 20 amp circuits and have yet to trip a breaker. I have 2-5 HP tools that run on 30 amp circuits. There are several reasons most manufacturers suggest an oversized circuit, but generally most folks (I think) do it the same way I do.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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sawdustdad

269 posts in 668 days


#5 posted 01-26-2017 02:34 PM

I run two different 5hp planers on 30A 240V circuits. These are real 5hp motors, Baldor, not the fictitious “5hp developed” rated stuff (shop vac, etc.) And I’ve run them hard, planing full width 20 inch panels on the 20 inch planer, and heavy cuts with the 12 inch planer/molder.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

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msinc

88 posts in 286 days


#6 posted 01-27-2017 02:28 AM

Well, you can get away with a lesser amp rated circuit for two reasons, one is that they usually design in some overkill and two is because the start capacitors give a little delay. You really should only need the high amp draw on startup unless you are horsing the machine. I will say that it can sometimes be hard on the start capacitors when they operate just at trip amps, so it’s kind of not a good idea. It doesn’t just mean a change to a higher rated breaker either…you have to have the correct gauge wire running to the machine to support the amp load.

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KelleyCrafts

2537 posts in 522 days


#7 posted 01-27-2017 07:53 PM

I run the single phase 5hp PM209 on 30amp 240V just fine.

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