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Forum topic by MosesLakeDennis posted 08-17-2010 01:59 AM 1873 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MosesLakeDennis

23 posts in 1893 days


08-17-2010 01:59 AM

Has anyone had luck with using wood bleach to keep white sap wood light in color. I have beatiful Walnut Burl with white sap wood, but it turns brownish, thus loses the contrast. Thank you in advance. Dennis


13 replies so far

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fussy

980 posts in 1702 days


#1 posted 08-19-2010 04:39 AM

Dennis,

You’d have to be very careful in applying it, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work. Try it with scrap first. The thing is, the contrast may turn out to be TOO much. Is the finish causing the color change? Oil-based products will cause yeallowing, as you know. Try super=blond shellac or water-based poly.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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MosesLakeDennis

23 posts in 1893 days


#2 posted 09-03-2010 10:55 PM

Steve – I used the 2 part bleach solution approach on my Walnut burl (sapwood only) and one application appears to have made the contrast I was looking for. I applied 2 coats on a scrap piece and it is washing out more of the grain. I will continue to use the bleach. Dennis

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richgreer

4524 posts in 1726 days


#3 posted 09-04-2010 02:47 PM

I have had some success using bleach on hackberry. Hackberry is naturally a dull gray/off white wood. It’s not an attractive color. It can be made to look more like maple with some bleach.

However, I think it would be very hard to control the application to just affect the say wood on walnut.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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fussy

980 posts in 1702 days


#4 posted 09-05-2010 01:31 AM

Dennis,

Glad it’s working for you. You seem to be a talented guy with a wide range of interests. Anyone who can live through raising three sons gets my vote. Of course, your WIFE has lived through raising FOUR boys.

Stay safe thiss weekend.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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MosesLakeDennis

23 posts in 1893 days


#5 posted 09-06-2010 06:29 AM

Rich – Actually it was quite easy to apply the bleach only on the walnut sap wood. I simply used a very small brush and make sure I don’t have too much bleach on the brush when I first apply, which keeps the liquid from running. Also the walnut, although sanded to 400, was very absorbant and reduced risk of running. I know…......too much information. Be well. Dennis

p.s. Fussy – Raising 3 sons (18, 23, 26) was a breeze. Not since they were 11, 8 and 3 have they argued or fought wiith each other. Now I just have to pay for their colleges USC, Univ. of Michigan, Univ. of Texas.

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fussy

980 posts in 1702 days


#6 posted 09-06-2010 09:27 AM

a smart guy like you would have arranged things so that they All GET FULL BOOGIE scholorships`. With the money you save, you can afford to fly them home Thanksgiving in the G IV SP you always wanted. Good move.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1573 days


#7 posted 09-06-2010 10:29 AM

The best is to seal the sapwood rather than bleach. Actually your problem is retaining the color of sapwood rather than bleacking it. I have similar problem on my spiral design which is ongoing but I alredy solved it. I will be using wood glue as first coat sealant.

On bleaching the sapwood, I think it is only an added task without meeting the objective… After bleaching the sapwood, it will then absorb the poly or any other liquid and discolor again. Bleach is used mostly for equalizing the wood with other wood, say when you don’t want the original color and will stain it. But not as a sealant.

-- Bert

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MosesLakeDennis

23 posts in 1893 days


#8 posted 09-07-2010 05:13 PM

Bert – are you saying I should rough turn to 10% thickness, apply CA glue or a polyeurathane only to the sap wood and months later re-turn to finish product? There is considerable moisture in the wood and it waffles considerably when drying. The sap wood turning white to brown can begin at the edge of the heart wood so don’t know if sealling the sap wood wood would keep it from turning. Will give it more thought. Maybe try on a small piece that I will be cutting off of the huge burl remaining.

I think you are right that the wood will absorb the poly/liquid and will discolor, but it will happen to both the sap and heart wood, so hopefully there will remain some contrast. Maybe not al much as when completed. Thanks for the input! Dennis

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BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1573 days


#9 posted 09-08-2010 02:44 AM

Dennis,
Firstly, applying a good sealer is enough (this is why CA glue is much better) for the wood if along the grain but if the burl sap is an endgrain (I expect this is an endgrain) it will absorb more than the heartwood. Texture are different so therefore discolorization is much on the sapwood and lost the contrast. In a pine tree, the hard wood grain is light and the soft grain becomes dark after applying stain because of different absorbing capabilities. This also applies to the sapwood and heartwood. Take photos of your experiment and post it. Thanks for trying this. It will be a big loss if you make the sap discolor and you can no longer recover the original with sanding much….

-- Bert

View millmgr's profile

millmgr

27 posts in 1763 days


#10 posted 09-27-2010 07:53 PM

Have had extensive experience with wood bleach on hard maple to keep sapwood uniform and minimize appearance of sticker stain. Needs to be applied uniformly with sponge and allowed to dry. minimal sanding ok afterwards to get rid of raised grain. Bleaching penetrates only 1/16” or so so no further machining. Tried on sticker stain in ash flooring. Didn’t seem to work as well as on hard maple. Not sure what will happen on walnut sapwood.

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MosesLakeDennis

23 posts in 1893 days


#11 posted 09-30-2010 07:28 PM

Thanks to everyone’s suggestions. I applied 2 coats of Wood Kote bleach (2 liquids mixed together) and it worked wonderfully! Lightened up enough to enhance the contrast between sap and heart wood, but didn’t bleach too much that would have washed away the grain. Have several natural edge vases in process. Dennis

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a1Jim

112074 posts in 2228 days


#12 posted 09-30-2010 07:56 PM

I would be very careful using wood bleach make sure your in a well ventilated area and never mix more than on type of bleach .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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MosesLakeDennis

23 posts in 1893 days


#13 posted 09-30-2010 08:18 PM

Jim – thank for the input. I am typically outside at the patio table wearing rubber gloves, a dust mask and with glasses. Not sure what you meant by “never mix more than on type of bleach”. I use a very small brush where I can apply to the unjulating wood rings/jigs and jags. Dennis

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