LumberJocks

Buying a sawmill to cut my own boards?

  • Advertise with us

« back to CNC Woodworking forum

Forum topic by MassWood posted 01-02-2017 02:52 PM 1165 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MassWood's profile

MassWood

2 posts in 348 days


01-02-2017 02:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cnc router

I have a question. I bought a small cnc router and was thinking about buying a small portable sawmill to make my own boards. Can I just make my own boards and then use them on my cnc router table right away? Or do I have to cut the trees down and then wait for them to dry out before using them?
Thanks in advance for your responses


13 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27087 posts in 2176 days


#1 posted 01-02-2017 03:02 PM

Drying is essential. If no kiln is available, then you may need to dry and couple years. Sawmills are awesome if you put in the work for the wood.

Welcome to Lumberjocks

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7658 posts in 2752 days


#2 posted 01-02-2017 03:26 PM

+10 on Monte’s comment about putting in the work (and time). Milling your own lumber requires:
  • Time
  • Lots of storage space
  • Endless patience
  • A free or nearly free source of fallen trees/lumber to mill
  • Adequate transportation to haul un-milled lumber (truck, trailer, and possibly a truck mounted hoist that can handle the excessive weight)

I am in my mid-sixties so the above IS NOT on my agenda, however if you are a young pup and full of energy then go for it.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View MassWood's profile

MassWood

2 posts in 348 days


#3 posted 01-02-2017 03:27 PM

Thank you

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

514 posts in 586 days


#4 posted 01-02-2017 03:55 PM

It’s better to find someone with the small sawmill than to buy your own. You’ll want them to use a sharp new bandsaw type blade. Dull ones wander through the wood. And what Horizontalmike says is dead on.

View HerbC's profile (online now)

HerbC

1687 posts in 2697 days


#5 posted 01-02-2017 03:58 PM

You do not leave the logs unmilled to allow them to “dry” or “season” because there will be very little drying when they are in log form. You mill the logs into lumber, then stack the lumber properly for drying, using stick for spacers between each layer of boards. The stack should be in an area that gets good airflow. Drying inside a closed building is not good. Drying under a roof such as a pole barn or open sided shed would be good. Air drying is generally a good process that takes some time, depending on your location and climate and the thickness of your lumber and many other factors. You can speed things up by using a kiln. You can build your own solar kiln or use a dehumidifier to remove the moisture. You can pay someone who has a commercial quality kiln to dry the lumber for you. Bottom line, there’s a lot to learn to be successful converting trees to logs to lumber.

Good luck and …

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1074 posts in 2969 days


#6 posted 01-02-2017 06:32 PM

If you have a bandsaw, you can cut smaller logs with that, but you’ll still be waiting at least a year for boards to air dry. If they are thicker than 1”, than it’ll take even longer.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7658 posts in 2752 days


#7 posted 01-02-2017 06:40 PM

As Gerry states above about resawing with your bandsaw. You can make a small sled for resawing short boards less than 24” or so, because even at that length these short logs are really heavy. However, at this scale resawing is very doable and rewarding.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/100904

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

667 posts in 1057 days


#8 posted 01-02-2017 06:41 PM

good to see ya lookin into it, but theres quite a bit to milling.
also gotta figure out how to move them logs- they aren’t light.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27087 posts in 2176 days


#9 posted 01-02-2017 07:48 PM

I have access to a good- sized bobcat to move the big ones. All logs are brought in via logging truck.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

667 posts in 1057 days


#10 posted 01-05-2017 03:39 PM

yup, you need a mill!!! if ya decide youre getting a mill ya might want to head over to forestryforum.com and see what mills them folks are using and ya will probably get some suggestions,too. great group of folks there,too.


I have access to a good- sized bobcat to move the big ones. All logs are brought in via logging truck.

- Monte Pittman


View WoodNDust's profile

WoodNDust

227 posts in 1944 days


#11 posted 04-30-2017 07:31 PM



yup, you need a mill!!! if ya decide youre getting a mill ya might want to head over to forestryforum.com and see what mills them folks are using and ya will probably get some suggestions,too. great group of folks there,too.

I have access to a good- sized bobcat to move the big ones. All logs are brought in via logging truck.
- Monte Pittman

- tomsteve

I know a fella that bought a Harbor Freight mill and built his own timber framed home. It worked great. And the HF price point is also very good.

View WoodNDust's profile

WoodNDust

227 posts in 1944 days


#12 posted 04-30-2017 07:32 PM



As Gerry states above about resawing with your bandsaw. You can make a small sled for resawing short boards less than 24” or so, because even at that length these short logs are really heavy. However, at this scale resawing is very doable and rewarding.

- HorizontalMike

Very true, HorizontalMike. And it’s much easier on the back.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1723 posts in 1867 days


#13 posted 04-30-2017 09:22 PM

The Rocket Factory on YouTube gives a fantastic one man operation. If you see his series, he talks about real world application of time, money, vehicle, trailer, kiln, milling, etc. Definitely gives me inspiration to do the same in the coming years. Spent a number of hours watching all his videos a couple weekends ago.

View on YouTube

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com