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Forum topic by Carloz posted 01-10-2017 02:33 AM 373 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carloz

380 posts in 164 days


01-10-2017 02:33 AM

I would benefit from a 1 1/2” or 2” nail gun but the idea of bringing one more larger gadged is no appealing to me so a compressor is out if the question. There are some electric nailers but reviews on shopping sites are not great.
Is it even worth considering ? I need it to attach a piece here and there so i do not need the ultimate performance but also do not want to buy something completely useless


9 replies so far

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Craftsman on the lake

2611 posts in 3010 days


#1 posted 01-10-2017 02:49 AM

I think air is the way to go… A small compressor like the 3 gallon craftsman is sufficient to run an large nail gun. I’ve used one for years.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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corelz125

206 posts in 548 days


#2 posted 01-10-2017 03:17 AM

Paslode guns work great no compressor needed

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ChefHDAN

858 posts in 2422 days


#3 posted 01-10-2017 03:06 PM

The Paslode guns and the ones requiring gas cartridges seem to be more expensive over time and the occasional use , seems to waste the life of a gas cartridge. The newer electric ones seem very nice the dewalt 20v brad nailer here would do exactly what you need but it’s $250 new. Personally I think you’d find that a Craigslist compressor and brad guns would give you much more use than a $250 single use tool

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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stillhave10

2 posts in 76 days


#4 posted 01-10-2017 03:24 PM

I own the dewalt cordless nailers and they are awesome!, I do remodeling work and use them on a regular basis. I got tired of running cords and hoses across finished surfaces and hauling around a compressor that was heavy and loud. The cordless work well for me and my uses.

When investigating new options I came across a system that used a coil hose with regular compressed air nailers and a small CO2 tank you could easily transport and carry on you. But you have to get the tanks filled, and when they get low, you lose performance. The tank also require testing after so long. Food for thought…http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2014/08/08/power-tank-c02-kits/

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jmalcolm001

12 posts in 324 days


#5 posted 01-10-2017 06:07 PM

It depends on what kind of nail gun you need, and how much you want to spend for the cordless convenience. You can buy a Ryobi cordless brad nailer for $130 (tool only), but if you need a cordless finish or framing gun, the prices go much higher. You can frequently find the Porter Cable small compressor/tank kit on sale for $200 and the kit includes a stapler, brad nailer and finish nailer. The PC compressor and 6 gal tank is probably less than 1 cubic yard in size (excluding guns).

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bigblockyeti

4004 posts in 1293 days


#6 posted 01-10-2017 07:53 PM

When you say electric nailer, are you referring to cordless electric or plug in electric? I’ve found the former keep getting better and the latter haven’t seen too much development in a long time and tend to leave the user disappointed unless nailing styrofoam to balsa.

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Carloz

380 posts in 164 days


#7 posted 01-11-2017 05:03 AM

When investigating new options I came across a system that used a coil hose with regular compressed air nailers and a small CO2 tank you could easily transport and carry on you. But you have to get the tanks filled, and when they get low, you lose performance. The tank also require testing after so long. Food for thought…http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2014/08/08/power-tank-c02-kits/

- stillhave10


Can I pump the tank with a bicycle pump? Before you start laughing once I got leaking tire on Tundra truck and pumped it every day for a few weeks untill I had a chance to have it fixed. In other words it is not a problem to pump anything to 120 or so psi.

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bigblockyeti

4004 posts in 1293 days


#8 posted 01-11-2017 01:50 PM

You could but would be doing so very frequently as most of the CO2 tanks are pressurized to well over 1000PSI and you’d be getting maybe 1/10 of the pressure you could if filled properly. You could be looking at as few as 1 or2 shots before having to pump it up again which alone would required sourcing fittings to allow you to even be able to.

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Carloz

380 posts in 164 days


#9 posted 01-11-2017 09:03 PM



You could but would be doing so very frequently as most of the CO2 tanks are pressurized to well over 1000PSI and you d be getting maybe 1/10 of the pressure you could if filled properly. You could be looking at as few as 1 or2 shots before having to pump it up again which alone would required sourcing fittings to allow you to even be able to.

- bigblockyeti


I am talking about regular few gallon tanks.

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