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Forum topic by Ron Restorff posted 01-06-2017 06:14 PM 562 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ron Restorff

8 posts in 467 days


01-06-2017 06:14 PM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman tools

I would improve the Craftsman Brand by:

-- The best tool in my workshop is my #2 pencil with its eraser.


8 replies so far

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Ron Restorff

8 posts in 467 days


#1 posted 01-06-2017 06:15 PM

1 Rebuilding the Craftsmen Club with member exclusives that are real.
2. Improving open stock availability of hand tools.
3. Improving and marketing the web site where the manuals and parts lists are available.
-Ron Restorff

-- The best tool in my workshop is my #2 pencil with its eraser.

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Rich

1969 posts in 422 days


#2 posted 01-06-2017 06:52 PM

Return to the days of hand tools guaranteed for life and made in the USA. I don’t like to have to check the provenance of a set of wrenches before I buy them — I want to be able to trust that anything I buy under the Craftsman brand is made here. And don’t try to trick me with “assembled in the USA.”

Ron, I agree completely with you about the online manuals and parts lists. That should be true for all manufacturers. I don’t keep printed manuals anymore. I download the PDFs and store them in a box.com folder so they are accessible on all of my devices.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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TravisH

549 posts in 1768 days


#3 posted 01-06-2017 09:48 PM

I have never bought into the notion made in USA translating to quality based on historical past. It had more to do with culture/philosophy of manufacturing during that time period. Made in USA in today’s society does’t equate to quality either on many products. Americans have spoken for a long time we want cheap goods not quality (unfortunate).

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Rich

1969 posts in 422 days


#4 posted 01-07-2017 04:25 AM


I have never bought into the notion made in USA translating to quality based on historical past.
- TravisH

Maybe you’re too young to remember when America was great. I have a band saw made by the Atlas Press Company of Kalamazoo, Michigan that was manufactured in the early 1950s. Rock solid cast iron construction, and I’ve been cutting on it since 1963. I’m sure lots of other LJers have similar stories of tools they cherish from the Golden Era of American manufacturing.

I’d also ask you how you feel about the out-of-work Americans in the Rust Belt who lost their jobs to those cheap overseas knockoffs. They were proud of what they built. It was not their fault that the jobs were yanked from underneath them.

If you’re OK with cheap goods, fine, but when it comes to quality tools, I’ll pay the extra price. Like buying Lie-Nielsen over some junk imported from who knows where.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Rick_M

10598 posts in 2213 days


#5 posted 01-15-2017 06:05 AM

I go out of my way to buy American made goods when I can afford them but there is a lot of romanticizing about the past that hurts us more than helps. Lots of junk was made in America and I’ve owned some of it and a lot more of it ended up in landfills, so we see the good stuff that’s left and believe it was all good but that isn’t how it was. Also it wasn’t about America being great, it was that we were the only game in town. America and Germany were powerhouses of the industrial revolution, a few other European countries were distant second. WWI came and we knocked Germany out of the running, for awhile, and if anyone wanted something they pretty much had to have America make it. Then WWII set Germany and England back again and once again we were the top manufacturing dog. But we decided to rebuild Japan and make them an ally. Russia’s manufacturing was in full swing by this point and China was waking up. Then by the late 20th century the rest of the world had caught up and America was lamenting the good old days and looking for someone to take them back. Problem is we can’t go back unless we bomb the hell out of the rest of the world, again. America is stuck with a lot of folks in their twilight years pining away for a time that is never coming back and willing to sell out our future to any slick talker who will promise that it will.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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oldnovice

6419 posts in 3200 days


#6 posted 01-15-2017 07:03 AM

Well said Rick M!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1696 days


#7 posted 01-15-2017 12:22 PM



I go out of my way to buy American made goods when I can afford them but there is a lot of romanticizing about the past that hurts us more than helps. Lots of junk was made in America and I ve owned some of it and a lot more of it ended up in landfills, so we see the good stuff that s left and believe it was all good but that isn t how it was. Also it wasn t about America being great, it was that we were the only game in town. America and Germany were powerhouses of the industrial revolution, a few other European countries were distant second. WWI came and we knocked Germany out of the running, for awhile, and if anyone wanted something they pretty much had to have America make it. Then WWII set Germany and England back again and once again we were the top manufacturing dog. But we decided to rebuild Japan and make them an ally. Russia s manufacturing was in full swing by this point and China was waking up. Then by the late 20th century the rest of the world had caught up and America was lamenting the good old days and looking for someone to take them back. Problem is we can t go back unless we bomb the hell out of the rest of the world, again. America is stuck with a lot of folks in their twilight years pining away for a time that is never coming back and willing to sell out our future to any slick talker who will promise that it will.

- Rick M

YES!

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

View Ron Restorff's profile

Ron Restorff

8 posts in 467 days


#8 posted 03-21-2017 01:03 PM

For those of you who are interested in Craftsman Tools and are on Facebook I have started a page to protect the history of the brand. I am still building it, but there are some fun links there, with more to come. Here is the link:
Craftsman Tools, History & Archive
Please check it out, and like and follow if you are interested.

Craftsman has started a portal page for information about the sale. Here is the link:

thefutureofcraftsman.com

And if you are interested in what Stanley plans on doing with the brand, the give away quote was buried in an investor conference call, here is the quote from the ceo letting the cat out of the bag:

“And the channel he’ll mostly rely on to build those Craftsman sales is e-commerce, Loree says. Stanley expects to “partner with a large e-commerce company and make it available broadly through e-commerce,” he said on the conference call. “And we think that’s an exciting growth opportunity.” He added that an e-commerce company he has been in talks with has said “Craftsman power tools” is the most popular search term on its website for which it has had no matching products.”

-- The best tool in my workshop is my #2 pencil with its eraser.

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