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Need Help Understanding Used Jointer Inspection Process

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Forum topic by RubberDuc posted 01-04-2017 12:59 AM 385 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RubberDuc

45 posts in 428 days


01-04-2017 12:59 AM

Hey All,

Thanks to so many of you that have helped me in my search for a jointer. The main theme I kept seeing over and over was to check the used jointer for coplanar and flatness, but I had a question. So if the tables are out of coplanar why would you walk away from the deal? The reason I ask is in the below video on setting up a jointer (new Powermatic) the tables were way out of alignment. So I just wasn’t sure why that was a deal breaker on a used jointer, or do I have it wrong and it isn’t? Looking at this video it seems like a very long process to get it right so much so that I doubt you could do it during the inspection process which is why I ask. I could be wrong in my thinking so I wanted to ask:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gO746cuRqV4

Anyway thanks for any guidance.


4 replies so far

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MrUnix

6325 posts in 2101 days


#1 posted 01-04-2017 01:13 AM

Some people want plug-n-play. Others don’t mind tinkering. I’m the later, and usually am buying a machine to restore – so I don’t really worry about it not being co-planer, or running, or surface rust, or condition of knives, belts or bearings (and those can help you negotiate a lower price). All of that stuff can be fixed. The most important for me is being complete, as it’s the missing bits that can really bite you in the wallet. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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RubberDuc

45 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 01-04-2017 02:39 AM



Some people want plug-n-play. Others don t mind tinkering. I m the later, and usually am buying a machine to restore – so I don t really worry about it not being co-planer, or running, or surface rust, or condition of knives, belts or bearings (and those can help you negotiate a lower price). All of that stuff can be fixed. The most important for me is being complete, as it s the missing bits that can really bite you in the wallet. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Hi Brad,

Thanks, that is kind of my thoughts exactly and I’m glad you said that. The Boice / Crane machine didn’t happen so I’m buying the Powermatic Model 50 hopefully tomorrow (bit of a haul unfortunately). I just worried about the coplanar part until I thought “why worry if I can adjust it like it this video”. Guess the only deal breaker would be flatness then right?

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Aj2

1270 posts in 1700 days


#3 posted 01-04-2017 04:35 AM

If you have never owned a jointer your better off buying a machine that doesn’t need tuning.Not all jointers are adjustable like the one in Marc’s video.
Tuning a jointer can be just as frustrating as learning to use one.

Aj

-- Aj

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RubberDuc

45 posts in 428 days


#4 posted 01-04-2017 04:38 AM



If you have never owned a jointer your better off buying a machine that doesn t need tuning.Not all jointers are adjustable like the one in Marc s video.
Tuning a jointer can be just as frustrating as learning to use one.

Aj

- Aj2

I’ve owned one before, but it was a NIB delta shopmaster not vintage iron. With that said, I’m very mechanically inclined and have worked on cars since I was a child so I think this would be pretty straight forward…hopefully :D Does anyone know if the old PM model 50 is fairly easy to adjust?

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