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Forum topic by AlaskaGuy posted 12-28-2016 06:18 PM 1242 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


12-28-2016 06:18 PM

14 replies so far

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JAAune

1769 posts in 2157 days


#1 posted 12-28-2016 06:27 PM

Anyone doing it for a living should definitely have insurance. That being said, the main reason for the high settlement cost was because Ikea is big enough to have that much money. Lawyers wouldn’t have been interested in going after a small time manufacturer.

All chests of drawers (and filing cabinets) are prone to tipping if too many drawers are extended. It’s a fault inherent to the design of tall case goods that have drawers. They’re very useful but probably shouldn’t be placed in rooms where toddlers will be left unsupervised.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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TravisH

551 posts in 1775 days


#2 posted 12-28-2016 06:47 PM

Mixed feelings towards this sort of stuff. Completely avoidable accident just lack of education or laziness on the parents part not to anchor the dresser, tv stand, etc… I anchored all our dressers 15 years ago when we had are first child. Just something I thought was common knowledge.

Most of these type dressers have warnings in the assembly booklet and contain anchors. I could understand mandating IKEA and all other manufactures include this in the assembly and maybe a sticker in all the drawers and on the back depicting the risk and dangers associated with the dresser but that should be it. After that the purchaser should be responsible for proper use and set up.

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jmartel

7533 posts in 1990 days


#3 posted 12-28-2016 07:13 PM

It’s also a bad design on Ikea’s part. There wouldn’t be such a big settlement if they weren’t at fault.

The dresser is too light, not deep enough, and too front/top heavy. Makes it way easier to tip. Obviously the parents should have used anchors, but it’s just a bad design all around. If properly installed, the anchors would have stopped it. But even then, most people just put the screw into drywall and don’t bother trying to hit a stud. So the anchor wouldn’t help them much in that case, either.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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AlaskaGuy

3662 posts in 2149 days


#4 posted 12-28-2016 09:08 PM



It s also a bad design on Ikea s part. There wouldn t be such a big settlement if they weren t at fault.

The dresser is too light, not deep enough, and too front/top heavy. Makes it way easier to tip. Obviously the parents should have used anchors, but it s just a bad design all around. If properly installed, the anchors would have stopped it. But even then, most people just put the screw into drywall and don t bother trying to hit a stud. So the anchor wouldn t help them much in that case, either.

- jmarte

Wow, I hope you never get on a jury.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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TravisH

551 posts in 1775 days


#5 posted 12-28-2016 09:09 PM

Width: 31 1/2 ”
Depth: 18 7/8 ”
Height: 39 3/8

Many dressers have similar dimensions in regards to depth. I don’t really see it as being a bad design unless we are solely basing the claim that it can tip over therefore bad design. Did IKEA have the warnings on the site, in the instructions and stickers on the shelves as shown in the instruction manual when these units were sold?

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/assembly_instructions/malm-drawer-chest__AA-1909606-2_pub.pdf

Settlements are large because unfortunately in today’s society the general public wants to punish anyone/any company that has money with as much as possible. Too many see it as some sort of lottery so companies will fork over the money to settle and move on to avoid the negative publicity (warranted or not) and potential higher judgments against them. IKEA is in a no win situation so best to shell out the money and move on as the longer this went on the more damaging it was. Nothing fair or just about it. Difficult in these cases because we are talking about loss of life and children.

The lawyers stated “inherently unstable and easily tipped over” and that Ikea had consistently refused to meet voluntary national safety standards for the stability of chests and dressers. I hate it when we don’t have 100% compliance with voluntary standards/rules. Make it mandatory standard for retail if truly important as I see it bogus other wise. I guess we should look up these standards as we are all negligent if not meeting them?

My children have an outdoor play set (all too old now to play on it). The typical 4×4 and 2×4 stuff with slide, swings, rope, etc… My middle son when when we was between 2 and 3 nearly hung himself. He was playing with the rope and tried sliding down the slide. I was weeding in the garden and just got that strange feeling and turned around to see him midway down the slide on a taught rope. I quickly grabbed him by his shirt and slide him up the slide and unwrapped the rope from his neck. I in no way felt that retailer was responsible or negligent or the company that made the set up, or the homeowner that installed it. It scared me but I didn’t take the rope down as I see it as one of those things that can happen.

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JAAune

1769 posts in 2157 days


#6 posted 12-28-2016 09:37 PM

The sad thing is that most of the money will probably stop at the lawyers’ pockets. I’ve been dragged into a class-action lawsuit against eBay without my knowledge and got a check in the mail for my share of the dough. It was for roughly 50 cents and I don’t know what the lawsuit was about.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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Blackie_

4796 posts in 2353 days


#7 posted 12-28-2016 09:51 PM

Ok so I read everyone’s comments and all hit on what I was curious about from what I read in the article, did they present warning signs, a mounting template so as to hit the studs for the anchors?

When I purchased my wall mounts for my large scale TV’s they came with mounting templates and instructions.

You pretty much have to make what ever you produce idiot proof because the consumer bares no responsibility even if they are at fault. A good example, the McDonald’s law suit for the hot coffee spill.

When making my boxes, I make it a habit to sand down any and all sharp edges on the drawers and side walls.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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Rick_M

10645 posts in 2220 days


#8 posted 01-04-2017 07:43 AM

My wife came home with one of those a few years back. If you pull out one drawer it tips over. Garbage. She took it back.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Dustin

409 posts in 581 days


#9 posted 01-04-2017 01:50 PM



The sad thing is that most of the money will probably stop at the lawyers pockets. I ve been dragged into a class-action lawsuit against eBay without my knowledge and got a check in the mail for my share of the dough. It was for roughly 50 cents and I don t know what the lawsuit was about.

- JAAune

Yeah, I unwittingly got a check from one of the big cell carriers several months back. Something to the tune of $0.08. I got a real kick out of the notion that the postage and printing cost several times more than the value of the check!

Also, yeah, this is a really sad case, but the only surefire way I’ve found to be safe is to be paranoid. We have a cheapo DVD shelf (tall, marginally narro, and shallow) from several years ago. When we had kids, I used 2” angle brackets with coarse threaded screws to secure the sides of the shelves to the solid chair rail running around the room. Checked it by grabbing the top myself and leaning back at full arm’s length. Mind you, the weight of this flimsy thing and it’s contents probably doesn’t exceed 15 lbs, but for $3 of hardware and 10 minutes of work, the peace of mind couldn’t be beat.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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splatman

586 posts in 1239 days


#10 posted 01-05-2017 12:26 AM



Yeah, I unwittingly got a check from one of the big cell carriers several months back. Something to the tune of $0.08. I got a real kick out of the notion that the postage and printing cost several times more than the value of the check!

- Dustin


Back in the 90’s, my Dad did the stock market thing, and once got a check for 10 cents. The first thing I thought of, and also the first thing my Mom commented on, was the postage. Never mind the costs of materials and labor to make it happen in the first place. I don’t remember what happened after that. Did my Dad change something, or did he keep receiving and cashing those silly little checks and not say anything? I’ll have to ask him.

Back on topic:
This has given me something to think about if I sell what I build. I have sold stuff before; fortunately, I have had no issues.

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Cooler

299 posts in 683 days


#11 posted 01-09-2017 02:56 PM

Deep pockets cause lawsuits. Ikea has deep pockets.

Many years ago a young girl practicing on the uneven parallel bars fell and broke her back. She would spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair.

The cause of the accident was a catastrophic break of one of the uprights. The uprights were made from high tensile steel.

A janitor/handyman welded a bracket to the upright to anchor the parallel bars to a wall to prevent it from “walking around” on the floor. Predictably the upright broke at the weld.

The jury found against the manufacturer of the parallel bars (which had deep pockets) and not against the real culprit (the janitor/handyman) who welded on the bracket thus compromising the strength of the upright. The janitor/handyman did not have deep pockets.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/3ZlfetqnVUM/maxresdefault.jpg

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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PaulHWood

412 posts in 2093 days


#12 posted 01-09-2017 04:31 PM

For years, Ikeas products have come with wall straps. Any tall item that a child will climb on can tip. Ikea’s are just lighter and a little easier.

Litigious society we live in does not have the word “accident” or “personal responsibility” in the dictionary

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

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dbray45

3295 posts in 2617 days


#13 posted 01-09-2017 04:58 PM

I have three things to say about this
1.) the case was not deep enough
2.) where were the parents?
3.) why did they not child proof the room(s)? this includes eliminating tip and fall hazards and filling drawers so this doesn’t happen. If you are not going to child proof the room, teach the children how to not let this happen.

When did this mentality of everything is always someone else’s fault for the parents being stupid come about. If Ikea builds something that is not safe, why are they selling 8 million of them.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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ColonelTravis

1681 posts in 1734 days


#14 posted 01-09-2017 05:13 PM

I tend to agree with you David, but there’s info. we don’t know. From the story:

It was the families who were at fault, Ikea countered, for not supporting the Malm dressers with wall anchors as the instructions indicated.

Alan Feldman, an attorney with Feldman Shepherd, the Philadelphia-based law firm representing the three families, would not elaborate to the Inquirer about the depth of Ikea’s knowledge of tip-overs. But previously confidential documents that Ikea turned over to the attorneys “100 percent” provided leverage for a settlement, he said.

Story doesn’t say what that info. was. I guess because IKEA settled for this much money it knew it was in the wrong.

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