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New to wood working, 3/4 plywood aquarium stand

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Forum topic by FuNnY718 posted 12-18-2016 08:36 PM 2191 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FuNnY718

12 posts in 364 days


12-18-2016 08:36 PM

Hey folks happy holidays, I’m new to wood working and would like to try my hand at a diy plywood stand as I don’t think for a 60g 48×24” I would need to over kill and have 2×4. Questions I have do I need a front center support, do I just butt joint the stand. I would like to get away with pocket hole screws cause I’m new. If any one can recommend any books DVDs or has a sketchup file of how the framing should be that would be great thnx a ton.


34 replies so far

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

812 posts in 1281 days


#1 posted 12-18-2016 09:19 PM

Water weighs 8 lbs. per gallon, so a 60 gal tank will weigh 480 lbs. in just water, plus the tank itself. You don’t want to “under-build.”

3/4 ply can do it, but you’ll have to design it well. Have you got a sketch or anything? (even a rough sketch on paper, scanned and uploaded would help us help you.)

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 409 days


#2 posted 12-18-2016 09:31 PM

I had a 48×24x24, 120 gal on a stand I made out of 3/4” red oak, standard cabinet construction. I had 250lb live rock in it also.
I had no problems with it.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

871 posts in 1792 days


#3 posted 12-18-2016 10:06 PM

OK, I could Google it, but perhaps I could get mrbob to enlighten me. What the heck is a 250lb “live rock”? All the rocks around here have long since passed away.

Eager to learn something new today!

View FuNnY718's profile

FuNnY718

12 posts in 364 days


#4 posted 12-18-2016 10:14 PM



OK, I could Google it, but perhaps I could get mrbob to enlighten me. What the heck is a 250lb “live rock”? All the rocks around here have long since passed away.

Eager to learn something new today!

- Kazooman


lol thank you. here is a quick run down of live rock

Live rock becomes the main biological nitrification base or biological filter of a saltwater aquarium, while at the same time enhances the look of the aquarium and provides shelter for the inhabitants.

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FuNnY718

12 posts in 364 days


#5 posted 12-18-2016 10:16 PM



I had a 48×24x24, 120 gal on a stand I made out of 3/4” red oak, standard cabinet construction. I had 250lb live rock in it also.
I had no problems with it.

- mrbob


can you point me in the right direction of standard cabinet construction references?

View FuNnY718's profile

FuNnY718

12 posts in 364 days


#6 posted 12-18-2016 10:16 PM



Water weighs 8 lbs. per gallon, so a 60 gal tank will weigh 480 lbs. in just water, plus the tank itself. You don t want to “under-build.”

3/4 ply can do it, but you ll have to design it well. Have you got a sketch or anything? (even a rough sketch on paper, scanned and uploaded would help us help you.)

- jerryminer


thank you.

View Clk51212's profile

Clk51212

34 posts in 412 days


#7 posted 12-18-2016 10:17 PM

Live rock is used in saltwater set ups. I have built over 15 stands from 55 to 180 gallon. The 180 had over 150lbs of sand and 200 lbs rock with a 50 gal sump filter below it. Always built mine with 2×6 top fails for 6ft long tanks and 2×4 bottom rail with 2×6 legs on four corners. Then skinned them with 1/2 ply or tongue and grove pine depending on the look you like. Make sure you joint and square the tops and bottoms for the rail they need to be perfectly flat

View FuNnY718's profile

FuNnY718

12 posts in 364 days


#8 posted 12-18-2016 10:20 PM



Live rock is used in saltwater set ups. I have built over 15 stands from 55 to 180 gallon. The 180 had over 150lbs of sand and 200 lbs rock with a 50 gal sump filter below it. Always built mine with 2×6 top fails for 6ft long tanks and 2×4 bottom rail with 2×6 legs on four corners. Then skinned them with 1/2 ply or tongue and grove pine depending on the look you like. Make sure you joint and square the tops and bottoms for the rail they need to be perfectly flat

- Clk51212

thnx bud im trying to give it a go with just plywood. but thank you again for the reply.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#9 posted 12-18-2016 10:23 PM

Built one for my son a few years ago… believe it was a 150 gallon or so (it was big!). Used regular 2x stuff for a box frame and skinned with T1-11 ply. Pretty much what Clk describes above.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Clk51212's profile

Clk51212

34 posts in 412 days


#10 posted 12-18-2016 10:23 PM

Pocket screws wood been fine for the legs. You can do a but joiint on the rails if you use 2×6 top rail you wouldn’t need a center support

View FuNnY718's profile

FuNnY718

12 posts in 364 days


#11 posted 12-18-2016 10:24 PM



Built one for my son a few years ago… believe it was a 150 gallon or so (it was big!). Used regular 2x stuff for a box frame and skinned with T1-11 ply. Pretty much what Clk describes above. I

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

thank you brad for the info really appreciate it.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

871 posts in 1792 days


#12 posted 12-18-2016 10:28 PM

I admit, I had to Google live rock. I knew it was used in salt water aquaria, but didn’t know the term.

As far as the “just plywood” build. I am not certain what you mean here. You will need a sturdy frame to support the weight. You could make components for the frame by laminating pieces of plywood, but that would be a real bother.

Your original post was asking for design help. I think you just got it from several posters who have made similar stands. Maybe time to heed their advice.

View FuNnY718's profile

FuNnY718

12 posts in 364 days


#13 posted 12-18-2016 11:01 PM



I admit, I had to Google live rock. I knew it was used in salt water aquaria, but didn t know the term.

As far as the “just plywood” build. I am not certain what you mean here. You will need a sturdy frame to support the weight. You could make components for the frame by laminating pieces of plywood, but that would be a real bother.

Your original post was asking for design help. I think you just got it from several posters who have made similar stands. Maybe time to heed their advice.

- Kazooman


what im trying to do is something like this this http://s938.photobucket.com/user/james1307oak/media/150%20Gal%20Oak%20Stand/photobucket-2047-1344183967108.jpg.html

i believe it was a lumberjocker poster by the name of dahenley.

this is the thred his post #11 http://lumberjocks.com/topics/57365

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plywoodman

12 posts in 380 days


#14 posted 12-18-2016 11:28 PM

Kazoo man is correct. If you’re building with plywood, you need something to secure the plywood to something besides itself. At the very least, you’ll need corner supports, top and bottom. Corner supports that run top TO bottom would be best. If you want the bottom of the aquarium to be hidden, cut or locate the corner supports shorter or lower ( respectively ) by the amount you want hidden. And, corner supports can be installed using pocket hole technology.

-- Don, Arizona. " How hard can it be "?

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

871 posts in 1792 days


#15 posted 12-19-2016 12:51 AM

The pictures you posted look like a pretty good framing design, but I would still be worried about the ability of the vertical support members to bear the load without bending. This is 500 pounds of water plus a lot of weight in “live rock” (I just learned that term, and I am proud to use it). Do not skimp on the verticals in the corners. If you choose to go without any vertical support in the center then you need an appropriate beam across the length of the stand to transfer the load to the end supports. There is no easier way around the problem. You have a lot of weight to support. If you are going to do it in wood then the pieces need to be sized to handle the load. You could go with a metal frame if making it “disappear” is an issue. Think carefully about it. Just how much sag do you need over the 48” length of the aquarium to open up a seam to create a leak? I would guess that the investment in the tank, peripherals, and the fish is huge compared to the minuscule cost for wood to make the base properly.

Please post a picture of your (hopefully) beefy tank support with several multicolored fish enjoying the environment.

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