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Forum topic by Dee1 posted 12-20-2016 12:49 AM 821 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dee1

271 posts in 1724 days


12-20-2016 12:49 AM

Hi guys and gals
I am currently building the Truck and low bed trailer, and I must ask for some help or suggestions
I am trying to glue the trailer floor to the deck over the rear wheels.
the angle cut is 21.5 on the two joints and I have been so far unable to figure out how to clamp them together to get a good solid glue joint>

Thanks for any help with this I tried sever old tricks but none have worked yet?


16 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1769 posts in 2152 days


#1 posted 12-20-2016 01:49 AM

Use angled cauls like those shown in the picture below. There are various ways to achieve this. You can glue the cauls to plywood then clamp the plywood to the workpiece. It’s also possible to glue them right to your project with PVA and a piece of paper between the caul and the wood. The paper allows the parts to be separated easily.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View tealetm's profile

tealetm

87 posts in 693 days


#2 posted 12-20-2016 02:37 AM

Have you tried tape?

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1310 posts in 656 days


#3 posted 12-20-2016 03:44 AM


Have you tried tape?

- tealetm

tealetm has it all taped up. I have found that for most mitre joints a good dose of tape (blue tape not duct) will seal the deal. If you need strength in the joint try, re-enforcing with dowels or splines (even slivers will do). Even a 1/16” or 1/8” dowel does wonders.

PS. Nice looking cab!!!....

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View crowie's profile

crowie

2033 posts in 1786 days


#4 posted 12-20-2016 08:43 AM

Just a thought…would you be able to biscuit join those pieces????

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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Dutchy

2560 posts in 2004 days


#5 posted 12-20-2016 12:20 PM

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

170 posts in 1309 days


#6 posted 12-20-2016 02:43 PM

Funny you should ask. I built that same model and a dump truck a couple of years ago. To “clamp” those joints, I just put a couple of dabs of CA glue at the ends of the pieces. Then, I spread the PVA glue between those dots. When I pushed the together, the CA set in 10 seconds and held the joint in place until the PVA added the stronger joint that I wanted. I’ve used this method several times now for tricky joints and it’s always worked well.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View DS's profile

DS

2822 posts in 2256 days


#7 posted 12-20-2016 02:50 PM

If you are building up your tool set, these are really handy.
Mine don’t see a lot of action, but when they do, they are invaluable.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Dee1's profile

Dee1

271 posts in 1724 days


#8 posted 12-20-2016 04:11 PM

Hey this is a great forum what a great bunch of responses
I have never used the blue tape, and I tries it and I think we have a winner. thank all you guys all great ideas.
Thanks again
Dee

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1310 posts in 656 days


#9 posted 12-20-2016 04:41 PM


....
I have never used the blue tape, ....

- Dee1


Just don’t be too stingy with the blue tape… especially on the underside (not like I have tried to draw)...

Lay the tape sticky side up (unless you want to stick your bench)... but the mitre ends together (flat)... add glue… draw mitre joint together… secure/tigten with blue tape on the other side (preferably “loosely” placed before glue up… and pulling the joint together)....
Just watch out for sharp edges that may cut the tape if pulling TOO tight. It is quite surprising the pressure you can apply (within reason).

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2953 posts in 548 days


#10 posted 12-20-2016 04:57 PM

I also had the same question here all my responses I got back

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/167810

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View crowie's profile

crowie

2033 posts in 1786 days


#11 posted 12-20-2016 11:31 PM



If you are building up your tool set, these are really handy.
Mine don t see a lot of action, but when they do, they are invaluable.

- DS

What brand are they and Were did they come from please “DS” .... thank you

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View htl's profile

htl

3139 posts in 995 days


#12 posted 12-21-2016 12:15 AM

Funny you should ask. I built that same model and a dump truck a couple of years ago. To “clamp” those joints, I just put a couple of dabs of CA glue at the ends of the pieces. Then, I spread the PVA glue between those dots. When I pushed the together, the CA set in 10 seconds and held the joint in place until the PVA added the stronger joint that I wanted. I ve used this method several times now for tricky joints and it s always worked well.

- gwilki

gwilki I’ve been using this trick more and more on my builds to add strength [wood glue] and speed [super glue] it’s a winning combination.. *And after it was dry I still drilled it for two small dowels just to be safe, mine has a split track so felt like it might need it.. *

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1503 posts in 1223 days


#13 posted 12-21-2016 03:03 AM

How about a pair custom corner clamp that are made from scraps to hold the 2 pieces at the correct angle. See this video by Izzy Swan to see what I mean. Yours would be made for the angles of you project rather than 90 degrees of course. It doesn’t have to be as elaborate or reusable as his but you just need one on both sides to hold them at the correct angle while you apply pressure to the glue joint. I you add a block to the clamp you may also be able to use a regular F clamp to apply a little pressure.

I would also add a spline to the joints. Gluing end grain to end grain will not hold very well no matter how perfect you are able to clamp it and a spline will give you side grain glue surfaces to greatly increase the strength of the joint. The spline will also make it so it is less likely to slide apart while clamping it.

Nice work by the way.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View DS's profile

DS

2822 posts in 2256 days


#14 posted 12-21-2016 06:29 PM

Crowie, now you’re making me scratch my head as to where I got mine from. I think I found them on Amazon for a discounted price.

The image I posted was from Woodcraft and is a bit more money.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View crowie's profile

crowie

2033 posts in 1786 days


#15 posted 12-21-2016 09:49 PM



Crowie, now you re making me scratch my head as to where I got mine from. I think I found them on Amazon for a discounted price.

The image I posted was from Woodcraft and is a bit more money.

- DS

Thank you sir..
Hopefully no splinters just sawdust..
Happy Christmas from the Great Southern Land…

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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