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Forum topic by Raymond posted 08-23-2010 10:23 PM 1538 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raymond

676 posts in 2415 days


08-23-2010 10:23 PM

Well I still can’t decide what compressor to get. I like to spray, I use nailers, occasionaly a die grinder. Any suggestions of CFM. Do i get a stationary or portable. I like the idea of and oil compress compaired to the oilless. They are less noisy. 115 or 240 how many gallon tank. Oh my so much to think about. I am leaning to at least a 30 gallon stationary. What do you have in your shops?

-- Ray


12 replies so far

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dbhost

5386 posts in 1919 days


#1 posted 08-23-2010 11:08 PM

I am cheap. I have a smallish (8 gallon 2HP) HF oiled compressor, I run nailers, and every now and again a die grinder, impact wrench, and once in a blue moon a sprayer. I have to stop a lot to let the compressor catch up. Part of my choice was based on budget sure, but a bigger part was based on SPACE which I don’t have a lot to spare…

If I had the $$ to get the comrpessor I want, I would go with the 15 gallon 200 PSI model from DeWalt… I am still concerned with space, and fully understand the tank is a bit small, but I can stop, wait for a compressor to catch up, then move on… This compressor would just be a little bit less of a hit that way…

If space wasn’t an issue, I would go all out with an 8HP 80+ gallon behemoth. But let’s be honest here, space IS an issue…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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b2rtch

4341 posts in 1736 days


#2 posted 08-23-2010 11:29 PM

I have an harbor freight and I am very happy with it.
I use it for everything but painting, for painting I have a HVLP gun.
Mine looks like this one ( but red0 but it says that it is 3HP.
I have it for about 4 years and it runs great and never had a problem with it.
I paid $69.00 on sale for it.
It uses oil.

http://www.harborfreight.com/2-hp-4-gallon-115-psi-twin-tank-air-compressor-95498.html

-- Bert

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Steven H

1114 posts in 1747 days


#3 posted 08-24-2010 12:35 AM

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Gregn

1642 posts in 1671 days


#4 posted 08-24-2010 01:42 AM

I have a 6 HP 60 gallon oil compressor made by Puma with 12 cmf and been very happy with it. I went with it because it wasn’t much more than the 30 gallon model. The fact that I bought it locally saved me on shipping, the 30 gallon with shipping would have cost me the same amount of money. One of the things I like about it is it allows me to use my air drill and air sanders without kicking on so often. The one thing I did when I got mine was to remove the drain plug from the bottom and put a 90 elbow on with a nipple and then a ball cock valve to drain the moisture easily. Something I would recommend doing with any compressor, I even have one on my 8 gallon compressor. Also being a higher cmf it allows for me to buy a wider variety of air tools that run different cmfs.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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Raymond

676 posts in 2415 days


#5 posted 08-24-2010 05:02 PM

Thanks for the great advice. I am leaning to the largest CFM compressor that I can afford. The HVLP sprayer might be in my future as well. I have been looking at those for awhile now. Thanks again.

-- Ray

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dbhost

5386 posts in 1919 days


#6 posted 08-24-2010 05:36 PM

Okay I just looked at your shop, yeah, you have some space to work with… Now the next question is, what budget range can you afford? Industrial Air sold at Home Depot has a 60 gallon model that will drive just about anything you want to. You will have to rearrange your lathes a little bit to make room for it, but it may just be worth it…

If you plan on tucking a Compressor under a bench or something though, then you will want a hot dog type compressor…

The compressor you decide on is going to depend on 3 factors.

#1. Size / Capacity. How much air do you need to move? This will depend on your tools, and if you are willing to pause while the compressor cycles. #2. Physical size. This isn’t as critical in your shop as it is in many others, but it may be a concern for you… The smaller the compressor though, the less air you can move. My 8 gallon is a tad on the smallish side capacity wise, but it has yet to be a problem. It runs everything I ask of it, and I am not painting cars with it… #3. Cost. How much do you want to spend? Again this may or may not be an issue for you. I have noticed though that you have the HF band saw, 12×36 lathe, and dust collector, so obviously you are somewhat, frugal with your resources. HF does sell some decent compressors. Mine has been trouble free, and certainly chugs along through some pretty abusive use since I got it… Higher CFM would be nice yes… But it isn’t worth the steep premium cost wise to me…

There are spray guns on the market, notably sold by HF and Northern Tool that don’t gobble up too much CFM, and they do a nice job laying down finishes. Anything more, and I will get a turbine HVLP rig, or take my stuff to my BILs body shop to spray…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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Raymond

676 posts in 2415 days


#7 posted 08-24-2010 11:07 PM

I am trying to stay under 500.00 for the compressor. I just want the most bang for my buck. If I go with a larger CFM compressor I am looking at 220 volt which is not a problem, just another cost, wire and outlet. Course that opens up the possibility of a MIG and TIG welder.

-- Ray

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Raymond

676 posts in 2415 days


#8 posted 08-25-2010 03:46 PM

Thanks for the link. Who knew there were that many compressors on the market

-- Ray

View derosa's profile

derosa

1556 posts in 1523 days


#9 posted 08-25-2010 03:59 PM

I’ve got two, a huskey from HD that is oiled and is portable. It came with two nailers for cheaper then buying just the nailers. It’s been impressive, clicks on after driving about 10 nails but only runs for 10-12 seconds and isn’t that noisy. I’ve driven thousands of nails through it sheathing the inside and outside of the garage and nailing down 2” thick subflooring in a barn that will be used to store cars. I would have no problem and would like to buy one of the bigger versions that they sell that runs on 220v.

I also bought the 15g DeWalt compressor mentioned above and will be selling it this fall when I clean the garage. I didn’t realize it was oilless and it is noisy. I waits too long to run down before refilling and because of the high pressure it goes to it runs too long. The whole thing just wasn’t worth the money.
At work we use a giant Harbor Freight special. It’s about 10 years old and gets cleaned every 2 years which is how often the oil level gets checked. Being a bicycle shop with 3 mechanics and a free air hose outside the thing clicks on every half hour and has held up well.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

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docholladay

1286 posts in 1746 days


#10 posted 08-25-2010 07:14 PM

The rule of thumb is, that tools that require lots of CFM need a compressor that can deliver the CFM they need. I know that seems obvious. But there are other things to consider other than just the CFM capability of the compressor. First, tank size. A larger tank can supply more air without cycling than a compressor with a very small tank (this naturally also affects portability). Pipes & Hoses. You can have a compressor that can deliver tremendous CFM levels, but if you run that through a 1/4” pipe or hose, you won’t get that CFM to the tool where it can do the work. This becomes more important, the longer the pipe or hose. One cool thing is that you can essentially increase the size of the tank of your compressor, by using larger pipe for your air line runs in a fixed environment. Last, what type of tools. If you wish to run air sanders on a regular basis, you better design your system so that it can deliver lots of CFM for a long time. If you only occasionally use an impact wrench to rotate the tires on your wife’s sedan or possibly use a die grinder to sharpen a lawn mower blade, then you probably don’t need to worry about that too much. If you mostly use a brad nailer, then you don’t need much CFM at all, but the correct pressure is important. Last, if you plan to use your compressor for spraying finishes, you not only need the right CFM, but you better invest in a method to filter the air and control the moisture in the system. I recommend having a strategy for dealing with moisture anyway because your tools (any air powered tool) will last longer if you remove the moisture from the air. You could also incorporate methods to include lubrication in the system for your tools, except for finish sprayers. Obviously, you do not want oil contaminating your finishes. Personally, I have a compressor that I would call a compromise. I have a Champion twin cylinder pump with a 20 gallon tank. It is small enough to be somewhat portable, although the 220v power does limit that to some extent. It is large enough that I can run a die grinder for a little while without the compressor constantly cycling. I can run air nailers for 30 minutes to an hour without it cycling. I run a 1/2” ID hose (I haven’t installed permanent pipes yet) that does not restrict air flow too badly so that the air power get’s to the tools appropriately. Also, the twin cylinder (cast iron) pump (these are getting harder and harder to find) can deliver the same volume and pressure at half the RPM of a single cylinder compressor. This means less wear and tear on the motor and the cylinders. About the only maintenance it requires is to be sure and drain the moisture from the tank and to change the oil about once a year. However, I would not try to run an air sander (at least not on a regular basis) with this compressor. Besides, that twin cylinder pump looks sort of like the engine of a Harley sitting on top of that tank. How cool is that?

Here is a link that has useful information that can be useful in selecting a compressor.

http://www.jennyproductsinc.com/howtochoose.html

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

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Raymond

676 posts in 2415 days


#11 posted 08-25-2010 11:33 PM

Great information. I had thought of using larger supply lines to act as additional air storage. I would like some thing that can give me around 7+ CFM at 90 PSI.

I will be picking up something soon. Having to use a stick with a metal head on it is for the birds.

-- Ray

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Raymond

676 posts in 2415 days


#12 posted 08-31-2010 10:04 PM

I believe I have finally decided on my compressor. I looked at a bunch and the Sandborn at Menards 20 gallon, 6.3 cfm at 40 and and 5.3 cfm at 90. I think this will provide all the air I will need for most of the tools I will be running. At 359.99 its the same price as the little larger 30 gallon Harbor Freight, but the Sandborn has a 2 year warentee and is 115 volt. I would have had to run a 220 line for the HF which would have added to the cost. Any thing you think I have missed?

-- Ray

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