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Forum topic by SusanS posted 01-07-2017 12:30 AM 897 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SusanS

15 posts in 529 days


01-07-2017 12:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe cast iron rust jig

I recently acquired a 1948 Delta 1460 lathe. I am very happy about having this lathe. It did not come with any legs or stand. Originally, I was going to build a wooden stand, but then read a couple of articles online about the importance of having a heavy stand for vibration free woodturning. I saw a couple of plans for lathe stands that included using sand to add weight. I didn’t want to have sand, and am in a rush to get this on a stand, so I finally gave in to the idea of buying used cast iron legs for my lathe (I’m cheap and cast iron isn’t). On Craigslist, I was able to find 1 person who was selling legs that came from a Logan lathe. I believe I can use these legs as long as I put a wooden board on top of the legs before placing my lathe onto it. The legs are rusty a little bit, as you can see. Now, here is my question, finally.

Do I need to remove all the paint and rust, or can I just spray on 1 of those rust encapsulating primers?

The legs don’t have to look perfect, but I want to avoid unnecessary work and I want to ensure that the rust won’t be a problem for years to come. Thanks in advance for your feedback :-)

-- Susan in San Francisco


10 replies so far

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#1 posted 01-07-2017 12:40 AM

You want to get rid of the rust if you don’t want it coming back. At the very least, hit it with a wire wheel in a drill or angle grinder to get rid of all you can, then a wipe down with a dilute phosphoric acid solution before painting.

If they were mine, and I wanted them to last another 100 years, I’d strip ‘em down and re-paint with a good oil based enamel. I usually don’t use a primer on bare cast iron either.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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SusanS

15 posts in 529 days


#2 posted 01-07-2017 12:49 AM

Thanks Brad, and sorry about the missing pic. I just posted it now. Since you said you wouldn’t put primer on the cast iron, does that mean primer is only necessary for wood?

-- Susan in San Francisco

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SusanS

15 posts in 529 days


#3 posted 01-07-2017 12:56 AM

Also, if I were to use enamel paint, do you recommend I brush it on or spray? I don’t have a paint sprayer, but am willing to buy one, if necessary, since my jointer definitely needs to be restored. My lathe is in pretty good condition where it doesn’t have rust, but its paint is chipped/worn off in a bunch of places.

-- Susan in San Francisco

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#4 posted 01-07-2017 01:04 AM

It’s not that I wouldn’t use primer, just that I rarely do… in a couple of cases, I’ve found the paint more susceptible to being damaged when a primer is used. And for cast iron, brushing is fine… the surface is irregular and easier to hide any brush marks or imperfections. I’ve also found that straight out of the can is usually a bit too thick for a good flow out, so I will thin it about 10-20% with mineral spirits and it flows really nice, even brushing. Here is my 1949 Delta lathe that I restored, painting with a brush on all but the headstock/tailstock:

For larger, flat stuff like sheet metal panels, I prefer to spray though. One of those cheap $10 purple HVLP guns from HF works great.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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SusanS

15 posts in 529 days


#5 posted 01-07-2017 01:12 AM

Brad, I have lathe envy ;-)
Your lathe looks awesome.

So, for your headstock and tail, you sprayed the enamel on with 10-20% mineral spirits?

-- Susan in San Francisco

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#6 posted 01-07-2017 01:27 AM

LOL – I always thin enamel, and it’s basically required for spraying. For brush application, I usually do at least 10%, and for spraying, a lot more – probably something like 30% or even more. The head/tail stock paint was probably thinned by about 30% (I don’t remember exactly, it’s been quite a while since I did that one). Here is a South Bend that was painted with a brush only – no spraying except on the gear cover (which you can’t really see in the photo anyay):

I guess I should note that I don’t really have any fixed ratio for mixing… I’ll thin it to a rough ballpark ratio for what I’m doing, see how it flows, thin it some more if needed, rinse and repeat.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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OSB

147 posts in 365 days


#7 posted 01-07-2017 01:45 AM

I think it is a bit too cold to paint now unless you have a heated space to work in.

If you are close to the water, I suggest a full strip and repaint, humid salt air will attack anything not completely coated and may feed any existing rust under paint if you just encapsulate.

I’m not sure if Techshop has a spray booth in SF but they probably have a powder coating booth. A one month membership and powdercoat class might be worth the price.

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#8 posted 01-07-2017 02:01 AM

Nothing wrong with a sandblast and full re spray but if you want to get in business don’t over think it. Hit the rust with a wire brush and spray Rustoleum machine gray. You can find pics of lathes I’ve done in my blog linked in my signature.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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SusanS

15 posts in 529 days


#9 posted 01-08-2017 02:22 AM

Thanks to everyone for their feedback on rust removal and painting. Have any of you guys been successful in removing the logo tags prior to painting? Or do you guys just cover up the tag when painting? I want to take the tags off, but I tried removing a tag off an old Craftsman jointer I was parting out (to sell on ebay), and those rivets were not cooperating. I damn near destroyed the tag when I finally drilled the rivets. Grrr!

-- Susan in San Francisco

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#10 posted 01-08-2017 02:30 AM

Those are drive screws, not riviets:

The best way to get them out is to use a pin punch from behind. The holes they are in should go all the way through the casting… if not, alternatively you can cut a slot in the head with something like a dremel tool and cut off wheel, then unscrew them with a screwdriver. Another method is to get a really thin flat putty knife and slip it under the badge right next to the drive screw to pull it out a bit, then slip another one under the first to pull it out a bit more – eventually to where you have enough of it sticking out to get a pair of pliers on it and twist/pull it out. Method of last resort is to just grind off the head, remove the badge and grind the rest down flush. To re-apply, just drill new holes next to the old ones. You can’t easily drill them out as they are hardened. Replace with new drive screws, or most prefer to replace with small brass machine screws.

You could mask them off and paint around… but the end result will look like you masked them off and painted around them – not real pretty even if done really carefully.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Those drive screws are hardened metal, and it’s almost impossible to drill them out successfully… most of the time, you will just wind up ruining the badge in the process – as you may have already discovered :)

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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