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Forum topic by Genuino posted 12-25-2016 04:37 AM 1053 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Genuino

18 posts in 385 days


12-25-2016 04:37 AM

This is the second time that happened on the same property, but on the other end of it. Was lucky enough that half a mile away from my house they are developing a new community and 9 or so acres is almost flat, but with a few trees on the ground. Stopped and ask if I can have some of it, ran home and got my chainsaw, when I got back quite a few people were chopping away :). Got a hold of a maple tree about 22-24 inches wide and 20 or so feet tall and chopped a few pieces. Also cut another maple tree, smaller, about 14-15 inches, which the first 2 or so feet from the root is spalted. Couldn’t take it all, enough to fill the back of my SUV. Lay all that on the back of my shop on the ground. Planning to cut some blanks and let it dry, bought a humidity reader by the way.
Sorry for the question but I’m new to turning, what would the right way to let it air dry? Covered or not? Shave the bark? I’ve seen people paint the sides to avoid cracking with shellac, paint and wax. What if I debark and cover the whole thing with shellac? Afraid don’t have enough space for all the wood to dry inside my shop.
Help would be greatly appreciated, don’t want to ruin all that wood.


17 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8287 posts in 1319 days


#1 posted 12-25-2016 04:45 AM

Paint or seal ASAP. Pretty sure you need to debark it as well.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5975 posts in 2032 days


#2 posted 12-25-2016 04:54 AM

I just slap some old latex paint on the ends and stick them away under the pole barn for a few years. Just keep them out of the rain and direct sunlight. And you want air circulating around them, so don’t cover. Painting the ends helps prevent checking, but it’s not 100%. As you mentioned, there are several products you can seal the ends with, but I’ve always just used cheap latex paint. Always seem to have some left over handy, and in a pinch, can get it for free from the county recycling center :)

One good thing about the white latex paint is you can take a marker and write the species and date of the blank on the side, which I’ve found quite handy.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: I never debark (unless it falls off by itself), but it certainly doesn’t hurt to do so.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Genuino

18 posts in 385 days


#3 posted 12-25-2016 06:35 AM

Thanks Fridge…...beautiful Unix, thanks for the picture, might have to build something behind shed to cover from sunlight and cover top and sides with a tarp or something, appreciated!

View Genuino's profile

Genuino

18 posts in 385 days


#4 posted 12-25-2016 07:50 AM

Another curious question (sorry to bother you guys so much), would it be ok to turn green blanks before drying? Like cilinders for spindle and blocks for bowls and so forth?

View Bruyet's profile

Bruyet

40 posts in 976 days


#5 posted 12-25-2016 01:16 PM

I love turning green wood. It is great practice, and will speed up the overall process. Rule of thumb is to leave thickness at 10% of diameter, and to be consistent with the bottom. You’ll generate bags and bags of big chips. Depending on your climate, you may need to seal them after rough turning. I’m in humid Memphis, and I never seal them. Mine are typically ready to finish turn in a couple of months. You’ll see some interesting warping as they dry.
You can also try once-turning a couple to final thickness and let it warp.

It’s free wood. Have some fun with it.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1563 days


#6 posted 12-25-2016 03:17 PM

So, the journey begins. Refer to this topic, http://lumberjocks.com/topics/194378 , for some thoughts about what is in store for your future.

I don’t know about the stability after turning green maple, but you can only find out if you try it. .............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Tim's profile

Tim

3678 posts in 1795 days


#7 posted 12-25-2016 04:58 PM

I have never turned green maple, but I would guess it’s reasonably stable from the small maple slabs I’ve saved. Like Jerry says, best way to know is to try and good thing it’s free wood. Definitely try turning some green and look up the tips on how to handle green turnings. Some people store them in garbage bags with the shavings in order to slow the drying way down.

Wax is better to seal ends with than latex paint, but it’s not perfect either, and unless you buy the emulsion stuff like Anchorseal, you have to melt wax and dip the ends in it which isn’t always easy.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1968 days


#8 posted 12-25-2016 08:18 PM

If leave your blanks longer & wider than will need and end seal what not going to turn now should be okay if stored properly. Anywhere off the ground and out of the weather (direct sunlight, rain & wind).

There is no perfect end sealer they all fail eventually for many reasons. The best & cheapest is paraffin wax if have a pan or pot & heat source to melt the wax and dip both ends. I find Gulf canning wax at many grocery stores.

By rough turning you will speed up the drying process because you decreased the thickness. I shoot for a uniform thickness anywhere from 5/8 to 1 inches thickness. Depends upon size of the blank & design. If turning hollow forms shoot for 1/4” thickness.

Good luck with it.

-- Bill

View Genuino's profile

Genuino

18 posts in 385 days


#9 posted 12-26-2016 04:57 AM

Thank you guys, amazing info! Great group of folks here :) and helpful with the newbies, hope I don’t sound dumb by asking.
I like the idea of sealing it with paraffin wax by dipping both ends, thanks wildwood, also the idea to speed up drying by rough turning and leave a healthy room to correct warping just in case. Isn’t paraffin wax used to seal blanks you get at Rockler and Woodcraft?
ANyways, does debarking helps or not? I’m assuming it keeps moisture out, correct me if I’m wrong.
Thanks again guys, I know is a long learning curve, but have to start soemwhere.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1968 days


#10 posted 12-26-2016 01:37 PM

Not sure if Wood Craft or Rockler sell paraffin wax do know depending upon frachisee they sell Green Wood Sealer or Anchor Seal. Both are wax emulsions you paint on with a brush or using a pan or pot can dip ends of blanks.

Depending upon franchise may find stuff like PEG, Pentacryl, & Wood Juice which are very expensive compared to alternatives end sealers available. These products work best if soak entire blank in product. Each one of these product have a steep a learning curve. Think Rockler provides some instructions on both PEG & Pentacryl.

Understanding why you want to end seal; wood loses moisture twelve times faster from the ends of a log versus thru sides. Left unchecked wood dries too fast and get end checking, cracking, & splitting. End sealing slows down the drying process! Anything not going to turn in next few days needs end sealing.

I too have used latex paint besides canning wax, but any oil paint or clear wood finish will work as well. End sealing is not a permanent or set it and forget it solution no matter what you use to end seal. I used to remove bark but found it just busy work and so leave it on these days.

-- Bill

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Genuino

18 posts in 385 days


#11 posted 12-27-2016 12:40 AM

Got some latex paint today for now, will seal tomorrow, raining outside, wood is covered by a tarp. Would it be ok to leave outside sealed and covered? Planning to build a big doggy house like structure behind the shop and put a portable heating/humidity unit there that I had on the basement on our other house.
With the new house wife is a little picky now about having things around the house, we moved to this gated community 2 and half years ago, still not sure about building anything more around it and garage is out of the question :).
Oh oh, just realized that my wife works for a developer/builder and they clean land everyday and I have almost an infinite source for all kinds of woods, just don’t have a place large enough to store and dry, maybe rent a space for just a few dollars a month and do that, can anyone chime in share their ideas on this? Maybe create a business out of it :), don’t know.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1968 days


#12 posted 12-27-2016 02:48 PM

I cooked a pick up load of Mulberry wood several years ago stacking on a pallet and covered with a tarp several years ago. Long story short sold a lot of pens made with that Mulberry.

Everything you need to know about drying wood right here!

https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/products/publications/several_pubs.php?grouping_id=100&header_id=p

-- Bill

View mpax356's profile

mpax356

72 posts in 2325 days


#13 posted 12-27-2016 09:24 PM

IMHO, you need to get to turning before you invest too much time and energy in storing and drying wood. Debark when feasible as it tends to encourage critters. You will have more luck putting up spindle stock, say 2” square and maybe 12” long without cracking than you will bowl blanks. Spindle stock is great for lots of projects.

-- MPax, Atlanta

View Genuino's profile

Genuino

18 posts in 385 days


#14 posted 12-28-2016 02:12 AM

Excellent point mpax356, appreciated :). Being totally new to turning, got pulled into this fever (my own term for hooked) wanted to make sure I get my own supply without spending money. Once again, have a great opportunity for a lot of free wood every week, and share it with turners around. My wife works for a builder/land development and wanted to grab and stock for the future, I’m talking about lots of it. Long process so, by the time I’m good or decent with the tools, will have a lot of dry wood. As you said, need to concentrate more on turning and the comfortable use of the tools. Already schedule to attend turning classes in January at Woodcraft, about 45 minutes from here.
Here is my very first attempted to turning,

Will hollow it out a little later, some marks and a catch or two, don’t laugh now, ha ha.

Thanks again!

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Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1563 days


#15 posted 12-28-2016 02:08 PM

Genuino, there’s nothing to laugh about. This goblet looks pretty good on shape and proportions. My only concern is the stem looks too thin to support hollowing. If you get a catch, it could snap off. If you have a steady rest, that would assure success more so than without one. Also, with a drill chuck and large Forstner bit, if you have them, drill out most of the wood, then start hollowing.

In the future, turn the outside to the stem. Hollow the inside, then go back to the stem and turn it to size. Attack the foot next, and then remove the tenon.

I just did one and that’s how I did it. My stem was a bit thicker than this one, but I still did it that way…............... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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