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T-Joint completely loose, need advise on how to fix it (pictures)

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Forum topic by DrTebi posted 08-28-2010 05:47 AM 2370 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DrTebi

256 posts in 2732 days


08-28-2010 05:47 AM

Topic tags/keywords: t-joint repair question teak refurbishing rustic

Hello fellow lumberjocks,

a few years ago I bought a wood-slab coffee table. While the wood (teak) is really beautiful, the craftsmanship is rather sloppy. Over time the t-join that was used at the base of the table became very loose, and the table just wiggles around like crazy.

I was wondering what your suggestions are on how to approach a repair on this. Obviously, wood is “missing”, so I need to come up with some way to add shims or something similar. But I also think that the whole base construction doesn’t make sense—the table should not just sit on the entire length of the two pieces, instead feet at the ends should be attached or routed into it.

The pictures below probably explain much better what I am talking about.

Thank you in advance for any suggestions!


7 replies so far

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2449 days


#1 posted 08-28-2010 11:40 AM

Since you have it apart I would glue in new wood on the cross piece and then recut the joint to fit snuggly and glue and screw in place. I would think any kind of wedging would only fail later on.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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DrTebi

256 posts in 2732 days


#2 posted 08-28-2010 12:29 PM

That’s a good point. I would have to replace the entire second piece, but this woud probably solve all kind of “fixings” and “shimmings” ...
I don’t have any teak, but it sounds better to go that route than to “shim things up”.

What about routing feet into this thing? In order to have it stand at four points rather than the two entire length of the cross pieces?

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8256 posts in 2894 days


#3 posted 08-28-2010 01:58 PM

Go for the feet. Use the teak (if you replace one member) for your stock. It’s already sized.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2449 days


#4 posted 08-28-2010 03:53 PM

You could do that, or get the screw on ones depending on where it would sit.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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Gene Howe

8256 posts in 2894 days


#5 posted 08-28-2010 11:41 PM

Screw ons???
Greg, doncha know, it’s more fun to rout them little squares ;-)

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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dusty2

321 posts in 2894 days


#6 posted 08-29-2010 08:02 PM

This cross coupling appears to be in a location where it cannot be seen when fully assembled. BUT, if it is or if you insist a trip to an exotic wood outlet might yield some small pieces of teak. I would enlarge the cutout seen in pictures 3 and 4 and then glue in that piece from the outlet you just found. Then cut a tight fitting dado and put it all back together.

-- Making Sawdust Safely

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DrTebi

256 posts in 2732 days


#7 posted 08-30-2010 12:15 PM

Thank you Dusty,

that sounds like the most reasonable solution. It might still be a good idea to just add some simple feet, even the “screw-on” type—small “knobs” maybe, so that it doesn’t scratch the floor when you drag the table.

OK, I will have to get started on this repair…

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