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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 12-27-2016 12:43 AM 357 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

333 posts in 1219 days


12-27-2016 12:43 AM

This project has taken me over a year because I can only work on it maybe 8 hours a week and there was a lot of mistakes and learning. But my wife is really happy with how it came out. So now I need a build a second one and hope do it better and faster by better planning and using the skills I have acquired. One thing that I an considering to do different is use plywood for the sides instead of solid wood. The reason being the solid wood made it very heavy and the grain is running perpendicular to the internal structure which is not good for wood movement. I got some of the wood for free so I didn’t think twice about using it. On this one I used floating tenons to join the sides to the legs which have mortises cut in them so the side butts to the leg. That was a lot of work. I am guessing that M&T going into the side of plywood may not work so well. So I am thinking about cutting a dado into one corner of the leg and then I can just overlap the plywood and glue it the dado. Also the arch on the bottom of the plywood will be exposed so I will have a glue a strip to it to cover the edge. Would like hear any ideas about this.

I found this which looks like a frame and panel for the sides, it makes sense to me since the solid pieces are running horizontal instead of vertical. It will look different from the first one but I think that is ok.

http://www.home-dzine.co.za/diy/diy-shakersideboard.htm

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


5 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1011 posts in 1833 days


#1 posted 12-27-2016 02:13 AM

You could run a dado in the length of the leg, which I would still make out of solid wood, and then glue in a plywood panel. This would work for the sides and back just fine. I’d still m&t the front, or dowel it.

Iron on edge banding works pretty good for covering the end of plywood.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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EugdOT

213 posts in 393 days


#2 posted 12-27-2016 02:14 AM

Plywood would definitely speed things up, but I would consider using pocket holes instead of m&t joint or floating tendons, since all of the holes would be inside the case you would on see any of them you can get a small kreg jig for $20 lowe’s, or since you gave it a painted and antiqued finish, you can use butt joints and use a plug or use a wood filler, and or wrap the corners in hardwood with a dado running the length of the legs to hide the unfinished plywood edge. BTW. The top looks very good, I really like the color and grain.

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Joel_B

333 posts in 1219 days


#3 posted 12-27-2016 02:32 AM


Plywood would definitely speed things up, but I would consider using pocket holes instead of m&t joint or floating tendons, since all of the holes would be inside the case you would on see any of them you can get a small kreg jig for $20 lowe s, or since you gave it a painted and antiqued finish, you can use butt joints and use a plug or use a wood filler, and or wrap the corners in hardwood with a dado running the length of the legs to hide the unfinished plywood edge. BTW. The top looks very good, I really like the color and grain.

- EugdOT

Yeah the top came out pretty good after a lot of trial and error. The first top I made was from the the free oak that I got and was two wide, flat sawn pieces glued together. I ran the pieces through the planar but they warped badly after gluing and the grain was pretty boring. So I bought a nice piece of QS white oak and made a new top from four pieces glued together. The stain is a blend of GF dye stain, 4 parts light brown, 1 part cinnamon. Followed by GF WB poly.

I am thinking the pocket screws could come in handy on the two internal frames which are four pieces glued together in a rectangle. I used floating tenons there which is probably overkill since you never see it.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 758 days


#4 posted 12-27-2016 02:33 AM

Joel_B,

Nice job on the first table. If the wife loves it, you did good!

It sounds as if you would like to build the entire second side table from plywood; or at least a substantial amount of the project hoping to save some time and maybe expense. If you bought plywood to match the first side table, it could be done. But there could be a fair amount of edge banding and flushing up required. Also, splitter free plywood cuts can be a challenge.

I would probably land between the extremes of all plywood construction and all solid wood construction. The sides, back and drawer boxes could be plywood and no edge banding would be necessary. The legs, face frame, end frames, and top made of solid wood could give the second table a nearly indistinguishable appearance from the first side table.

Stopped dados in the front and back legs and full dados in the top and bottom side rails could accept the plywood side panels. A rabbet in the back legs could accept the plywood back. I suppose pocket screws could be used to assemble the face frame (for speed) but I personally prefer mortise and tenons. Some corner blocks installed near the top at each corner could offer attaching points for the solid wood top.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1177 posts in 1636 days


#5 posted 12-27-2016 02:37 AM

Nice looking night stand.I think adding plywood is fine esp if it speeds up your build.
Good job.

Aj

-- Aj

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