LumberJocks

Ridgid Radial Arm Saw RS1000 table dimensions?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by david68 posted 01-02-2017 02:52 PM 1043 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View david68's profile

david68

7 posts in 350 days


01-02-2017 02:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: saws radial arm saw table dimensions miter saw

Hello Fellow Lumberjocks

This is my first post – please excuse me if I sound like a newbie – I am!

If anyone could share with me the dimensions for the wooden table top parts for the Ridgid RS1000 radial arm saw I would be most appreciative. I recently bought this saw used on kijiji here in the Toronto area, and it did not have the wooden parts. I have searched on-line for several days, but cannot find any information whatsoever on this topic. Specifically, I need sizes for the front table, back table, intermediate table, and size of fence.

Thank you to anyone who can help me.


9 replies so far

View popztoolz's profile

popztoolz

4 posts in 2882 days


#1 posted 01-02-2017 08:02 PM

david68: Here is a link to download complete RS1000 manual for free. I did not see any actual measurements in manual. I have an older Dewalt and when I need a new top, I cut one to cover the area I will be cutting on. Allow for miter cuts. Just don’t cut one with so far of an overhang to the base that it doesn’t stay straight and flat. Also, keep fence low enough so bottom of motor clears. You will see that the top is comprised of three to four sections. best wishes in your woodworking.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#2 posted 01-02-2017 08:05 PM

Size doesn’t matter… just make it as big or small as you need.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View david68's profile

david68

7 posts in 350 days


#3 posted 01-03-2017 02:22 AM

Thanks very much to popztoolz and MrUnix for their replies to my questions about table sizes for the Ridgid RS1000 radial arm saw tables, and for their encouragement in my woodworking. I do appreciate the advice from both of you and will go with that advice, most likely.

I am hung up on the fact that making mistakes in woodworking can be costly – I have already discovered that the hard way, by ruining the lumber I paid a hefty price for.

I found lots of suggestions about using a Craftsman RAS table top as a template, since both types of saws were made by Emerson, but alas, their bases are quite different in size. That is why I was hoping in my original post to find a member who actually owns the Ridgid RS1000 and is using it, and would only have to measure the table sizes and pass them along.

I shall wait a while longer in the hopes that a member of lumberjocks who owns one of these machines sees my post and can add to the already useful suggestions from popztools and MrUnix before I take a deep breath and timidly go where others have feared to tread.

Many thanks, gentlemen, for your time and help. It is much appreciated.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#4 posted 01-03-2017 02:35 AM

Honestly, it doesn’t really matter. I’ve used a RAS where the table was made from the closest size piece of scrap plywood I could find… put it on in a pinch and wound up leaving it on there for over 10 years. Fence was a 2×4 screwed to the plywood. Didn’t measure squat – just made sure it was big enough to fully support the wood under the blade when the carriage was extended out all the way.

Just for reference – the C-man table consisted of 4 pieces, all 40” wide. Front piece was 16” deep, and the other two pieces were 7” and 4”. The ‘fence’ part can be as high or low as you like. All were 1 inch MDF. A piece of 2’x4’ – 1” MDF from the borg would be enough to make the table. I also cover the table with a sacrificial piece of hardboard, so it gets chewed up instead of the MDF.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: From the photos I’ve seen, the base looks identical to the c-man, in both size and construction. In fact, the whole saw looks almost identical with just a few cosmetic differences.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View david68's profile

david68

7 posts in 350 days


#5 posted 01-03-2017 02:42 AM

MrUnix (Brad)

Many thanks for your second reply to my post. This information will be really helpful and I will use them for my template. The idea of the hardboard is an excellent one, too. The idea of deliberately screwing up a new table top by cutting into it was not a prospect I was looking forward to.

Again, much appreciated.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7727 posts in 1847 days


#6 posted 01-03-2017 01:42 PM

The blade of your saw sits “left of center” on the table, so one thing I did when I made a new top for my RAS was extend the length to the left side to give me more support on that side.
.
.

.
.
I also extended the front towards me a bit to give me a bit of room to measure and layout boards while I was cutting stuff up.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View david68's profile

david68

7 posts in 350 days


#7 posted 01-04-2017 02:45 PM

JoeinGa

Thank you very much for sharing your ideas on modifying the dimensions of my radial arm saw table. I liked the idea of having more support for materials on the left side. It also makes very good sense to have a little more room to measure and layout boards on the front table. I am thinking of making my table out of two layers of 3/4 inch fur plywood glued together to provide rigidity and stability for the new table. That would also ensure that I do not weaken the support on the left or the front.

Thank you so much for taking the time to give me your thoughts. They are much appreciated.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7727 posts in 1847 days


#8 posted 01-05-2017 02:10 AM

No problem David. Actually my top is also 2 layers of 3/4”, glued and screwed together. The top layer is a bit longer at both ends. You can see it in this picture. That’s the cabinet I made for mine to set on, I’m 6’2” so I made it a bit taller than a standard height
.
.

.
.
Oh and WELCOME to LJs !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View david68's profile

david68

7 posts in 350 days


#9 posted 01-05-2017 03:15 AM

JoeinGa

Thanks very much for sending along the photo showing your RAS stand and the detail of the top. You and I are close to the same height – I think I have shrunk a little in my old(er) age, and may be 6’1” now. I spent a good part of the day today cutting the material to make my RAS stand and also made it a little higher than standard as I remember that working at our kitchen counter gives me a backache after a while.

I think I must have made a Freudian slip when I wrote that I was going to be using 3/4 “fur” instead of fir plywood – it is well below freezing here in Toronto today and I was trying to keep warm in the garage. I have the plywood glued and clamped and draped over the laundry tubs in the basement to set because I knew that the glue wouldn’t work if I tried it in the cold.

I have also been looking at purchasing a Kreg HD jig for joining the stand together. It appears to be a most useful tool and apparently makes super-strong joints. I liked the stand you built for your RAS – especially the storage for the saw blades inside it.

Thanks again for your most helpful suggestions – I am greatly appreciative. I would also like to be where you are located in Georgia – I hate winter. When I was younger and used to ski, it was great, but now as a retiree, winter is for the birds – any they mostly go south!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com