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Forum topic by dvhart posted 08-15-2010 02:36 AM 1583 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dvhart

111 posts in 2482 days


08-15-2010 02:36 AM

I have a Dewalt DW735 Planer that has been giving me trouble. First it left black rubber “powder” on the boards, and seemed to have some difficulty pulling boards through. The service center instructed me to unplug the machine and clean the rollers with mineral spirits. This seems to eliminate the black powder, but didn’t help much with the feed issue. It seems to be overly loud when planing even very small increments (1/64th). I use the lower cuts/inch as instructed by Dewalt for most everything. Most recently I tried to feed some 3/4” cherry through after face jointing the other side just to clean it up a bit. The boards came out burned (dark brown and glossy).

I’ve wondered if the blade-to-roller alignment is off, but I suspect I just need some instruction on what to expect from the planer in terms of needed care and maintenance. It has the original blades, but I use it very little. I’ve planed the pieces for a 7ft mahogany counter top, about 80 bdft of very rough western red cedar (and I rigorously brushed the grit out of it first), and a few sticks of cherry. Everything has been more of a challenge than I expected, and I had to make several passes taking off very little (< 1/64 per pass).

How often should I expect to have to flip/replace these $60 blades? How much should I expect to be able to remove in a pass fora 6” and 12” hardwood board (cherry, mahogany)?

Thanks for sharing your experience!

-- Darren


14 replies so far

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

607 posts in 2550 days


#1 posted 08-15-2010 02:50 AM

I’m not familiar with the Dewalt Planers…..and don’t take this the wrong way, but…. it sounds like the blades are in backwards. They should be ‘bevel up’.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3028 days


#2 posted 08-15-2010 03:33 AM

I’ve had a 735 for about 6 months and have planed quite bit of cherry (as well as some cedar) with no problems. Some of it was very rough and I didn’t have any problems feeding it. I never cut deeper than one rotation of the wheel – whatever that is. I haven’t flipped the blades yet or even looked in there so I don’t know if it’s possible to get them in backwards. I’d guess that I’ve planed at least 500 bd ft and it is just ok – not great (compared to when it was new.) There are now a few streaks in the planed boards indicating that I have some nicks in the blades. It is louder now than when it was new which I attribute to the blades getting dull.

-- Joe

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dvhart

111 posts in 2482 days


#3 posted 08-15-2010 03:56 AM

@Tony: wow, that’s a scary thought! I’ll open it up after the kids are in bed and check for proper factory installation.
@Joe: thanks for the comparison data, perhaps the mahogany did my blades in – or perhaps there something actually wrong. One turn on the wheel is 1/16 – a lot more than I ever attempt. That makes me think something is really wrong here.

-- Darren

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lew

11347 posts in 3222 days


#4 posted 08-15-2010 05:16 AM

I had trouble with stock feeding thru my 735. I waxed the surface of the “bottom plate” and that fixed it.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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dvhart

111 posts in 2482 days


#5 posted 08-15-2010 05:31 AM

@Tony: Blades are installed correctly (thank goodness) but they look pretty rough. Looks like it’s time to turn them around and see if that helps.
@Lew: I’ve waxed the bed in the past, I’ll do so again for good measure.
Thanks for the thoughts everyone, I’ll reply back with the results of the above.

-- Darren

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3028 days


#6 posted 08-15-2010 06:34 AM

I just remembered that there was ONE time that I had a feeding problem. I was planing a board that had a big time twist in it (I had it screwed to a sled) and about halfway through the thickness was greater than I thought it was going to be and the board stopped feeding until I raised the carriage. The width of the cut at that point was only about 3 inches (out of an 8 inch board) and I think the rollers just didn’t have enough stock to get a grip. It left a black mark on the board, but it fed ok after that.

If turning the blades over doesn’t help consider the following:

My previous planer was a Delta 12 inch that developed feeding problems late in its life and I finally determined it was bad rollers. It didn’t have many hours on it but it sat around in my shop many years when I didn’t have time to do woodworking. I think the surface just got age hardened and would slip with light cuts. If I made deeper cuts it worked better.

The rollers self adjust, but you might want to shoot some compressed area up on both ends of the rollers to clean out any sawdust that may have accumulated in there. I haven’t had the Dewalt apart, but it probably is similar to the Delta where the ends of the rollers are supported in steel blocks that ride up an down in a channel. Springs push the rollers down agains the stock.

-- Joe

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dvhart

111 posts in 2482 days


#7 posted 08-16-2010 01:59 AM

Well after knocking the corners off a few knuckles, the alan-wrench, stripping the sockets of two of the planer knife bolts, and going to unusual lengths to remove said bolts, not only has DeWalt also realized that alan-heads are a “bad idea” here and have replaced them with Torx heads in the parts catalog, but they are back-ordered on the hardware bag until the first week of September. Sigh…

-- Darren

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3028 days


#8 posted 08-16-2010 05:08 AM

I’d check a store like Fastenal.

-- Joe

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dvhart

111 posts in 2482 days


#9 posted 08-16-2010 05:23 AM

@Joe: Thanks for the tip, this looks to be the screw/bolt/socket I need:
http://www.fastenal.com/web/products/detail.ex?sku=39910&ucst=t
I’m going to try for one locally and failing that will order a couple of these to tide me over until Dewalt can send me the full Torx T30 set. Or maybe I’ll just replace all of them with this and buy a better alan-driver…

-- Darren

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3028 days


#10 posted 08-16-2010 05:37 AM

Wow – does the Dewalt really use 1 inch long screws? Seems awfully long. Try to buy high strength screws if they are available. Also lube them before installation so they won’t seize. I like lubriplate grease for stuff like this.

For sure you need a quality wrench. I’m surprised that DW didn’t design these to use the accessory T handle wrench that comes with the planer.

-- Joe

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dvhart

111 posts in 2482 days


#11 posted 08-16-2010 05:11 PM

@Joe: They are 12mm (1/2”), that picture on the site is used for all the bolts of that type. That bolt was fairly high strength – they didn’t have a higher grade with the same head. Would you recommend a different grade? It was the T-Handle wrench that I used (and stripped). Part of the problem (in retrospect) was probably all the burned/glazed wood dust that got embedded in the sockets, preventing the wrench from fully seating. Even after taking a brass brush to them I wasn’t able to get all the debris out of the sockets. Thanks for the lubriplate tip.

-- Darren

View GregP's profile

GregP

154 posts in 2344 days


#12 posted 08-16-2010 07:25 PM

I have this planer and personally the only problem I’ve had with it is the blades gum up and dull a bit. It sounds like there is something wrong with yours, did you get a warranty?

-- Greg P, Washington State, http://heirloomfurniture.weebly.com/

View dvhart's profile

dvhart

111 posts in 2482 days


#13 posted 08-16-2010 07:46 PM

@GregP: The blades had a lot of glaze on them and I expect the mahogany counter-top was harder on them than I realized. Still, it isn’t performing as I’d expect. I’m going to try again with the new edges and a waxed table. If that doesn’t resolve it, I’ll be taking it into the service center. Unfortunately, I am a hobbyist and have had very little time to work with the machine, so it’s 1 year free service warranty was up before I even got that counter-top, but I believe it should still be under the 3 year limited warranty. I have some due diligence to perform before I’ll feel confident arguing a defect with the service center.

-- Darren

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2128 posts in 3391 days


#14 posted 08-16-2010 07:51 PM

As a side note; I hone my blades about every 100 BFT and clean them with bit cleaner. This helps to give smooth surface and prolong the cutter life. I have two sets of cutters and use one for rough cut lumber then change them out to do my finish cuts. I know this seems a bit excessive but it more then makes up for the time spent to get a nice smooth finish. I have a 20” Grizzly so it may be easier to change cutters then the DeWalt altogether it takes me about 30 min to make the change over My blades are $169.95 so I want them to last me as long as they can.

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