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added a 2hp delta "cabinet" saw, I have questions about it

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Forum topic by , posted 08-12-2010 03:55 PM 2954 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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,

2387 posts in 3014 days


08-12-2010 03:55 PM

I added a 3rd TS, we currently have the Ridgid 3660 and 4511 (granite top). Both Ridgids work nice. I have always wanted to get a nice cabinet saw though, either Delta or Powermatic someday. Couple days ago I picked up a delta cabinet saw with 32” unifence. The shop it was in had dim lighting and hard to check and I could not tell much but it was wired 220. Plus I figured at 300.00 it was a decent deal and it appeared to run smooth and strong, it just hummed with little to no vibration. It felt substantial and was on a nice “kickstand” type mobile base. I had been looking to swap out my 3660 because of poor dust collection and motor hanging out the back. Small issues I know.

Questions:

I took the Delta apart when I got home to clean it all up and apply lubricant to the hand cranks/mechanical areas. The unit was very dirty and dust filled. Upon taking it apart, I discovered the trunnions mounted to the top. I thought with cabinet saws the trunnion is mounted to the cabinet. Also, I was thinking it is probably a 3 hp motor but it states “2 hp” and that it is 230v at 8.6 amps. Both the Ridgid saws is listed as being 6.5 amps at 220v or 13 amps at 110. So how does this compare with the Ridgid saw. I think my 3 hp Grizzly shaper is listed as 16 amps. I was actually looking for a minimal of a 3 hp saw. Any clarification on motor specs here is appreciated.

I like the 3 hp or larger rating because anything I throw at my shaper, the shaper never gets bogged down and just seems very powerful, whereas both of my Ridgid TS will bogg down at times which means the user has to slow down feed rate, etc…

So can anyone give me any information about this saw. It runs good and I am going to clean it up and lubricate it nicely so it should be like new, it will be like a new saw when I am done with the restoration. It is mostly all in good shape anyway. I am currently on the fence about keeping it or selling it for 300 or maybe 400 or whatever it is worth.

I will say it seems built very well, it says “made in USA” and all the wrench sizes I used to take apart was 3/8”, 1/2”, 9/16 and 5/8”. That is different because most things I work on requires metric.

Thanks for all the help,

Jerry

P.S. when we get fully set up with our new shop I plan to post pics and such. We have been very busy between set up, my full time job and we have kept doing custom jobs one after another.

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16 replies so far

View NathanAllen's profile

NathanAllen

376 posts in 2611 days


#1 posted 08-12-2010 05:50 PM

You actually bought a Delta “Hybrid,” almost certainly a 36-751. They were manufactured in the 90’s to compete with DeWalt and Jet hybrid saws.

The good news is $300 is a decent price for one.

The bad news is they are a disguised contractor saw. The biggest advantage is that they have better dust control and you’ve just picked up a decent fence. The downside is that the trunions are difficult to align. Functionally it will be very similar to the R4511, minus the riving knife and cabinet trunions. The motor is a bit beefier, but otherwise a solid saw and a good purchase at the price.

If you want a cost effective cabinet saw you should look at Grizzly, otherwise depending on the production environment I’d probably unload the TS3650 since dust control is going to be your biggest enemy if multiple people are working.

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,

2387 posts in 3014 days


#2 posted 08-12-2010 05:58 PM

Thanks Nathan, that answers much of my question. I do think it is a nice saw and I am confident that I will not loose any money. I will enjoy cleaning it up and playing with it. I will just keep it until someday I run across a good deal on a true 3 hp cabinet saw.

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,

2387 posts in 3014 days


#3 posted 08-12-2010 06:44 PM

Using the model number from Nathan, I am sure that is the correct saw. Still think I paid about right on the saw but not knowing much about Delta’s history I was not clear as to what I was purchasing. I do believe the saw will be fun to play with and I will find something to throw at it.

contractorsawinabox… WantsaBeAUnisaw… LOL :)

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View sawblade1's profile

sawblade1

754 posts in 2494 days


#4 posted 08-12-2010 06:59 PM

I have a 1977 Delta jointer I picked up for $100 and it runs as good as day one!!! although small it is a whopper in weight at around 400# It is just like their newer tools great quality and known to last. congratulations on your latest score :)

-- Proverbs Ch:3 vs 5,6,7 Trust in the lord with all thine heart and lean not unto your own understanding but in all your ways aknowledge him and he shall direct your path elmerthomas81@neo.rr.com

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,

2387 posts in 3014 days


#5 posted 08-13-2010 04:25 PM

I cleaned up the saw last night, ready to put it all back together. It looks really nice now. I lubricated everything and now it all works very well. The top had surface rust, I cleaned it off with some WD-40. It shined up really nice.

Does anyone have any ideas about what to put on the cast iron top to preserve the top after it has been recently cleaned. I hate to put all of that effort into it and not protect it somehow. I just cannot remember what it is woodworkers put on their TS tops.

Does anyone else know anything about the 36-751 or have any experience with it. I found someone online say they could cut through 12/4 maple with their 36-751 but I am skeptical about that statement. I do think it has a stronger motor then what is on the Ridgid TS and with a good blade then that might be possible.

I am considering selling the saw, but am on the fence. Does anyone have any idea what the saw is really worth in “really good” condition?

Thanks for any advice I can get.
Jerry

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View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3130 days


#6 posted 08-13-2010 08:20 PM

I use Johnson’s Paste Wax (the stuff in the big yellow can) on my table saw and other cast iron tools … inexpensive and does a great job protecting them.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2317 days


#7 posted 08-13-2010 08:27 PM

It’s my experience that, in 10” professional table saws, you are in compromise territory until you go to 5hp. I don’t mean that as an elitist statement, it’s just the result of my learning.

Perusing Craigslist nearly daily I am finding killer deals on pro saws in the mid and higher hundreds. If you can spot yourself some profit on the resale of this saw, paying for your efforts to get it squeaky clean and buff, you’ll be closer to a saw you’ll depend on the rest of your life.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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,

2387 posts in 3014 days


#8 posted 08-13-2010 11:40 PM

Lee, I would agree that I should get a “pro saw” sometime down the line as I intend on building cabinets for a very long time into the future. I have considered listing the saw on CL for 600.00 and just see what happens. I do feel it is worth more then what I paid for it, especially after cleaning it up and tuning everything up. Well, we will see.

Also, thanks for the Johnson’s Paste wax idea. Not sure where to look for that at though.

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View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3130 days


#9 posted 08-13-2010 11:51 PM

Jerry—- Some grocery stores and home centers carry it. Here, I buy it at a chain store called Farm-and-Fleet.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2881 posts in 2994 days


#10 posted 08-14-2010 01:36 AM

I second the Johnson’s Paste wax. I always pick it up at Lowe’s.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View rhett's profile

rhett

734 posts in 3134 days


#11 posted 08-14-2010 01:04 PM

Boeing T9 is my choice for rust prevention. I spray it on any metal that may be prone to rust and I have never had any surface rust issues. Paste wax is great too but I like the spray on wipe off application of the T9.

As far as trying to equate the hp of a saw to the level of professionalism it will produce has little to no merit IMHO. A high quality sharp blade and stout fence are the only two requirements for dependable and repeatable cuts.

-- Doubt kills more dreams than failure.

View Florida_Jim's profile

Florida_Jim

83 posts in 2344 days


#12 posted 08-14-2010 01:37 PM

I’ve been using “Johnsons paste wax” for forty years. Great product.

View Bob42's profile

Bob42

456 posts in 3257 days


#13 posted 08-14-2010 01:48 PM

I used to use Johnsons paste was and it worked well but for a couple of years now I have been using liquid carnuba car wax. It gets in the pores of the cast iron better and lasts much longer. Good luck on your new saw.

-- Bob K. East Northport, NY

View handivance's profile

handivance

1 post in 2309 days


#14 posted 08-14-2010 02:02 PM

I would sell the saw at this point since you can probably make a profit. There are good deals out there on cabinet saws. We just picked up a Jet 3hp w/50” commercial fence for $400.00! I you start looking at saws with bigger motors, just be aware that many of those are wired for 3 phase current. One more suggestion—be careful about using WD40 on woodworking surfaces—it can “contaminate” your wood with petroleum deposits and wreak havoc with your finish. I would clean the WD40 off of your tool surfaces with laquer thinner and then wax them or better yet use a spray product like “Topcoat”.

View ,'s profile

,

2387 posts in 3014 days


#15 posted 08-16-2010 10:10 PM

Thanks a lot for all of the comments on this forum. I cleaned that Delta up, made it look new and we just sold it. I listed both the Delta and the Ridgid r4511 on CL, figured we would keep and use which ever saw did not sell because I liked both saws and did not really care which one did not sell. Well, the Delta sold in about 3 hous. I sold the saw because we did not need 3 table saws and the Delta was not exactly what I was looking for.

The paste wax idea worked great, I cleaned up all of my other tops and waxed them as well.

Thanks,

Jerry

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