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Forum topic by Alongiron posted 01-05-2017 02:01 AM 1024 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Alongiron

637 posts in 2528 days


01-05-2017 02:01 AM

So One of my Christmas presents was a pair of woodworking

gloves. I give them a try and love them! No more splinters, they help with gripping the wood, I love them. What are your thoughts?

-- Measure twice and cut once.....sneak up on it! Steve Lien


35 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

7520 posts in 1985 days


#1 posted 01-05-2017 02:13 AM

No gloves around any sort of machinery for me.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27057 posts in 2173 days


#2 posted 01-05-2017 02:15 AM

Never around the machines. However, I use the same ones for handling the lumber.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View clin's profile

clin

751 posts in 831 days


#3 posted 01-05-2017 02:21 AM

There’s a debate about gloves and machines. It’s generally accepted that gloves are a safety hazard because machines can grab them more easily and pull your hand into the machine. Of course, if they give you a better grip, and therefore better control, you may very well be safer.

I wear them only when needed. For example, when I was cutting a lot of pre-finished plywood. The fresh cuts were nearly razor sharp and it was real easy to get splinters from the thin veneer. I’d also wear them if I were handling something I was likely to get splinters from. I’m just extra careful.

FYI, there is one machine you NEVER want to wear gloves using, the drill press. Reading up on OSHA about gloves and accidents, 90+% involved drill presses and as they put it “traumatic amputation” which I read as pulled their fingers off.

-- Clin

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

450 posts in 2793 days


#4 posted 01-05-2017 02:24 AM

Under normal circumstances I don’t wear gloves lest I get dragged into a blade or bit, but in Michigan this time of year it’s well-digger’s ass cold outdoors and so I wear the Craftsman version all of the time.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3391 posts in 3731 days


#5 posted 01-05-2017 02:29 AM

I agree with jmartel – no gloves around machinery. I use gloves to handle rough lumber but that’s about it. If you get the glove even a smudge too close to the blade/bit – it will get pulled into said blade/bit. If you are extremely lucky the glove will pull right off your hand, but in all likelihood the hand will be pulled into the blade/bit.

Now this is only a guess on my part – but I don’t even think a saw stop would help if you got a glove pulled into the blade. By the time your finger touches the blade you’ve probably already been hurt pretty badly just from the pull of the blade.

One last thought – if you are going to use gloves around machinery make sure the gloves are skin tight and not “roomy”. An ill fitting glove does not allow you the “feel” of the machine and secondly an ill fitting glove that is longer than your fingers will be more likely to be pulled into the machine.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

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Aj2

1174 posts in 1633 days


#6 posted 01-05-2017 02:37 AM

I wear gloves when handling Rough Dougfir.The splinters almost alway get infected for me.And so darn hard to see.
I heard leather is safer than fabric something about it not as grabby and won’t feed your hand into a blade.
But I don’t know if it’s true since I don’t let my hand go there.

Aj

-- Aj

View mikethetermite's profile

mikethetermite

589 posts in 3101 days


#7 posted 01-05-2017 03:34 AM

No gloves around machinery ever.

-- Mike The Termite ~~~~~ Working safely may get old, but so do those who practice it.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1005 posts in 1830 days


#8 posted 01-05-2017 03:42 AM

Our work takes it one step further and says no long sleeves around machinery either. We had a guy almost pulled in to his lathe by his jacket sleeve. It ripped away at the last second. Lucky he did’t die.

IMO, around a saw the risk is slightly lower since it is designed to cut what touches it, but it is still a risk that a thread gets around the arbor and then you are done for.

Gloves are a big concern around them because they take your feel away.

But wearing then for wood handling, chisel work, hand planing, etcs…GREAT idea. I should look in to a pair.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View BulldogLouisiana's profile

BulldogLouisiana

325 posts in 975 days


#9 posted 01-05-2017 04:12 AM



I agree with jmartel – no gloves around machinery. I use gloves to handle rough lumber but that s about it. If you get the glove even a smudge too close to the blade/bit – it will get pulled into said blade/bit. If you are extremely lucky the glove will pull right off your hand, but in all likelihood the hand will be pulled into the blade/bit.

Now this is only a guess on my part – but I don t even think a saw stop would help if you got a glove pulled into the blade. By the time your finger touches the blade you ve probably already been hurt pretty badly just from the pull of the blade.

One last thought – if you are going to use gloves around machinery make sure the gloves are skin tight and not “roomy”. An ill fitting glove does not allow you the “feel” of the machine and secondly an ill fitting glove that is longer than your fingers will be more likely to be pulled into the machine.

- Betsy

I read about this on another forum, but a lifelong carpenter used to complain about there never being a Sawstop demo with gloves. He claimed that in his construction business, guys were gonna where gloves. He finally talked a Sawstop dealer into doing a demo with a gloved hotdog. The saw worked flawlessly, and I believe he purchased one.

-- There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who don't.

View BulldogLouisiana's profile

BulldogLouisiana

325 posts in 975 days


#10 posted 01-05-2017 04:13 AM

Argh. iPad.

-- There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who don't.

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

551 posts in 1770 days


#11 posted 01-05-2017 05:09 AM

I don’t wear gloves buy have seen several experienced turners use finger less gloves to protect their lead hand. Usually modified batting gloves or golfing gloves so skin tight fit.

They do seam to market Skins gloves for woodworking use. Sort of surprising in a way.

http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/Skins-Gloves-28p9941.htm#!prettyPhoto/8/

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 404 days


#12 posted 01-05-2017 05:26 AM

I worked with gloves on around hot machinery and at home for 30+ years, they savee many a cut/stitches, just make sure they are tight on your fingers and no loose cuffs.
Felt the cut on the glove b4 my skin.

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 404 days


#13 posted 01-05-2017 05:30 AM

I wear a pair with the plastic nobbies on them when routeing on on my router table, holds the wood piece real well.

View torea's profile

torea

23 posts in 705 days


#14 posted 01-05-2017 05:52 AM

I keep gloves in my tool apron, but like a lot have said, I never wear them when around machines. I used to work in a hardware store where we’d make saw cuts and I made it a ritual to take off my gloves as I put on my glasses and hearing protection. That was a good habit to get into.

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 404 days


#15 posted 01-05-2017 06:41 AM

Document why wearing tight fitting gloves around rotating machinery is bad.

showing 1 through 15 of 35 replies

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