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Help me with making tool handles...

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Forum topic by RobH posted 01-21-2008 01:49 AM 6114 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RobH

465 posts in 4048 days


01-21-2008 01:49 AM

Hey all,

I need to make some handle for some old tools that were once my grand-father-in-law’s. Many of the tools are missing handles, some of them simply need to have a little better handle. I know how to turn the handle, it is getting the tool to stay in the handle that I am having a problem with.

Please help if you can.

Thanks in advance,
Rob Hix

-- -- Rob Hix, King George, VA


17 replies so far

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3987 days


#1 posted 01-21-2008 02:03 AM

That would depend on what kind of tool you wanted to put them on?

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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RobH

465 posts in 4048 days


#2 posted 01-21-2008 02:49 AM

Ok, I will clear it up a little bit. The main thing I have is old files. I also have a few chisels that I would like to re-handle, and I have a few turning tools that need re-handling.

Is this any better? How to is nice, but if you have online or book references, I will take those also.

-- -- Rob Hix, King George, VA

View MICHAEL CAMPASANO's profile

MICHAEL CAMPASANO

53 posts in 3797 days


#3 posted 01-21-2008 06:27 AM

Hi Rob, why bother to make the wooden handles when you can buy them on-line, type in wood handles for files in your browser, They are real inexpensive.Good luck on the other handles…...MIKE

-- never enough time in a day so use it well

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GaryK

10262 posts in 3987 days


#4 posted 01-21-2008 06:32 AM

Usually when I make handles I wrap the end, where I will insert the file, with wire to keep it from splitting.
Then I drill the hole and beat the file into it. I will wrap about 1” of wire

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 4298 days


#5 posted 01-21-2008 07:08 AM

I made some handles for my lathe chisels, and also my carving chisels.

I use copper or brass pipe for the ferrules, to help them stay on better I use epoxy.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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WhiskeyWaters

213 posts in 3804 days


#6 posted 01-21-2008 03:08 PM

I just beat on them until the handle sticks…course, I ain’t using my own personal heirloom tools to do that with now either.

Whiskey.

-- make it safe & keep the rubber side down.

View Jimthecarver's profile

Jimthecarver

1124 posts in 3784 days


#7 posted 01-21-2008 04:12 PM

Hi Rob,
I use high strength epoxy to keep my handles on the tools I make or refurbish and have had no problem with that method.
Jim

-- Can't never could do anything, to try is to advance.

View FrankA's profile

FrankA

139 posts in 3778 days


#8 posted 01-21-2008 08:58 PM

I really enjoy re-handling my old tools, even something as simple as an cheap old screwdriver
can be re-handled into an impressive item. I use a nice hardwood and use copper pipe for the ferrules.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2294/2173391428_f064a0d412_b.jpg

I think they turn out much nicer than any store bought handles

-- Frank Auge---Nichols NY----"My opinion is neither copyrighted nor trademarked, but it is price competitive."

View Tony's profile

Tony

986 posts in 4029 days


#9 posted 01-21-2008 09:08 PM

Your right, make your own handles, then they are unique to you and your craft.

I just step drill out the hole for the tang of the tool as close as possible, fill with epoxy and use a copper or brass ferule to help stop the wood from splitting around the hole where the tool meets the handle.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 4126 days


#10 posted 01-22-2008 01:08 AM

Hi Rob:

I like to use well dried hickory twigs and branches with the bark still on for my tool handles.
For file and rasps, I whittle the lead end and wrap with a band of wire or copper.
I drill a lead hole, then gently tap in the tang of the file.
I finish the handles with hand-rubbed tung oil.

I try to choose pieces of twigs that are ergonomic and fit my hands well.

For socket chisels, I whittle a taper then tap in the handle with a twig mallet.

-- 温故知新

View Sam Yerardi's profile

Sam Yerardi

244 posts in 3894 days


#11 posted 01-22-2008 07:34 PM

I use epoxy.

-- Sam

View mski's profile

mski

439 posts in 3979 days


#12 posted 01-25-2008 06:17 PM

Here’s a LJ project that might help.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/2412

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

View pyrogeography's profile

pyrogeography

1 post in 1763 days


#13 posted 07-27-2013 10:55 PM

old yard sale baseball bats are great for handlemaking. i use ash ones for hammer, hatchet, and garden fork handles. you can use a sharp hatchet to whittle them to a rough size, and then finish up with a block plane, rasp, or drawknife. for ferrule on file or chisel handles, i use short lengths of conduit or copper pipe.
http://zeekosalvage.wordpress.com/2013/04/15/tool-repair-and-the-louisville-slugger-garden-fork/

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 2037 days


#14 posted 07-27-2013 11:25 PM

If you’re talking about things like tanged chisels, then here is a good tutorial by James Thompson. He’s an Old-Tool guy and a machinist to boot:

http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/jthompson/restore/chiselhandles/tanghandle.asp

If you mean socket style chisels then here is another tutorial by the same guy:

http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/jthompson/restore/ChiselHandles/socketHandle1.asp

If you’re talking about drawknife handles or any other odd-shaped piece of metal you want to wrap some wood around, this blog series is a good start:

http://chairnotes.blogspot.com/2010/04/getting-handle-on-it.html

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

553 posts in 2997 days


#15 posted 07-27-2013 11:44 PM

Ok, this thread is only 6 1/4 years old. I guess old threads never fade away or die …

Here is the best description I have seen for socket chisels from Derek Cohen’s website:

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/Soyouwanttomakeadovetailchisel.html

Handle making starts about 1/2 way down. My first attempt at making a handle resulted in a 100% perfect fit. I only wish the rest of the handle was as perfect.

Greg

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

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