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Forum topic by Ntaskani posted 01-01-2017 06:00 PM 475 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ntaskani

17 posts in 1026 days


01-01-2017 06:00 PM

I’m planning a built-in bookcase and cabinet around a window in my daughter’s room, and there is an electrical socket in the way on the side wall, and a floor vent exactly where a cabinet (with doors) will go.

Any suggestions on how to overcome these 2 issues?

I was thinking about having an electrician come out and just shut down that electical socket (there are several others in the room). But I don’t know what to do about the vent.

Thank you for any help or advice.


6 replies so far

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jerryminer

798 posts in 1274 days


#1 posted 01-01-2017 06:27 PM

You need to maintain access to that electrical outlet (even if is “shut off”)—- connections can fail. As a professional cabinet installer, I cut a hole in the side of the cabinet and either extend the outlet box into the cabinet, or trim out the opening for a “clean” installation.

Fast Cap makes these for this situation.

If you have a toe-kick base for your cabinet, you can cut in a toe-kick register in the front to let the heated air enter the room. (In some jurisdictions—-including mine—- building codes require a sheet-metal boot to make the transition from floor to cabinet front)

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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Ntaskani

17 posts in 1026 days


#2 posted 01-04-2017 12:59 AM

Thank you Jerryminer.

Do you know where I can get such a sheet metal boot for the transition? I found this on amazon but it costs $70.

https://www.amazon.com/Toe-Ductor-Cabinet-Ducting-Kit/dp/B00CMXXL22/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1483491442&sr=8-1&keywords=toeductor

thanks again.

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jerryminer

798 posts in 1274 days


#3 posted 01-04-2017 02:26 AM

SOP for me is to have my local sheet-metal guy make it up for me. $70 doesn’t sound too bad.

Easier to install if the toe-kick base is built as a separate unit and installed first, then the boot, then the cabinet set on top.

In the old days, we just let the empty space under the cabinet act as a plenum and the air would find its way to the vent. I think the rules changed (to require a metal duct transition) due to a—-perceived or real—- potential fire hazard with lint build-up in the space. I am not recommending this, but lots of houses have heated air flowing freely in the wood space under the cabinet.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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Ntaskani

17 posts in 1026 days


#4 posted 01-04-2017 11:25 AM

Thank you for that info.

What are your thoughts on this set up?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XdndvUEQok

Same issue with fire hazard and lint that you mentioned? I’m leaning towards buying the amazon “toeductor”.

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jerryminer

798 posts in 1274 days


#5 posted 01-04-2017 09:33 PM

That wood box would direct the air to the vent, and operationally would be fine—-but it would not be legal in my jurisdiction because it is wood, not metal. You could do the same thing with sheet metal, though

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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LittleShaver

198 posts in 452 days


#6 posted 01-05-2017 02:41 PM

Sounds like an opportunity to learn a new skill.

Make a mock-up out of card stock or cardboard, then use the mockup parts as patterns to cut the sheet metal. This is not a complex shape. Two J shaped sides and pieces curved to match. Add some flanges for attaching to old duct and toe-kick and you should have it. Be sure to include some tabs on your J’s or flat pieces to fold over to attach them together. Depending on dimensions, you may be able to build the whole thing from a roll of aluminum flashing. I think I paid about $10 for a 10’ x 12” roll last year.

Use a few screws to hold the big parts together, then seal the joints with metal tape.

I really hate that flexible duct used by the Amazon version. Just a linear lint trap.

-- Sawdust Maker

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