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Forum topic by Kurt T. Kneller posted 01-11-2017 02:38 AM 468 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kurt T. Kneller

107 posts in 869 days


01-11-2017 02:38 AM

Man, I am bumming.
I started to restore my grandfather’s old Union No. 6 handplane. I estimate it to be from the early 1900’s. I never had the honor to know him as he died in the mid 50’s about 10-13 years before I was born. He was quite the craftsman in his day. By trade he was a stone mason. Houses he had hand cut stones for are still standing in the Cleveland area. He was also a woodworker and I have the honor of owning his tools. To date, I have primarily used power tools and just started to assemble my own hand tools to start more traditional woodworking. I have already restored his block planes, some chisels and will do his mallet sometime soon.

Anyway, I have completely disassembled the Union plane, it is completely down to bare metal, sides and sole have been flattened, the mahogany knob and tote have been stripped, sanded, and burnished glass smooth. Its amazing how nice the tote and knob feel to the hand. Everything was going well, until….........I have bumped the table and the body hit the concrete floor. Talk about your heart dropping. I was expecting some serious dings, chips or possibly a crack. Upon first inspection everything looked fined. Then I took out my Woodpeckers precision straight edge and checked the sole. The toe is now bent upward significantly. I have not used any feelers to see how much, but it is more then I can correct by trying to flatten it again.

I guess I’ll just put it back together and set it in the shop for memory sake. I really wanted to make some shavings with thing.

-- Start with ten, end with ten.......


6 replies so far

View MaurerPower's profile

MaurerPower

19 posts in 155 days


#1 posted 01-11-2017 06:58 AM

I wonder if you heated the sole in the oven to somewhere around 300 degrees or so you could make the sole just a tad more mailable to the point where you could put the toe on a solid surface and give it a whack with a dead blow or something. This may not be the best idea, but it sounds good in my head. The heat will not do anything to the cast iron sole. Also, I know it wouldn’t be quite the same since it would not be your grandfather’s, but Ebay sells replacement soles for pretty cheap, at least for bailey planes.

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

392 posts in 1346 days


#2 posted 01-11-2017 11:43 AM

Being in the trade for over 40 years now, I have never heard of a number 6 that would bend by being dropped. If it has a deflection, I would suspect it had been there all along. If I were you I would finish the restore and if the problem with the casting is too much for you to work with, do as you suggest, just keep it around for a keepsake. Keep in mind, sometimes it is better to leave a tool in the condition it is, other than slight cleaning. The art in our work comes from being able to work with what you have and making it look good. Have fun, make some dust.

View Kurt T. Kneller's profile

Kurt T. Kneller

107 posts in 869 days


#3 posted 01-11-2017 01:09 PM

Could the deflection I am seeing be its natural unassembled state? I have read that when flattening the plane should be completely assembled due to the added tensions of all the components (which is how it was flattened). Right now it’s just the sole when I checked it with the straight edge. I was going to reassemble, mark the sole and take some strokes on 220 and check the evenness of the scratch patterns.


Being in the trade for over 40 years now, I have never heard of a number 6 that would bend by being dropped. If it has a deflection, I would suspect it had been there all along. If I were you I would finish the restore and if the problem with the casting is too much for you to work with, do as you suggest, just keep it around for a keepsake. Keep in mind, sometimes it is better to leave a tool in the condition it is, other than slight cleaning. The art in our work comes from being able to work with what you have and making it look good. Have fun, make some dust.

- Clarkie


-- Start with ten, end with ten.......

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4054 posts in 1998 days


#4 posted 01-11-2017 01:52 PM

I’m far from as knowledgeable about hand planes as most of these other guys, but I do have a friend that grinds planes flat and square. When grinding them,it is always the sole only. I’ve have several that he ground, and they haven’t shifted flatness in 5 years. So while I think there may be some small truth in your thoughts about it being assembled, I doubt it’s part of the problem. Can you use a feeler gauge to measure the deflection?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1943 posts in 644 days


#5 posted 01-11-2017 05:23 PM



Could the deflection I am seeing be its natural unassembled state? I have read that when flattening the plane should be completely assembled due to the added tensions of all the components (which is how it was flattened). Right now it s just the sole when I checked it with the straight edge. I was going to reassemble, mark the sole and take some strokes on 220 and check the evenness of the scratch patterns.

- Kurt T. Kneller

I have a feeling that’s the bulk of the issue. Putting the frog on and tightening it down can cause deformation in the sole for sure. If you put it back together and re-check, you just might find it’s still flat. Good Luck!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Don W's profile

Don W

18049 posts in 2073 days


#6 posted 01-12-2017 12:39 AM

It’s very unlikely bolting the frog will change the sole. A picture of the flex may help us give advice. How far back does the flex go.

I also agree it’s not likely the fall that caused it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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