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Forum topic by dbray45 posted 12-21-2016 01:29 PM 502 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dbray45

3258 posts in 2407 days


12-21-2016 01:29 PM

https://www.thisoldhouse.com/more/creating-next-skilled-generation

I saw this in TOH.

A few years ago I tried to start a furniture building class in the school system that I work. I was told that the State Board of Education has determined that this is not a career path and without credit potential, they could not fund it.

Guess these folks are wrong.

Then again – for your kids, may want to look into this.

-- David in Damascus, MD


14 replies so far

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WillliamMSP

1080 posts in 1234 days


#1 posted 12-21-2016 01:39 PM

Yeah, I saw that on TOH, too. Let’s hope it goes somewhere. I think that it will. With the rising cost of tuition (that’s a bubble that’s gotta burst sometime soon, preferably before either of my children needs to make a decision on college) and with no guarantee of a job in your chosen field, I would think that more young people would be open to a job in the trades.

-- Practice makes less sucky. (Bill, Minneapolis, MN)

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dbray45

3258 posts in 2407 days


#2 posted 12-21-2016 02:02 PM

That is why I posted it here – to get people talking about it.

Go Mike Rowe and Norm!

-- David in Damascus, MD

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dbray45

3258 posts in 2407 days


#3 posted 12-21-2016 02:06 PM

At one time, 75% of the costs of college was paid by government contracts. I am not going to say who changed what because that will turn this political – not what I want to do and it doesn’t matter.

We need balance brought back – Skills, trades, college, all of it.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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Brit

7019 posts in 2473 days


#4 posted 12-21-2016 03:01 PM

That’s the same here too David. Slowly but surely, apprenticeship schemes are returning now but nowhere near as many as there used to be.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: "If you think something can't be done, don't interrrupt man who is doing it."

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dbray45

3258 posts in 2407 days


#5 posted 12-21-2016 03:15 PM

It is really kind of sad, I meet people all of the time that want me to do stuff – like put up a board, adjust a hinge, something that takes them a minute or two to do—and they can’t.

I knew this guy with 2 advanced degrees and he couldn’t replace a flapper in his water closet (toilet for all normal folk).

One of the reasons I like this place – seeing younger folk getting involved in this. It is promising.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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dbray45

3258 posts in 2407 days


#6 posted 12-21-2016 03:22 PM

Bill – I started out as an auto mechanic (before you needed a degree in computer engineering), then got my Master’s Licence in HVAC and a 1st class Stationary Engineer’s License after the Navy.

The trades got me where I am now. The only trouble was that I was OJT taught and non union and there was no viable retirement in those fields unless you were union.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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rhybeka

3009 posts in 2751 days


#7 posted 12-21-2016 03:47 PM

I wish I would’ve gone into a trade field in HS – our trade school was very limited though – auto,HVAC,cosmetology, and culinary. I didn’t want any of those. would’ve been a decent framer or trim carpenter. I think I would’ve dealt ok with the bias in the field. Oh well. I’m where I’m at for a reason. I saw that commercial spot on the HGTV channel I think and thought “way to go guys!” I’m with you Dave. Quite surprising the number of folks even in my generation that can’t do basic home improvements for themselves. I can’t remember the statistic Mike Rowe threw out. Something like 60% of folks hire it out?

-- Beka/Becky - aspiring jill of all trades, still learning to not read the directions.

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youdidntbuildthat72

18 posts in 151 days


#8 posted 01-10-2017 02:53 PM

they used to have trade schools called tech schools locally but they learned that they could make more money if they tried to be colleges and tied to a local college. So locally they all sold out and are now run by local state colleges so they can make money instead of teach an actual trade.
Why someone wanting to learn how to be an auto mechanic needs to take psychology or history is beyond my comprehension. Its so the so called tech schools can force you to take more classes so they can make more money.
If someone would open up a tech school or trade school that only taught how to do that one thing and nothing else then that would be wonderful.

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dbray45

3258 posts in 2407 days


#9 posted 01-10-2017 08:24 PM

Start putting it together, you might have something.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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Dustin

250 posts in 371 days


#10 posted 01-11-2017 12:15 AM



they used to have trade schools called tech schools locally but they learned that they could make more money if they tried to be colleges and tied to a local college. So locally they all sold out and are now run by local state colleges so they can make money instead of teach an actual trade.
Why someone wanting to learn how to be an auto mechanic needs to take psychology or history is beyond my comprehension. Its so the so called tech schools can force you to take more classes so they can make more money.
If someone would open up a tech school or trade school that only taught how to do that one thing and nothing else then that would be wonderful.

- youdidntbuildthat72

Yeah, I hated gen ed requirements. I’m a math nerd…making me take “liberal arts” courses isn’t going to make me more relatable, just more insufferable.

I thought, for a while, maybe it’s so professors can keep their agendas full? But the professor at my school typically taught the classes to majors in that subject. Gen ed level stuff was typically taught by less senior staff. Oh well, guess you have to get something out of that philosophy degree :p.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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corelz125

252 posts in 606 days


#11 posted 01-11-2017 01:16 AM

People now seem to look down on trades people as being less educated and being low class. Also a percent of younger kids don’t like to get their hands dirty or do manual labor.

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dbray45

3258 posts in 2407 days


#12 posted 01-11-2017 12:22 PM

There is a real peer pressure thing there. I have to admit that when I was in the HVAC trades, I felt that customers spoke to me like understanding English was a challenge for me. Even had a person ask me what sheepskin was on my wall to counter what their Engineers thought was the problem (that they were not solving). All I had was a Master’s HVAC license. When I solved what they couldn’t, they were genuinely pissed. It wasn’t until I got my degree that all that went away.

People, when you tell them you are or were in the trades, speak down to you, sometimes in a very condescending way. When you inform them that you in fact have a degree (graduated cum laude), some have even apologized to me. They thought I was one of “those” people. Some of the worst offenders are people with 1 or 2 semesters in college and they feel that they have a degree. When you ask them when they graduated, they cannot answer.

One of the things about the trades, you are a ‘working” person. Once you get to a level of master craftsman, your attitude changes and people treat you like the professional that you are.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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corelz125

252 posts in 606 days


#13 posted 01-11-2017 08:03 PM

All people see are the dirty clothes and work boots and assume the type of person i am. I’m sure I can do most of the work they do but i’m certain most can’t do my job.

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Ocelot

1586 posts in 2268 days


#14 posted 01-11-2017 08:15 PM

Every year in my church, they honor the high school grads and have them walk by the mic and say what their plans are. Out of 20 or 30 in a batch, I’ve never heard one say “I’m going to be a meat cutter” or something like that, and yet meat cutters, carpenters, mechanics etc. come from somewhere. Apparently you have to fail at something else first. That’s a pity.

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