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Need Help on Garage Shop Heater Wiring

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Forum topic by Ripper70 posted 01-01-2017 05:41 PM 738 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ripper70

613 posts in 745 days


01-01-2017 05:41 PM

Hello All,

Happy New Year! It seems that I somehow mistakenly ended up on Santa’s Nice List this year and on Christmas morning found this under the tree:

Now, I’m no electrician so I don’t want to have to hardwire this thing. I’m pretty sure I can wire this with a plug and mount it near my one and only 220v outlet. It looks like this:

Can I use this:

With one of these:

My plan is to heat the shop and just unplug and plug the TS (my only 220v tool) in as is needed. Will this setup be a suitable workaround to the hardwiring option I’m trying to avoid? Any and all advice on this topic is welcomed.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo


16 replies so far

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muleskinner

896 posts in 2273 days


#1 posted 01-01-2017 05:56 PM

Not quite scookum enough. You need a 30 amp circuit, #10 wire, 30 amp outlet and plug.

-- Visualize whirled peas

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MrUnix

6000 posts in 2036 days


#2 posted 01-01-2017 06:09 PM

Yup, 6000 Watts @ 240V works out to 25A. What you got ain’t gonna work.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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TheFridge

8301 posts in 1323 days


#3 posted 01-01-2017 06:31 PM

It would work fine with #10 on a 30A ckt with a 6-30 plug and receptacle.

Technically it’s supposed to be sized up to #8 and 40A by a hair (1A) but it’ll work either way.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Ripper70

613 posts in 745 days


#4 posted 01-01-2017 06:33 PM

Okay. Here’s the breaker panel:

So, I need #10 wire and a 30A plug? Can I just switch out the 220v receptacle and use the appropriate plug? Will I need to change the plug on the saw also and is that appropriate? Not sure which receptacle/plug combo to use.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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TheFridge

8301 posts in 1323 days


#5 posted 01-01-2017 06:48 PM

does it have a fan as well?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Ripper70

613 posts in 745 days


#6 posted 01-01-2017 06:52 PM



does it have a fan as well?

- TheFridge

Yes. Like this:

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Ripper70

613 posts in 745 days


#7 posted 01-01-2017 08:04 PM

So, if I swap out the wall outlet with one of these:

And use this plug on the heater and my saw I’ll be good to go?

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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IHRedRules

112 posts in 1313 days


#8 posted 01-01-2017 09:05 PM

By the way it sounds, your best bet is to hire a licensed electrician. No, you cannot just swap the outlet and plug. Your breaker is 20 amp and would need to be replaced with a 30 amp breaker. Also assuming the wire in the wall is less than #10 (since it is a 20 amp circuit, it should be #12), you would need to replace it with #10 wire as well. If it were me, if I had room for another 2 pole breaker in the breaker box, I would just add another circuit.

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 739 days


#9 posted 01-01-2017 09:08 PM

is that heater not to be hard wired only? there is a reason you cant use a plug. also do you prefer infrared over convection?

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tacky68

23 posts in 1264 days


#10 posted 01-01-2017 09:12 PM

Ripper:

Like the Fridge stated, You should have #8 wire, with a 40 amp breaker to power your heater/fan. The breaker that

you showed in the picture is a 20 amp. That will work for your TS. not your heater. That heater will pull 25 amps,

the breaker is only capable of 20, but not sustained. #8 wire with a 40 amp breaker is better than #10 wire with

a 30 amp breaker, to give a bigger margin on startup ( so the breaker does not constantly trip due to overload).

Remember: Volts push. Amps pull.

Good luck. Tim.

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Ripper70

613 posts in 745 days


#11 posted 01-01-2017 09:13 PM



By the way it sounds, your best bet is to hire a licensed electrician. No, you cannot just swap the outlet and plug. Your breaker is 20 amp and would need to be replaced with a 30 amp breaker. Also assuming the wire in the wall is less than #10 (since it is a 20 amp circuit, it should be #12), you would need to replace it with #10 wire as well. If it were me, if I had room for another 2 pole breaker in the breaker box, I would just add another circuit.

- IHRedRules

Aw, shoot. I had this line installed this past summer and figured it’d be all I needed. Cost me $600 bucks!


is that heater not to be hard wired only? there is a reason you cant use a plug.

- DirtyMike

I’m certain that I’ve read/seen this exact heater installed with a plug rather than hardwired.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

474 posts in 387 days


#12 posted 01-01-2017 09:36 PM

Here’s my 2cents… I’m pretty tight so to me I’d never pay someone $600 to do the job. If I was u I’d take pictures of what u hav an get a estimate of how many feet of wire u need an go to a friendly local electric shop. The service ppl there will b able to tell u what all u need to do the right. They’ll know what u need to do it an can tell u how to do it After that if u are still uncomfortable with doing it ask them if they know anyone that can do the work cheap. One of them may do that stuff on the side or hav a friend/relative that does it. Good luck

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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WhyMe

910 posts in 1398 days


#13 posted 01-01-2017 11:53 PM

That heater is to be hardwired. Did you not read the instructions? If using Romex you need #8 for 40A. If using THHN in conduit you can use #10 for 35A. Also you only need 3 wires, 2 hots and a ground, a neutral is not needed.

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RichmanNot

39 posts in 348 days


#14 posted 01-02-2017 12:05 AM

One would ask should this be done by a novice? The answer is HELL NO! Everyone is right here you should get an electrician (you need a friend who is a “sparky”) And I agree that it should be hardwired or at least have a separate disconnect switch. Plugging and unplugging while the receptacle is “hot” may cause some arching or worse yet kill you!

MY 2 CENTS = If you paid $600.00 to run a 20 Amp circuit for your 220 volt Table saw… you paid too much unless it was a lot of wiring involved!

-- "can't died in the poor house" (Because he always went around saying... "I can't")

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mrbob

182 posts in 406 days


#15 posted 01-02-2017 01:09 AM

Electricity is a balance, load, then outlet specs then wire diameter, and breaker size. Anything to small for the load, is a weak link on the chain, and you could have a fire that could destroy your whole house.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

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