LumberJocks

Craftsman Pro 13" planer followed me home...for free

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by AAANDRRREW posted 01-05-2017 01:50 PM 1598 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1007 days


01-05-2017 01:50 PM

So,

A friend of mine got this planer in a package deal and never used it. He offered it to me for free, so I figured, why not?

Its model #351.217350

http://www.searspartsdirect.com/model-number/351217350/0247/0734000.html?searchType=modelSearch&q=351217350&searchTerm=351217350

I got it home, unit looks reasonibly clean, blades aren’t the worst, but there is a chip out of one of them. I manually rotated the unit to make sure it was free and it was. I plugged it in and she fired right up, but I think I have two potential issues:

1. I have absolutely no experience with planers, but this unit sure seems noisy free spinning – higher pitched squeel that goes away some as it speeds up. When it coasts down the noise gets a little louder. My hope is maybe just needs some lubrication on the chain/sprockets or at worst a set of new bearings. It wasn’t terrible shut it down now loud, but its there.

2. I think the drive for the rollers isn’t working. It doesn’t appear the rollers are moving when the unit is running. With the unit off there is resistance when turning them by hand, so it would seem at this point the sprockets/chain are intact and hopefully the gearbox is ok, which of course isn’t available anymore. Also, its possible the gearbox (which is a 2 speed unit) is stuck between gears.

I really have no idea how this unit was treated in its previous life – if it was babied or abused.

This weekend my intent is to get the panel off the side of the unit and inspect the roller drive train for damage and the like. I’ll try and post a video tonight as well of the unit running.

My final question – the parts diagram and owners manual isn’t overly useful for disassembly of the unit – I can likely fumble my way through it, but was curious if anyone has taken their cutting head out and replaced the bearings on a similar unit (I’m assuming there is a sister unit out there made by the same MFG that built this one). By the looks of the diagram the bearings (available and $6, high quality I bet…) are held in by keepers, so they likely aren’t pressed in.

I realize this unit isn’t a high precision feat of modern engineering, but hey, it was free and I don’t have a planer and always wanted one, so I’m willing to do a little TLC and see if I can’t get it working.


12 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1499 posts in 1222 days


#1 posted 01-05-2017 02:07 PM

Not sure if it is an identical design but here a tutorial and video for tearing down a similar planer to get the cutter and motor out to cannibalize it to build a 12” jointer. If you decide you cannot get the planer to work, you can always build yourself a jointer from the parts.

BTW, once you get the bearings out you can simply measure them and buy them from any place that sells them. There is often a code on them that tells you what type they are. They won’t be very expensive even for some high quality ones.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1007 days


#2 posted 01-05-2017 02:39 PM

That looks very very similar to mine. Mine has a fan mounted on the outboard side as well that is driven off the main motor.

In looking at the pics of that gearbox, I’d be surprised if it was damaged – more robust than I thought. Hopefully I’ll get lucky and it’ll be a slipped chain/broken sprocket or shear pin (if it has them) or maybe the gearbox isn’t engaged.

The reason why my buddy even mentioned he had this unit sitting around is I mentioned to him I have an old Craftsman jointer I got for free as well and needed a motor. However, the jointer calls for 1/3 or 1/2 HP – I thought I’d use this motor, but it’s 1.5 HP… Guess that little 4” jointer would mean business with that large of a motor behind it…

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1007 days


#3 posted 01-06-2017 02:16 AM

Well,
I had a few spare minutes today and found that the gear selector was all goofed up. It’s a large knob and has three positions – 11, 0 and 22 in that order. The knob was rotated about 180 degrees across from the 0 – so I think it was in neutral. I managed to get it where it should be, but it sure moved harder than I feel like it should. At any rate i was able to feed at both speeds and it seemed to loosen up the more I used it. So maybe a little corrosion is present and some lube will help.

I found a video online and think maybe I don’t have a noisy bearing now after hearing it. I planed a cedar 2×4 I had laying around and it did just fine, even with the old worn blades. I’m very happy. Next steps will be to clean it up, lube the parts and get the blades out and hopefully just turn them around. Otherwise I’ll get new ones. Which leads me to another question – do higher end manufacoters make blades that will fit this or am I stuck with the $70 craftsman ones? I have no idea how much the blades cost, but I’d like to get some midpriced good blades and I suspect the craftsman ones might not be the best.

Below is a video of it running.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1007 days


#4 posted 01-06-2017 02:17 AM

Forgot to link video.

https://youtu.be/fzNcUk2B3Ag

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3638 posts in 2243 days


#5 posted 01-06-2017 02:26 AM

Nice find, good that you have to work on it some, get to know the equipment.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1007 days


#6 posted 01-06-2017 02:33 AM

Agreed.
The manual is next to useless to explain it well. There is a lot of bells and whistles on this one and is an 1” bigger than the current one sears has for sale, so I’m guess this was a 300-500 unit. (Complete guess). I have my doubts how accurate the gadgets are, but I have a lot of learning to do.

For example, if I have a pine board from menards that isn’t perfectly straight, I could maybe use this right? I use my hand planer some when edge flying boards that aren’t perfectly straight and it works well.

Eventually I’d like to get some rough cut wood from the local yard because it is much cheaper than getting planed wood boards from menards or HD (or so I’m told).

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1499 posts in 1222 days


#7 posted 01-06-2017 04:18 AM

You really need to get one side flat to use a planer effectively to mill rough lumber. If you don’t have a flat side you end up just making a thinner board with same warping, cupping and twists unless the defects are very minor. A jointer is the best way to do that but you can obviously use a hand plane. Another option is to make a sled for the planer where you can use shims and wedges under the gaps to keep the board from rocking as it moves through the planer to level the top. Then you flip it over and mill the other side. You can find examples of planer sleds on LJ.

BTW, my Dewalt planer says you should only change the feed speed while it is running so you might want to check the manual to see if you are suppose to only switch the feed speed while it is running.

Also, it may be possible to sharpen the blades a couple of times before replacing them. Just make a jig similar to the Deulen or Quick Hone sharpening jigs. I’d be willing to bet you can find some examples on LJ. If you do need to replace them measure the exact length, width and thickness and find another set of blades with the same dimensions.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2647 days


#8 posted 01-06-2017 05:08 AM

I was thinking the same thing as Nathan with regards to the gearbox. It is counterintuitive to switch the gearbox while it’s running, but that’s how some models are. That fouls some people up with the Dewalt 735, but I’m not sure about the craftsman. Read the manual, rather than taking my word for it. Hope it is something simple.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1499 posts in 1222 days


#9 posted 01-06-2017 02:15 PM

I found the manual on the Sears website:
FEED RATE ADJUSTMENT
Refer to Figure 15.
• The planer has a 2-speed gearbox that feeds the workpiece
at 22 feet per minute (standard planing) and at
11 feet per minute (finish planing).
Finish planing a workpiece results in a better surface finish
than that obtained by planing at the higher speed.
• The knob for adjusting the feed rate is located on the left
side of the top of the rollercase.
NOTE: Only change feed rate while the machine is running.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1007 days


#10 posted 01-06-2017 02:49 PM

I did read the manual before touching anything and I did not move the speed knob with the unit off – I received it with the knob 180 deg out – I’m guessing since its a round knob that can spin 360, the 180 deg out of phase position gives the same speed…not sure why someone would do that though. But, its working now and I can change speeds, but it seems too hard to turn the knob yet. Since its work and not making any horrific noises, I’m hoping theres some surface rust on the shaft or its just dry as a bone.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

210 posts in 1007 days


#11 posted 01-08-2017 04:16 AM

Well, great news. I took the planer apart and lubed up the gearbox and chain/sprockets and the gear selector. It now moves very nicely. BUT the really weird part is my unit has a big red knob – it appears the manual shows something different, but its really hard to see. The weird part is when I select “11” the rollers actually move quicker than the “22” fpm… so I thinking the knob isn’t the original correct one, but no big deal.

I also was able to simply flip the knives around. The edges that were being used were actually sharp, but there was a couple good sized chips/chunks missing out of them. I ran a cedar 2×4 through it a couple times to play around and I realized I need to do some adjusting. The board would pinch some on the outfeed extension and there is an area on the infeed where a board won’t pass underneath in one spot but will in another – so some adjusting is in order I’m guessing.

Now – onto blades. All I did was google and search amazon, but my blades are 13 1/8” long, a hair larger than 5/8” deep and about 0.08” thick… All I found was Powertec that may fit (I cannot find blades for my exact model). I am not familiar at all with Powertec, are they decent? Is there another site I should check out? I plan on visiting Rockler in a few minutes.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1499 posts in 1222 days


#12 posted 01-08-2017 03:03 PM

It looks like they may still be available from sears parts direct, part number 22444.00, for about $72?

Also, if the blades are still sharp but knicked, you may be able to offset the blades slightly so that the knicks do not line up and continue to use them. Unless the knicks are really wide, it does take much of a shift so that they will give you nice smooth surfaces again.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com