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Forum topic by Eric S. posted 12-30-2016 02:56 AM 605 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Eric S.

40 posts in 454 days


12-30-2016 02:56 AM

Ok, here’s my problem. I’m in NJ and I have a few more months of winter. I can’t finish much of anything outside because of the cold, and I can’t stop working completely. I’m debating building a spray booth, and I understand that I should have an explosion proof fan for spraying lacquer and poly.

I can get a cheap inline duct fan, and build a spray station for next to nothing, so my question is, what can I use it for? I know I can switch to water lacquer for spraying. Can I use a wipe on finish like Danish Oil since I’m not spraying? I’d be using it just to vent the fumes, but would I need to worry about explosions?

I’m trying to find some sort of happy compromise here. I need to be able to finish work somehow. Thoughts?

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.


9 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#1 posted 12-30-2016 12:26 PM

Solvent lacquer and varnish (Danish oil) are in different leagues when it comes to explosion problems. Using varnish with something to vent the fumes would be a good solution for you, while the fumes can be flammable…they are of such a low concentration that it won’t be an explosion problem….but they will be a household health problem (if not exhausted). Lacquer can be extremely hazardous and you want either an explosion proof room (not just the fan, but electrical…the lights, outlets, etc.) or do it outside. If you can stand the cold, it won’t affect the lacquer other than it dries more slowly. Now the safety police are going to have a different view on this, and it’s worth considering. If you are one that’s extremely nervous about such things it may be time to switch to waterborne finishes. Just remember, while they are not flammable, they still have unhealthy compounds…so you may still be venting (and wearing breathing protection).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Jeff2016

115 posts in 698 days


#2 posted 12-30-2016 02:14 PM

I’m not sure a cheap inline fan would have the power you need to evacuate the fumes properly. You really need to move a lot of air.
There used to be a guy in my neck of the woods who used a temporary spray booth made of painters plastic and a few 1×4 in his attached garage/ shop. The” intake” was a plywood door of furnace filters to control dust, and he made a plywood plate that mated to his shop air filter to pull the exhaust out side.
I don’t know the details, such as explosion proofing, etc. But I did see it in operation a time or two. He was a fishing lure guy, and sprayed marine epoxy on completed lures.
When he was done , the whole thing came apart (guessing about a hour to do) and was stored in an out of the way corner flat to the wall.
I think inside he had about a 6×6 area. Might not be the than size you need, but you could up size/ downsize pretty cheaply.

-- Proud owner of an electronics free workshop. Please check your cell phone at the door!

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AandCstyle

2901 posts in 2091 days


#3 posted 01-01-2017 12:07 AM

Hey, Eric, I only spray WB products, but I used a used furnace blower to pull the fumes out of my spray room. Here is the thread describing the entire set up if you are interested. HTH

-- Art

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1003 posts in 1829 days


#4 posted 01-01-2017 02:10 AM

I use a box fan blowing out a window in my basement right next to where I spray. I only spray shellac and water based topcoat. I wear a respirator while down there. The fumes are not toxic or explosive from these finishes. It works but it isn’t fancy. And the upstairs never gets any smell.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Eric S.'s profile

Eric S.

40 posts in 454 days


#5 posted 01-02-2017 12:12 AM

Ok, so it sounds like I do have some options. Thanks everyone.

I just bought an inline duct fan that blows at about 450 cfm. I’m going to build a hood and see how it works out. Hopefully I can keep the odor down, and I’ll just avoid lacquers that aren’t water based until spring. Most of what I do is small projects, so I don’t need a ton of space to spray furniture or anything large.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

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TOOLWHORE

4 posts in 344 days


#6 posted 01-02-2017 03:02 AM

You’ll need “Make-up air” supplied to the basement. Failure to do so will create a negative pressure in your basement, and a down-draft in your chimney. This will result in Carbon-Monoxide from your Hot Water & Heating Equipment being drawn into the home instead of being exhausted up the Chimney. The result will be Carbon- Monoxide Poisoning and or Death. I fiddle with wood, but my Day Job is a Licensed HVAC Tech.

If you don’t supply make-up air, then the chimney becomes the makeup air source.
Death is probably unlikely, but Carbon-Monoxide Poisoning is not. Equal consideration should be given to a dust collector which vents outdoors.

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Eric S.

40 posts in 454 days


#7 posted 01-02-2017 04:13 AM



You ll need “Make-up air” supplied to the basement. Failure to do so will create a negative pressure in your basement, and a down-draft in your chimney. This will result in Carbon-Monoxide from your Hot Water & Heating Equipment being drawn into the home instead of being exhausted up the Chimney. The result will be Carbon- Monoxide Poisoning and or Death. I fiddle with wood, but my Day Job is a Licensed HVAC Tech.

If you don t supply make-up air, then the chimney becomes the makeup air source.
Death is probably unlikely, but Carbon-Monoxide Poisoning is not. Equal consideration should be given to a dust collector which vents outdoors.

- TOOLWHORE

The fan is only a 450 cfm fan. It’s a little more powerful than a bathroom exhaust fan. I can’t imagine that I’ll need to worry about a negative pressure issue in a huge basement with that small of a fan. I also have a carbon monoxide detector, so I’m not too worried about that.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

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TOOLWHORE

4 posts in 344 days


#8 posted 01-02-2017 04:21 AM

Then don’t worry about it, if that’s your view, but others may have the same plan as you with a larger fan and find this information useful in their design considerations. Information is always key. I benefit greatly from information contained in posts and I’m sure most others do as well.

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Eric S.

40 posts in 454 days


#9 posted 01-02-2017 04:41 PM



Then don t worry about it, if that s your view, but others may have the same plan as you with a larger fan and find this information useful in their design considerations. Information is always key. I benefit greatly from information contained in posts and I m sure most others do as well.

- TOOLWHORE

Agreed. I wasn’t discounting your advice, nor did I mean it to come off that way if it did. I just don’t think it applies in my particular situation, but as you said, it may apply to others.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

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