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Sliding mitre saw from Lowes

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Forum topic by jtp79 posted 12-25-2016 08:18 PM 814 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jtp79

32 posts in 367 days


12-25-2016 08:18 PM

I have a 12 inch dewalt that doesn’t slide that I have used for years but starting to mess with larger pieces of wood, I am needing to make larger cross cuts so I am looking to upgrade. Lowes has a dewalt for 599, a hitachi for 449 and a kobalt for 299. Which one of these should I look at? I’ve had good luck with the dewalt but a couple of guys at Lowes tell me that local cabinet guys either use hitachi or kobalt. That they are more accurate. Not sure I believe that. What do you guys think or suggest on these saws?


11 replies so far

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Carloz

954 posts in 425 days


#1 posted 12-25-2016 09:48 PM

My guess is that “guys at Lowes” get more kickbacks selling Kobalt (which is coincidently their in house brand) than Dewalt.

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Slider20

119 posts in 355 days


#2 posted 12-25-2016 10:40 PM

Don’t know about either, I have the Bosch sliding miter, really nice plus it can be used while flush against the wall, unlike most other sliders.

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Tabletop

126 posts in 581 days


#3 posted 12-25-2016 10:45 PM

Would not own a Kobalt. Made for very occasional use, in my opinion. The Dewalt is a smooth machine but the hitachi is not far behind. For the money I would get the hitachi. I found it the other day on amazon for $379 and Lowes will match it.

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MrUnix

5975 posts in 2032 days


#4 posted 12-25-2016 10:56 PM

I’ve never been real fond of Kobalt, but there are a lot of folks who are. And I really doubt the sales guys are pushing them because it’s a house brand… I know that home depot doesn’t push their house brands (or encourage the floor sales guys to do so), as the managers are striving for larger gross sales figures rather than bottom line profits. They do tell them to suggest accessories and other related items to boost up that figure though. Don’t ask me how I know – I’m trying to forget that period of my life :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 402 days


#5 posted 12-26-2016 12:15 AM


I ve never been real fond of Kobalt, but there are a lot of folks who are. And I really doubt the sales guys are pushing them because it s a house brand… I know that home depot doesn t push their house brands (or encourage the floor sales guys to do so), as the managers are striving for larger gross sales figures rather than bottom line profits. They do tell them to suggest accessories and other related items to boost up that figure though. Don t ask me how I know – I m trying to forget that period of my life :)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

But it was a learning and most likely a humbling time, those are always good when you look back on them. Dont ask me how I know either!!! I agree, plus I doubt they get any type of commission.

View John's profile

John

223 posts in 1415 days


#6 posted 12-26-2016 01:38 AM

I have a non sliding miter saw. I rarely use it except for when im doing a trim job. Most crosscuts in the shop are handled by a table saw sled or miter gauge. Both of which are considerably cheaper than any scms.

-- I measured once, cut twice, and its still too short...

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jtp79

32 posts in 367 days


#7 posted 12-26-2016 01:55 AM



I have a non sliding miter saw. I rarely use it except for when im doing a trim job. Most crosscuts in the shop are handled by a table saw sled or miter gauge. Both of which are considerably cheaper than any scms.

- John

I’m in the process of upgrading a table saw also but I got about 350 dollars worth of gifts from Lowes that I already have so I was gonna upgrade this saw. My table saw is small so cutting long boards is tough. Maybe I should look into a sled as I am not familiar with them.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

954 posts in 425 days


#8 posted 12-26-2016 04:05 AM

I never felt a need for a miter saw. I imagine it could be useful if you need to crosscut very long boards in the rate 2 per minute. Fo those rate cases when I need to cut a long board a hand saw works as good.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5453 posts in 2044 days


#9 posted 12-26-2016 04:09 AM

I have the 10in Kobalt and think that its quality reflects the price point. It is a step above the entry level sliders in build quality and precision, but not the level of the premium brands. It works fine for occasional use, but I wouldn’t expect it to hold up to the demands of a contractor who would use it daily, especially if they were moving it around from jobsite to jobsite. Even just moving mine from stored to on the bench in the shop, I have to double check all adjustments. Just used it yesterday and had to reset the 90 degree stop on the bevel, because it had gotten about a degree off. I use mine mostly for periodic home improvement tasks and could actually see a cabinet shop using it, as it works well once set up and that type of use wouldn’t be near as frequent and taxing as a construction site.

Personally, I think the Hitachi saws are probably the best bang for the buck miter saws out there. They give you 95% of the performance of DeWalt or Milwaukee at 80% of the price. If strictly needed for crosscutting, I would give a serious look at the Hitachi 8-1/2in slider. Less blade deflection, enough reach to cut pretty much anything and solid construction while being lighter and less expensive than a 10 or 12 inch saw. Doesn’t have the depth of cut to do tall crown or base molding, but would be great for crosscutting.

All that said, I feel a miter saw is more of a construction & finish carpentry tool rather than a fine woodworking one. If you have a large enough shop for a dedicated miter station, then that would be great, but most woodworkers are better served with a table saw and crosscut sled. My miter saw gets very occasional use in woodworking (probably 4-6 times in the past year), but I also do not have a table saw any more. If I didn’t already own it from doing some remodeling projects in the past, I probably wouldn’t spend the money to buy one.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2710 posts in 1314 days


#10 posted 12-26-2016 03:14 PM

I would take a look at 10” Ridgid. Its gotten fairly good reviews and IIRC is the best at dust collection.

Right now at Home Dept both the 12” DW and Ridgid are on sale for $350

Some would say a xcut sled actually excels at xcuts.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View EugdOT's profile

EugdOT

208 posts in 388 days


#11 posted 12-28-2016 01:03 AM

I went to home Depot and looked at both the 709 and 779 dewalt saws and the newer ridgid saw, the ridgid is totally redesign compared to the one I just sent out and ridgid sent me out a new replacement that I promptly returned, and got $250. Not bad considering I used it a tun in 2 years. So I was about to grab the 709 or the new ridgid when I spoke with a buddy who was just returned his 709 and he said that it doesn’t cross cut more than 10 inches even though it states more on the box? So I went online and read reviews that confirmed it, now I’m probably going with the 779? Thanks to this thread I probably would of kept the ridgid.

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