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Should I get a Rabbeting Jack even if it doesn't have a depth stop?

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Forum topic by RussJohnson posted 12-29-2016 11:12 PM 1182 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussJohnson

56 posts in 1655 days


12-29-2016 11:12 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

Gents and Ladies,

I’ve come into a little end of the year money and I want to get another hand plane (or two). I really have my eye set on the Veritas Bevel Up Rabbeting Jack plane, because it looks like it can do everything. My only concern with it is that it doesn’t have a depth stop to help me make my rabbets a uniform depth.

I’ve never used any rabbeting planes before, is this a big deal? I’ve got a router plane that I use on hinge mortises and I really like having the depth stop on that.

The other option is to get a less extensive rabbeting plane that has a depth stop and a jack plane. I’m not too thrilled about doing that, but I don’t want to get the rabbeting jack plane and find out that I can’t make reliable rabbets with it. It looks to be about $350 for the rabbeting jack plane or about $500 for a rabbet plane and jack plane.

Do any of you folks have any experience on the matter you could share? My only bench plane experience is a veritas bevel up jointer, that I love and enjoy using, but it’s too big for most tasks and the blade isn’t set up for dealing with rough wood.


8 replies so far

View GlenintheNorth's profile

GlenintheNorth

241 posts in 369 days


#1 posted 12-30-2016 12:07 AM

I can only say from experience that I like a stop for making even depths.

As far as whether it is possible to get even depths, like every tool, you’ll have to practice! Your first one might not look so good but your second might be better, and your third better still. If you’ve ever used a Stanley #9 or #10 the jack rabbet should be pretty close to the same.

It’s up to you but I get along pretty good without.

-- MFia-made man. But that doesn't mean I don't dig my 45. Minneapolis/St. Paul, burbs.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3678 posts in 1794 days


#2 posted 12-30-2016 12:40 PM

I agree. You can use a marking gauge to strike a line and keep the plane parallel and down to the line, but with a depth stop is easier. You can even do it with a chisel and marking gauge. With or without a depth stop you have to be able to keep the plane level or the rabbet bottom will be skewed.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2600 posts in 2830 days


#3 posted 12-30-2016 01:03 PM

This one .
Skewed blade for easier cuts.
Depth stop is a must have !
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=59999&cat=1,230,41182,48945
Just my opinion.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

915 posts in 2785 days


#4 posted 12-31-2016 04:06 AM

Russ, rabbet planes without depth stops have been in use for centuries. A depth stop is nice to have (I like them), but it is not a necessity. As mentioned above, there are ways to get consistent results without them. I would say don’t let that cause you to pass over a tool you really want because you don’t need a depth stop.
Good Luck!

-- Mike

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Tim

3678 posts in 1794 days


#5 posted 12-31-2016 01:39 PM

Oh, and I just looked at that Bevel-up jack rabbet plane and noticed what I should have from your first post. That’s a jack plane and would be great for really large rabbets, but small joinery rabbets would be pretty difficult with a plane that large.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=69851&cat=1,41182,48945&ap=1

Also just re-read and noticed you have a router plane. You can use that for final tune up and end up with pretty good rabbets in a lot of situations (but not all) with that too.

It all comes down to how much you will use it for whether a specialty plane is worth it or not. If you do lots of rabbets a rabbet plane with depth stop will be nice. If you don’t, it may sit there more than not.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8287 posts in 1319 days


#6 posted 12-31-2016 02:02 PM



Oh, and I just looked at that Bevel-up jack rabbet plane and noticed what I should have from your first post. That s a jack plane and would be great for really large rabbets, but small joinery rabbets would be pretty difficult with a plane that large.

- Tim

That was my first thought.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2600 posts in 2830 days


#7 posted 12-31-2016 02:56 PM

Some good points mentioned above .
When I offered my advice I was thinking of only rabbets for cabinet work.
If you are doing timber framing and log building the larger rabbet plane is ideal AND you probably could get by without a depth stop.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Tim

3678 posts in 1794 days


#8 posted 12-31-2016 03:14 PM



That was my first thought.

- TheFridge


That’s because you’re smarterer than I am.

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