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Question on mitigating lunchbox planer noise

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Forum topic by averagedadworkshop posted 12-27-2016 05:44 PM 1420 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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averagedadworkshop

28 posts in 1089 days


12-27-2016 05:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question planer

So, I picked up a DW734 last weekend knowing that it was going to be loud, but underestimating the impact on my family. I am a basement hobby woodworker and quickly found that my two young boys were not fans of the amount of noise created by my new toy. I even tried hauling it up to the garage and running some boards through it out there, but I ended up with the same result, a crying little boy and I am taking the smallest pass I can. Anybody have thoughts on how to reduce the noise level?

-- "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are." - Theodore Roosevelt


15 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1769 posts in 2155 days


#1 posted 12-27-2016 05:49 PM

Helical heads are available for that planer if I’m not mistaken. That’s the only way to significantly reduce the noise level. It’s either that or you’ll need to work on sound-proofing the entire basement.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8328 posts in 1325 days


#2 posted 12-27-2016 05:52 PM

Sounds about right.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4762 posts in 2332 days


#3 posted 12-27-2016 06:06 PM

What they said^^^^. Those machines are just loud, period, and moving it out of earshot or finding a really well sound deadened room is about it. BTW, hook a DC to it and it will get a lot louder. One of the biggest advantage of the helical heads (among many) is the very good reduction in noise a planer makes.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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averagedadworkshop

28 posts in 1089 days


#4 posted 12-27-2016 07:34 PM

Thank you for the input! That’s what I was afraid of, unfortunately the helical head is out of the question at this point budget wise. I guess my next project is sound proofing the basement! :)

-- "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are." - Theodore Roosevelt

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JAAune

1769 posts in 2155 days


#5 posted 12-27-2016 11:10 PM

Insulation and isolation are important for sound-proofing. I’m not an expert but I believe some of the other guys here have experience and links to articles explaining the concepts. There have been threads on the topic before that may be useful and should be easy to find with the search function.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1566 posts in 3600 days


#6 posted 12-28-2016 12:45 AM

Soundproofing your basement is only 1/2 of the story.

Some of these universal motor planers have noise levels above 100 decibels, which can cause very rapid permanent hearing loss. Let me repeat, nothing is more permanent than permanent.

Purchase a set of very good hearing protectors, like the Peltor with 29 decibel reduction. use these with ear plugs as well.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 1949 days


#7 posted 12-28-2016 05:58 PM

Fortunately, a planer gets used far less often than other tools, like your table saw.

I just pick and choose when I use my lunchbox planer…

It’s the one tool that drives my wife crazy, so I try not to use it when it’ll cause a conflict. Just plan ahead and get your stock surfaced in batches.

+100 on the Peltor 29 dB muffs. They’re so cheap, you can have a few pairs around the shop for easy grabbing.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

981 posts in 430 days


#8 posted 12-28-2016 07:53 PM



Soundproofing your basement is only 1/2 of the story.

Some of these universal motor planers have noise levels above 100 decibels, which can cause very rapid permanent hearing loss. Let me repeat, nothing is more permanent than permanent.

Purchase a set of very good hearing protectors, like the Peltor with 29 decibel reduction. use these with ear plugs as well.

- 8iowa


I did not know they make Peltor with 29 decibel reduction for small kids.

View averagedadworkshop's profile

averagedadworkshop

28 posts in 1089 days


#9 posted 12-28-2016 10:06 PM



Soundproofing your basement is only 1/2 of the story.

Some of these universal motor planers have noise levels above 100 decibels, which can cause very rapid permanent hearing loss. Let me repeat, nothing is more permanent than permanent.

Purchase a set of very good hearing protectors, like the Peltor with 29 decibel reduction. use these with ear plugs as well.

- 8iowa

That is something that I take seriously, I wear the same kind of ear muffs I use for shooting when working in my shop.

-- "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are." - Theodore Roosevelt

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2577 posts in 2761 days


#10 posted 12-28-2016 10:33 PM

If you replace the blades it will become quieter…..for a while. As the blades dull, the noise level increases.

-- No PHD, but I have a GED and my DD 214

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3207 days


#11 posted 12-28-2016 11:23 PM

I just take mine outside and use it.

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1566 posts in 3600 days


#12 posted 12-30-2016 01:30 PM

Check out the selection of hearing protectors from midway-usa;

http://www.midwayusa.com/s?targetLocation=%2F_%2FN-10509%3FNo%3D0%26Np%3D2%26Nr%3DAND%2528p_visible%253A1%252Ccustomertypeid%253A1%2529%26Nrpp%3D144%26Ns%3Dp_metric_sales_velocity%257C1%26Ntpc%3D1%26Ntpr%3D1

There are several ladies and youth models available.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

988 posts in 2904 days


#13 posted 12-30-2016 02:35 PM

I agree with JAAune. Here’s some supporting evidence: I went from a Delta planer that screamed at about 105 db when planing wood, to a Woodmaster that dropped to 92db, then by adding a helical head to the Woodmaster I was down to 82 db.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1702 posts in 1061 days


#14 posted 12-30-2016 03:08 PM

Shooting muffs, for everyone in your family (and your neighbors!)

Seriously, these things are loud and I don’t think any amount of insulation will reduce the noise in the house to an acceptable level.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1769 posts in 2155 days


#15 posted 12-30-2016 03:28 PM



Seriously, these things are loud and I don t think any amount of insulation will reduce the noise in the house to an acceptable level.

- splintergroup

Insulation is only part of sound-proofing. That combined with isolation and other vibration-dampening techniques can be effective but will certainly cut into headroom and floor space (and cost money).

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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