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Stanley No 80 identification

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Forum topic by thcyclist posted 01-02-2017 09:38 PM 1112 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thcyclist

13 posts in 386 days


01-02-2017 09:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: stanley no 80 scraper stanley 80 cabinet scraper etch restore

Hoi

I just got a decent looking #80 and was wondering what the age-range was on this thing, and if all the parts are original. Here are some pictures:

 photo DSC_0131_zps3cxljzhf.jpg

 photo DSC_0132_zpsokjvtroe.jpg

 photo 6ed80090-1cab-4e9b-b8c4-fb8ad81985df_zpsdb4jihw1.jpg

I can just about make out some diamond shape on the iron and perhaps some letters, the other side of the blade also seems to have some writing on it. Whether that’s just pareidolia or there really is something there is a big question.

Are there ways to bring any possible etching more in view? Before I go ahead and lap it all to a shine

The holding plate doesn’t look original, am I correct?

click through for full size versions.

This was purchased in the Netherlands, so that may impact the possible blade replacement. I’m hoping someone recognizes the shape and can post a picture of a good logo so I can compare.

Thanks for any help.


16 replies so far

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Johnny7

327 posts in 925 days


#1 posted 01-02-2017 11:24 PM

I don’t believe your clamping plate is original—every one I’ve owned or seen has a nearly circular radius surrounding the through-holes.
Moreover, that plate is often the key to narrowing down the range on these things, as they are typically branded. Here for instance is one of mine.

Finally, to have a peek at any possible etching on the blade, use a single-edge razor blade, held at a low angle to “shave” off any surface rust or oxidation.

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Marn64

295 posts in 620 days


#2 posted 01-04-2017 03:07 AM


I don t believe your clamping plate is original—every one I ve owned or seen has a nearly circular radius surrounding the through-holes.
Moreover, that plate is often the key to narrowing down the range on these things, as they are typically branded. Here for instance is one of mine.

Finally, to have a peek at any possible etching on the blade, use a single-edge razor blade, held at a low angle to “shave” off any surface rust or oxidation.

- Johnny7


I would like to respectfully disagree with that statement that the clamping plate isn’t original, look at mine that is the same type study as the poster. The ones with the B mark on the castings are pre sweetheart era.

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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Johnny7

327 posts in 925 days


#3 posted 01-04-2017 05:10 AM

Benjamin
This is something we may well never get to the bottom of, but let me make a few observations:
I have had about 20-25 of these pass through my hands over the years and have never had a Stanley with an unmarked retention plate. On the other hand, I have had many with (obviously) home-made plates.
For some reason, many of these go missing.

Any chance that yours have been installed “backwards”, such that there is a logo on the reverse?

Lastly, here are a few images of pre-sweetheart-era retention plates:

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bandit571

18610 posts in 2518 days


#4 posted 01-04-2017 05:26 AM

Hmmm…

Had one a few years ago…with the triangle logo..

But, the front of the sole was squared off..

So..I guess this was a pre-SW era #80?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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thcyclist

13 posts in 386 days


#5 posted 01-04-2017 05:23 PM

Is there no clue in the shape of the Stanley name? There is no rounded line in the versions presented here:

https://www.antique-used-tools.com/stantms.htm

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bandit571

18610 posts in 2518 days


#6 posted 01-04-2017 05:29 PM

The “B” mark is from the Foundry Stanley used to make their castings at. I seem to remember they also used a “S” foundry before that. Might follow that trail, and see when it might have been cast?

The squared off front came before the rounded front ones. So, you might also try that. There was also a #80 M, as that one used a Malleable Iron in the casting.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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onoitsmatt

367 posts in 1011 days


#7 posted 01-04-2017 06:08 PM

FWIW, I have an identical No. 80 to the one The Cyclist has posted. Same B casting and no markings on the clamping plate, and the shape is the same (very slightly rounded edges on both sides). Seems unlikely two Stanley 80’s in two different countries would have identical clamping plates and not be original.

Having said all that, I have no idea what vintage this scraper is.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

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Texcaster

1262 posts in 1508 days


#8 posted 01-04-2017 09:34 PM

It’s the pattern of the sole that interests me. I needed that pattern to smooth lumps, bumps, and tool marks on instrument necks. I had no idea this scraper existed, so I modified mine. I had to replace it with a Kunz knock off. My modification is a little more extreme than the pictured one to get as close as possible to the heel and head stock. Also pictured is a 151 spokeshave ground double convex. The 151 is still more useful to me than the Veritas because the throat opening is much larger for rough work and the handles are high enough to allow work on the hollow side of archtop instruments.

edit: I just noticed the curve is on the trailing side.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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thcyclist

13 posts in 386 days


#9 posted 01-05-2017 08:49 AM

Pursuing the B foundry clue:

According to http://tooltrip.com/tooltrip9/stanley/stan-bpl/bailey-types.htm :


Type 7. Planes made by Stanley 1893-1899.

All of the features of the previous, except:
Most examples have the letter “S” cast into the frog, lever cap, and/or bed. This is likely the mark of the Sessions Foundry, who contracted with Stanley to produce their castings.

Type 8. Planes made by Stanley 1899-1902.

All of the features of the previous, except:
“S” casting marks eliminated, and replaced with “B”, another foundry mark.

Type 9. Planes made by Stanley 1902-1907.

All of the features of the previous, except:
“B” casting marks eliminated.

The page refers to the big planes of course, so it may not be a perfect match.

http://www.hansbrunnertools.com/Stanley%20by%20numbers/A-Z.htm says:


B casting
Stanley used many different foundry / casting marks, the most famous ones are B and S. Those marks were used by sub-contracting foundries. If you follow Smith, S castings were used between 1893 and 1899 , replaced by B castings 1899-1902. For bench planes the often quoted early B casting really should be replaced by early S casting followed by a short period of B castings. However, this might be the case for bench planes, special purpose planes and block planes didn’t follow the same pattern.

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thcyclist

13 posts in 386 days


#10 posted 01-05-2017 08:58 AM

I’m having difficulty finding the rounded logo

 photo bff0fc42-d0aa-4ce9-a90e-79d706725114_zpsaijwu1hl.jpg

in other places. Anyone got any go to typing pages they find this on? Probably having trouble finding a good way to describe it. Plenty of rectangles with notched corners around, is this a rectangle with rounded corners?

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1856 posts in 2473 days


#11 posted 05-12-2017 07:43 PM

I have one like this also.

The “No (STANLEY) 80” is just like yours.
The “B” is there.
There are no markings on the clamp plate.
I can see no markings on the blade (but they may be there).

Mine, however is painted red. The look of it is as if it were factory painted. I bought it together with a 220 block plane with the same red color. It could be a user paint-job, but it’s a very neat job on both. Alternative possibility is that they were part of a school shop. Stanley (I have read) make red/orange/yellow planes and plane parts for school orders to make the planes more distinctive and less likely to be stolen.

-Paul

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ksSlim

1261 posts in 2724 days


#12 posted 05-12-2017 08:10 PM

Ask Don W. he has a lot of older ref Material and has much on his web site.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

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Don W

18520 posts in 2402 days


#13 posted 05-13-2017 12:13 AM

I’ve not seen that exact logo. My guess would be turn of the century, but don’t quote me.

@Ocelot I’d like to see some pictures of the red. I’ve seen a few early Stanley’s that were red. I have an very early block. I’ve heard rumors it may have been for a school or other large customer who ordered them, but never seen any confirmation.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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Ocelot

1856 posts in 2473 days


#14 posted 05-14-2017 01:34 PM

Don,

I haven’t yet had a chance to take the photos, but I will soon and post them for you.

-Paul

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Ocelot

1856 posts in 2473 days


#15 posted 05-15-2017 04:41 PM

I took a lot of photos and posted them on my blog.

http://lumberjocks.com/Ocelot/blog/107177

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