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Forum topic by xeddog posted 12-22-2016 10:51 PM 1095 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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xeddog

173 posts in 2847 days


12-22-2016 10:51 PM

I am referring to those rubber, or other material, mats used to put on your bench that keep workpieces that are being sanded from running all over the table top. All of my work surfaces are covered with Formica, and so far I have not found anything that works. I have tried several of those perforated rubber mats, solid rubber, fiber mats, and probably somethings I have forgotten. But they all make things worse. I have a lot less chasing to do when I just put the wood onto the Formica surface and go to town on it.

What, if anything, do you use to keep your workpieces from running around on your tables?

Wayne


18 replies so far

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JoeinGa

7727 posts in 1847 days


#1 posted 12-22-2016 10:55 PM

I bought a roll of this rubber mesh shelf liner from WallyWorld 4 or 5 years ago. It works pretty good for me. And I’ve only used about 1/3 of the roll.
.
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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eflanders

219 posts in 1691 days


#2 posted 12-22-2016 11:16 PM

I use the same as JoeinGa.

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MrUnix

6021 posts in 2039 days


#3 posted 12-22-2016 11:19 PM

That stuff Joe pointed out does work well… and you can get it just about anywhere for pretty cheap. But it can be torn up fairly easily if you aren’t careful. Try looking around next time you are at the BORG… as drawer and shelf liner material. Some free options are: Treadmill belts, old rubber mouse pads and old rubber door mats. The treadmill option will also land you a nice variable speed DC motor, power supply and controller that you can re-purpose for lots of other stuff. It also gets you a ton of hardware and metal tubing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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oldwood

112 posts in 1084 days


#4 posted 12-22-2016 11:37 PM

I don’t have formica work surfaces but the best thing I have found is carpet padding. Find it on the curb waiting for garbage collection.

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clin

754 posts in 836 days


#5 posted 12-22-2016 11:41 PM

I use the shelf liner Joe mentioned. But, I do rinse it after using. Once it gets a lot of dust on it, it still gets slick when I happen to being using it on a melamine topped outfeed table I occasionally use for sanding.

Formica is slick like melamine and I don’t think there is anything that won’t slide on it once you get some dust under it.

What about a temporary work surface. Like a large board with something non-slick on it that you can clamp to your Formica topped bench? Just thinking out loud.

-- Clin

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MrUnix

6021 posts in 2039 days


#6 posted 12-22-2016 11:44 PM

I don t have formica work surfaces but the best thing I have found is carpet padding. Find it on the curb waiting for garbage collection.
- oldwood

Dang, I forgot about that stuff.. and I have a couple of rolls of it out in the shed! It does work well, and you can use it for all sorts of useful things. If you can’t find it on the side of the road after an install, if you have any new home construction around you, you can get all you would ever need for several lifetimes.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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BurlyBob

5072 posts in 2106 days


#7 posted 12-23-2016 01:53 AM

I’ve got both the carpet pad and shelf liner. They both work great!

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 742 days


#8 posted 12-23-2016 02:01 AM

I have been using a piece of the puzzle piece anti fatigue floor mat. super grippy and tough.

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papadan

3584 posts in 3209 days


#9 posted 12-23-2016 02:13 AM

I drilled some small holes and just drop in dowel pieces to stop anything from sliding when routing or sanding.

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xeddog

173 posts in 2847 days


#10 posted 12-23-2016 03:51 AM

JoeinGA – I’ve tried several of that type of mat. Light Brown, Dark Brown, Black . . . But I will have to look for the blue stuff. :-)

MrUnix – I have tried stuff called shelf liner, drawer liner, toolbox liner, and even some stuff sold as a sanding mat by (I think) Rockler. It all just makes things worse. But treadmill belts??? Hmmmm.

oldwood – carpet padding!!! I think I even have a small piece of that laying around that I can try.

DirtyMike – I have some of those puzzle piece mats on my shop floor. But there are different grades of those mats from really lightweight cheap crap (like my HF stuff) to more expensive not cheap crap. I also have one of those other solid cushions that I might try.

papadan – I’m not ready to drill holes in my counter/table tops.

Thanks for the input

Wayne

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JoeinGa

7727 posts in 1847 days


#11 posted 12-23-2016 12:39 PM

Wayne:
If you’ve tried several different colors of the mesh shelf liner and are not happy with it, dont bother looking for the blue. It’s all pretty much the same stuff. The picture I posted is one I found in a Google image search and it showed the mesh.

But the actual reason I’m responding again is about the folks that pick up carpet padding from the curb … I certainly hope you make sure the reason your neighbors pulled up the old carpet and padding ISNT because they have dogs in the house. That old padding could stink up your shop something horrible !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1276 posts in 760 days


#12 posted 12-23-2016 03:03 PM

xeddog,

I really like clin’s idea of a separate sanding work surface that sets atop the work bench. It could be a piece of MDF (for its flatness) cut the width of the workbench. A pair of cleats like those on a bench hook (but both cleats mounted under the MDF surface) could lock the auxiliary sanding surface to the two long edges of the workbench. A solid router mat glued to the MDF with contact cement would provide a soft work surface for sanding. The sanding surface could be clamped on one end to keep it from sliding along the length of the workbench or a alignment hole could be drilled through a cleat that is attached to the sanding surface for a dowel that would slip through this hole and catch a mating hole drilled into the edge of the workbench.

The only problem I can foresee with this solution is that the sanding surface must be stored when not in use.

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splintergroup

1706 posts in 1063 days


#13 posted 12-23-2016 03:41 PM

As stated, what ever you use will begin to slip when dusty.

For a while I used the matting JoeInGa shows, works great except it begins to slide around when dusty. I used spray adhesive (3M “77”) and sprayed a piece of 3/4” melamine, waited a minute, then placed the matting on top. Works well! Alternatively I have used door mats. They have the mass to keep from moving and bunching up. You just need to find the right material so your project won’t slide on the surface (and you still need to wipe off the dust on occasion.

What is great about the matting is it has the holes so if you spray-glue it down to a piece of perforated masonite (used for those metal hanger hooks), it makes the beginning of a fine sanding box. You add a chamber box underneath for a dust vacuum, The matting has the holes to allow the dust to flow through. A sanding “station” is great to have if you have a dust collector and the space.

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OnhillWW

112 posts in 1072 days


#14 posted 12-23-2016 04:08 PM

I happened onto bulk runner carpet at the local BORG. It has rubber backing and tight nylon indoor outdoor type woven top. Buy it by the foot. I purchased a 10 foot length and cut sections as needed. Rubber side down stays in place and provides protection for workpieces that are in the final stages of preparation. Carpet side down, secured to my work top via clamps keeps pieces in place for sanding. I keep a hierarchy of these as they wear or collect contaminants and they see duty for gluing or finishing etc. I have tried rubber pucks, drawer liners etc and find I prefer these but YMMV. Worth a shot as they are very inexpensive and pretty darn durable.

View xeddog's profile

xeddog

173 posts in 2847 days


#15 posted 12-23-2016 05:49 PM

... I certainly hope you make sure the reason your neighbors pulled up the old carpet and padding ISNT because they have dogs in the house. That old padding could stink up your shop something horrible !
- JoeinGa

EEEEWWWWW!!!!! And the stink would only be half of it. EW! EW! EW!


xeddog,
The only problem I can foresee with this solution is that the sanding surface must be stored when not in use.
- JBrow

I would LOVE to have a downdraft table, but my garage workshop is already over-crowded.

... Alternatively I have used door mats.
- splintergroup

Interesing.


I happened onto bulk runner carpet at the local BORG.
- OnhillWW

Also interesting.

Y’all have given me several alteratives that I can look into, Thanks evertone,

Wayne

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