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flattening large panels with a low-angle jointer plane

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Forum topic by JasonD posted 08-26-2010 08:49 PM 2845 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JasonD

180 posts in 2329 days


08-26-2010 08:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

I’m looking to buy a jointer plane to add to my small collection of planes (block, la block, #5 jack, and rabbet filister planes). I’ve had my eye on the LV la jointer, but didn’t know how it would fare when truing up a large, wide surface (like flattening a workbench, etc).

I apologize in advance if this is a “dumb question”, but my limited experience with la planes is using my little Stanley la block plane to true up end grain on small pieces. I understand that a high angle plane is better for difficult woods to reduce tear out, etc.

I’m more concerned with how well it would work in flattening a SYP workbench top. Any smoothing or cleaning up of tear out could be handled with the #4 smoother I plan to buy. My worry is that a la jointer plane will cause a LOT of tear out, but that’s only based on my ignorance; not based on anything I’ve read, etc.

The LV la jointer is attractive for a number of reasons. It’s almost half the price of the LN #7 jointer and it can be used on my shooting board (I currently use my regular Stanley #5 jack for that). If a la plane is suitable for flattening a bench top, then it’ll solve several problems and save me some money in the process.


6 replies so far

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3116 days


#1 posted 08-26-2010 08:59 PM

a jointer plane by itself will not create any tear outs – the blade setup will.

the nice thing about bevel up planes (and the LV LA jointer is one of them) is that you can change the angle of attach of the blade by resharpening the bevel to your needed angle. or better yet – have different blades with different angles on the bevel for different applications.

yes, the LV LA jointer is very suitable for flattening a workbench.

FYI. I recommend reading a good book about planes – it’ll makes a lot of things ‘click’. Garrett Hock’s “the handplane” book is fantastic!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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JasonD

180 posts in 2329 days


#2 posted 08-26-2010 09:06 PM

Thanks for the quick reply and for clearing that up, PurpLev! Sounds like my best bet is to get the LV LA jointer with a spare blade with a higher bevel.

You know the funny thing is that I bought Garrett’s book a month ago, but it’s sitting in a stack of about 6 books that I bought at the same time. I’m midway through reading the books in the stack (just finished Chris Schwarz’s workbench book). Guess I need to move Garrett’s book higher up the list and read it next. :)

Thanks again!

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swirt

2118 posts in 2440 days


#3 posted 08-26-2010 09:59 PM

“Sounds like my best bet is to get the LV LA jointer with a spare blade with a higher bevel.”
Or you can get a “normal” angle plane and hone a back bevel on it to get angles steeper than 45 degrees.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3116 days


#4 posted 08-26-2010 10:03 PM

Or you can get a “normal” angle plane and hone a back bevel on it to get angles steeper than 45 degree

yes – but you cannot sharpen that high angle plane to anything shallower than the 45.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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JasonD

180 posts in 2329 days


#5 posted 08-26-2010 10:36 PM

>>“Or you can get a “normal” angle plane and hone a back bevel on it to get angles steeper than 45 degrees.”

The problem with that is that the only quality “normal” angle jointer plane on the market is the LN with is $425 compared to the LV LA jointer for $260. Even with buying a second blade for the LV, I’d still save $100. Not to mention, I’d have 2-planes-in-one since I’d be able to use the LA blade on my shooting board and the higher-angle blade for truing up large panels.

I’ve seen people suggest getting an older Stanley jointer plane off of eBay, but I’ve been ripped off on eBay before years ago. So, I’m leery of getting anything from eBay these days.

View Ole's profile

Ole

67 posts in 2544 days


#6 posted 08-26-2010 11:00 PM

Lie-Nielsen has a pretty cool YouTube channel. Here’s a link to the first part of two videos on “large block planes”. The bevel up jointer is among these. I’m pretty sure they go over sharpening angles and all that during the course of the two videos. http://www.youtube.com/user/LieNielsen#p/u/29/q2_EgqLCv78

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