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Superior Sliding Bevel - Request for Information and Help

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Forum topic by Jerry posted 01-07-2017 07:45 PM 577 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

2450 posts in 1483 days


01-07-2017 07:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource question sliding bevel carving milling shaping finishing joining sanding

Okay, so the Superior Sliding Bevel, first engineered and produced by a Vermont native by the name of Isaiah J. Robinson around 1873.

Link Here

Robinson’s patent calls for an internal stationary wedge over which a chamfered bar rides, itself activated by a thumbscrew, to place pressure on the blade and keep it stationary. It’s a most elegant solution, but manufacturing it proved very costly as precision machining was needed to pull it off. Lucky for us, Robinson pursued his idea, and formed the St. Johnsbury Tool Co. (as a semi-subsidiary of the famed scales-maker, E.&T. Fairbanks & Co., of which Robinson was an employee), in St. Johnsbury, VT (of all places), around 1873. It’s here that he perfected the design of the tool, elevating it above and beyond a functional tool to a tool that many consider the most stunning bevel ever produced.”

You can still buy modern day knockoffs – for the princely sum of about $300. There are Canadian and Australian versions, still in the 300 to 500 dollar range.

I have decided to try to make one for myself, but can’t quite figure out the internal mechanism, so I’m asking the community for any information you might have about the mechanism, how it works, etc.

In return, I will fabricate Sketchup plans and make them available to everyone here.

Thanks in advance.

Jer

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/


10 replies so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

1488 posts in 1641 days


#1 posted 01-07-2017 08:04 PM

VeritasĀ® Sliding Bevels

This is what I have been using for years, works fantastic and built to last a lifetime, and very affordable!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Jerry

2450 posts in 1483 days


#2 posted 01-07-2017 08:08 PM



VeritasĀ® Sliding Bevels

This is what I have been using for years, works fantastic and built to last a lifetime, and very affordable!

- Andre

Thanks Andre, I did find them, but I’m sort of obsessed with this thing, If I can’t figure out how to make it, I’ll probably buy the Veritas.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Johnny7's profile

Johnny7

327 posts in 925 days


#3 posted 01-07-2017 09:13 PM

Jerry
Outwardly, it appears to use the same method as the Stanely/Eureka T-bevel.

I suggest checking out the patent drawings via Google patent
I have one marked PAT 141,081
Check out also PAT 893,223

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2890 posts in 1823 days


#4 posted 01-07-2017 10:15 PM

The patents for 893,223 and 710.178 both show some detail of how the mechanism works.

These are better than patents 136,714 and 104,206.

These are very interesting tools and required quite a bit of accuracy to make them. Some very clever people back then.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2450 posts in 1483 days


#5 posted 01-07-2017 11:11 PM



Jerry
Outwardly, it appears to use the same method as the Stanely/Eureka T-bevel.

I suggest checking out the patent drawings via Google patent
I have one marked PAT 141,081
Check out also PAT 893,223

- Johnny7


Thank you very much for this!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2450 posts in 1483 days


#6 posted 01-07-2017 11:12 PM


The patents for 893,223 and 710.178 both show some detail of how the mechanism works.

These are better than patents 136,714 and 104,206.

These are very interesting tools and required quite a bit of accuracy to make them. Some very clever people back then.

- Redoak49


Again, thanks for this input, it’s going to be very useful.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

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Johnny7

327 posts in 925 days


#7 posted 01-07-2017 11:13 PM

Patent 125,617 appears to be the actual, pertinent patent

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Jerry

2450 posts in 1483 days


#8 posted 01-07-2017 11:16 PM



Patent 125,617 appears to be the actual, pertinent patent

- Johnny7

Wow, this is great you guys, thanks so much.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

608 posts in 743 days


#9 posted 01-07-2017 11:28 PM

Geez. I wonder if Henry and Isaiah ever imagined that we’d be using our technology to marvel at their inventions 140 years after the fact. Kinda crazy.

BTW, is that a belt clip on the side of that thing?

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Johnny7

327 posts in 925 days


#10 posted 01-08-2017 12:11 AM

Jerry - glad to help

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