LumberJocks

Need tips for sharpening carbide jointer knives

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by jwb96 posted 12-30-2016 08:04 PM 437 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View jwb96's profile

jwb96

6 posts in 520 days


12-30-2016 08:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer sharpening question

I picked up an old Makita 2020 8” jointer and am in the process of getting the knives into better shape. After getting them out, I realized they are carbide tipped. I could just send them off to the sharpening service, but I figure at $32 pre sharpening, I might as well pick up a diamond stone and do it myself.

I made a jig to hold them at the right angle. My question is, should I get a 10” or larger stone so that the entire cutting edge can be against the stone at all times, or could I get away with a 6” or even a 4” stone and just run the stone down the knives in the jig and still ensure straight, parallel edges?

Or, is there a better solution all together?

Thanks,
Jim


4 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3626 posts in 2142 days


#1 posted 12-30-2016 08:27 PM

Send them out to someone who has the proper equipment.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#2 posted 12-30-2016 08:34 PM

I used to touch up the carbide knives in my 735 planer.I used a smith diamond thingy.I will not get out big nicks but brings back a good edge.

-- Aj

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

677 posts in 649 days


#3 posted 12-30-2016 08:51 PM

You will definitely need to buy a stone that will allow the knife edges to remain in contact with the abrasive surface at all times and provide a long continuous stroke. You will also need a diamond abrasive to cut the carbide. Anything less won’t do anything except wear you out. You will also need a very precise jig to hold the knife at the right angle at all times. That is more challenging than you might think. My honest opinion is that you should either send the knives to a sharpening service that is set up to grind carbide or just buy some high speed steel replacement knives that are much easier to sharpen. Before I went to a segmented spiral cutter head, I used to use a sheet of plate glass and a Dulen jig to sharpen high speed steel knives. Here is a link.

http://www.deulentools.com/BuySharpeners.html

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

677 posts in 649 days


#4 posted 12-30-2016 08:54 PM

You will definitely need to buy a stone that will allow the knife edges to remain in contact with the abrasive surface at all times and provide a long continuous stroke. You will also need a diamond abrasive to cut the carbide. Anything less won’t do anything except wear you out. You will also need a very precise jig to hold the knife at the right angle at all times. That is more challenging than you might think. My honest opinion is that you should either send the knives to a sharpening service that is set up to grind carbide or just buy some high speed steel replacement knives that are much easier to sharpen. Before I went to a segmented spiral cutter head, I used to use a sheet of plate glass and a Dulen jig to sharpen high speed steel knives. Here is a link.

http://www.deulentools.com/BuySharpeners.html

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com