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drill press advice needed

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Forum topic by Karda posted 01-05-2017 07:29 AM 571 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

381 posts in 157 days


01-05-2017 07:29 AM

Hi, i am new to woodworking so don’t know much about machinery. I want to get a inexpencive bench top drill press what should I look for and what should I avoid thaks Mike


23 replies so far

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OSB

147 posts in 129 days


#1 posted 01-05-2017 08:43 AM

One of the first things I look at is the low speed setting. I like to see about 170 rpm or lower.

I like to buy quality used tools over new budget tools. They will be heavier, run smoother and not suffer from sudden infant death and are usually less expensive. They won’t have laser aiming or many other bells and whistles but they get the job done.

Look for a nice table that is easy to adjust.

Look for a drill chuck that is nicely machined, if it looks like junk, it might be.

On a used machine grab the spindle and pull in all directions to see if you can feel any play. A tiny amount of play is OK but if it is sloppy, wait for the next one.

Turn it on and listen. A good drill press might have some rattle from the belt cover but excessive noise, grinding or squealing are possible bad signs.

Old American tools can be very good but there were budget American tools that are only slightly better than a budget import. My drill press is a Taiwanese model from the 80’s, better than almost any Chinese models and at $80 in 2013, well worth the price. The difference between Taiwanese and American is not enough to worry about, if I needed more it would have to be a bigger machine, a similar American would be a mostly lateral move.

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Karda

381 posts in 157 days


#2 posted 01-06-2017 12:01 AM

thanks for the advice, I have started looking around

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woodbutcherbynight

2914 posts in 2012 days


#3 posted 01-06-2017 02:36 AM

Look on craigslist and other outlets for a used one. Go in as low as you can and learn how it works, how to tinker with it if you will. Then when you are ready for the next step you know what you like and do not like. I still have and use my 1st drill press from 20 years ago. Keep it on low speed and use it to drill holes in metal or pilot starter holes.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Karda

381 posts in 157 days


#4 posted 01-06-2017 06:39 AM

HOWS EBAY, also when they refer to the inches 8” !0” what are they referring to, what horse motor is good

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mrg

714 posts in 2602 days


#5 posted 01-06-2017 10:56 AM

eBay can be good if you know exactly what your looking for and if the seller has some sort of guarantee.

The 8 inch, 10 inch refers to the swing. Circumference of a circle that would fit on the table touching the post with the bit in the center. Or easier to visualize divide that number in half, 8 / 2 = 4 so you have 4 inches from the post to center of spindle. Smallest I would go for is 10 on a bench top drill press. They are quite common.

-- mrg

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7418 posts in 2517 days


#6 posted 01-06-2017 01:15 PM

FWIW, I “put up with” my 10in. DP for well over 20yr, burning bits and making jigs for bigger jobs etc. I finally wised up and splurged on a 20in. Grizzly floor model DP and never looked back, other than to wonder why I didn’t buy a larger DP many years ago.

As for a benchtop model, how about looking at the Grizzly G7943 - 12 Speed Heavy-Duty Bench-Top Drill Press .
  • Number of speeds: 12 (140, 260, 320, 380, 480, 540, 980, 1160, 1510, 1650, 2180, 3050 RPM)

The above will be a lifetime DP, and well worth the price IMO. And it cost less than half of what my 20in. floor model did.

There is huge difference between ”just getting by with” and ”a joy to use.”
Food for thought…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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dday

85 posts in 1032 days


#7 posted 01-06-2017 02:01 PM

Make sure you take a look at WEN that is sold through HD. It’s big and beefy and affordable. Comes with a light and a laser. I’ve been very impressed with mine and have drilled thousands of holes in the time that I’ve had it.

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dhazelton

2506 posts in 1899 days


#8 posted 01-06-2017 02:44 PM

What you’ll get with a new machine over an older unit is a table you can crank up and probably more speed options but you can get older stuff for great prices. I have an old Delta floor press and a 1950s Craftsman bench top. I redid the quill bearings, chuck jaws and wiring on the Craftsman – if you can’t do occasional restoration work then buy new. Look for used brands Delta, Delta Homecraft, Craftsman, Walker Turner, Atlas….

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dhazelton

2506 posts in 1899 days


#9 posted 01-06-2017 02:44 PM

What you’ll get with a new machine over an older unit is a table you can crank up and probably more speed options but you can get older stuff for great prices. I have an old Delta floor press and a 1950s Craftsman bench top. I redid the quill bearings, chuck jaws and wiring on the Craftsman – if you can’t do occasional restoration work then buy new. Look for used brands Delta, Delta Homecraft, Craftsman, Walker Turner, Atlas….

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Ted78

282 posts in 1603 days


#10 posted 01-06-2017 03:05 PM

I’ll second the well made used tool over a cheap new one with gimmicky bells and whistles, BUT drill presses do wear out, perhaps more so than other tools so do check for excessive slop or mangles up chucks etc. While not ideal I am pretty happy with my cheap harbor freight benchtop. They kept it cheap by keeping it simple and not by using chinsy materials. Pros: cast iron table, good chuck, good motor, easy speed change, accurate. durable, price Cons: roughly machined table top, useless depth stop, table adjustment, while it works just fine, is time consuming, and it’s a benchtop, as one of my most used, and versatile tools drilling, sanding, grinding, wire brushing, lining up taps…I think a full size floor model would be nice to have.

-- Ted

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Lazyman

1127 posts in 990 days


#11 posted 01-06-2017 03:06 PM

Buying a drill press through eBay may have too high of a shipping cost to be a good deal unless it turns out to be a local seller. On a used tool, I personally would want to check it out first anyway.

One thing to check on a used DP is runout in the spindle. Take a drill bit with you that you know is perfectly straight, the longer the better. A brad point bit might be even better if you have one (if not you will want some). Then put it into the drill and turn it on and look closely at the spinning tip. The tip should not look like it is dancing around in a circle or wobbling. It is tough to drill a hole precisely if you have a hard time getting the bit to start at the right point. A very small amount of wobble you can live with but you might be able to use that to get a lower price.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Planeman41

21 posts in 126 days


#12 posted 01-06-2017 03:16 PM

I’m an old timer that has been using a drill press I bought in 1958 that has served me well. After 60 years of drill press using these are the things mine has on it that I could not do without.

Quill lock – locks the quill that holds the chuck in any up/down position. Helps with set ups, routing, drum sanding. Not seen on many big box store drill presses.

Depth stop – for drilling repeat holes of a particular depth.

Table lift – this is a MUST! Moving the heavy cast iron table up and down is a major pain. My old drill press did not have this on it. I improvised by modifying a trailer jack from Harbor Freight. Life is much easier now.

Planeman

-- Always remember that that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View DavidTTU's profile (online now)

DavidTTU

136 posts in 1238 days


#13 posted 01-06-2017 03:48 PM

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Oscillating-Drill-Press/W1668

Anyone have any experience with an oscillating drill press? Is this a feature you would be after?

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Lazyman

1127 posts in 990 days


#14 posted 01-06-2017 04:03 PM

That is the drill press that I have and I do use the oscillating feature fairly regularly. This is a good way to get 2 tools in 1, though some day I would rather have a dedicated oscillating sander. It has a shopvac connection that sucks about 90% of the sanding dust away. I bought mine off Craig’s List. It was practically new and I got it for almost $100 less than retail. BTW the Shopfox brand is Grizzly’s “retail” brand so you may be able to get it locally and not pay shipping on it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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PaulHWood

363 posts in 1856 days


#15 posted 01-06-2017 04:12 PM

I was always told not to use your drill press as a sander as it will get your drill press out of alignment.

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

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