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Decided to try segmented turning

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Forum topic by Eric S. posted 12-17-2016 07:06 PM 589 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


12-17-2016 07:06 PM

So I’ve been doing a lot of turning lately, and I’m getting a lot better. I also picked up a thin parting tool (which I love), and a carbide finisher, and while I’m not completely sold on carbide tools, I do like the finish I get with them. I tend to be a bit heavy handed sometimes, though, and carbide sometimes moves too fast for me. I’ll keep playing with and and see how I feel about it after more practice.

So since I’ve improved my skills a bit, I decided to try my hand at segmented turning. This piece is the result. It’s maple with a lacewood accent and bloodwood rim. What do you all think?

I’m kind of hooked on it, so I think I’m going to take some time this weekend to work on a wedgie sled and retire the chop saw for cutting segments. I did pick up a 12” disc sander yesterday, so between that and the drum sander, I think I’ll be able to get some smooth segments and rings now.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.


17 replies so far

View Bobby's profile

Bobby

108 posts in 2891 days


#1 posted 12-17-2016 09:28 PM

Wow!!! Looking great, Eric!!! I’m just waiting for the day where I’ll be good enough to turn something half
as good as what you’ve done here. Keep ‘em coming!!!

Bobby

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

533 posts in 2108 days


#2 posted 12-17-2016 09:44 PM

Well done! I like the wood colors. You will come to love the wedgie sled.

-- socrbent Ohio

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Lazyman

1508 posts in 1226 days


#3 posted 12-17-2016 10:42 PM

Nice! Not sure I ever seen anyone build a small segmented vessel. They always seem to be much bigger so I have never really considered it on my small lathe. I may have to try this. Is a drum sander a necessity?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


#4 posted 12-18-2016 05:37 AM


Well done! I like the wood colors. You will come to love the wedgie sled.

- socrbent

The build wasn’t bad. I have a metal miter slot guide that I’m going to attach, and I need to add the knobs and do some final trimming. I build a new zero clearance insert so that I can screw through it easily for the ramp. Tomorrow I should be able to finish it and build an adjustable stop.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View Eric S.'s profile

Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


#5 posted 12-18-2016 05:43 AM


Nice! Not sure I ever seen anyone build a small segmented vessel. They always seem to be much bigger so I have never really considered it on my small lathe. I may have to try this. Is a drum sander a necessity?

- Lazyman

I’m on a Rockler Excelsior Mini Lathe, so you can absolutely go small. The drum sander isn’t necessary, but it helps. If you have a large disc sander, that’ll work great too, otherwise just make sure you do your assembly on a flat surface and that you push all of the segments down all the way so that the layer is level. You can sand off fuzzies by hand, but you’ll need to take care to make sure that you get level layers without one of those types of sanders. I’m a little lazy with assemblies, so I rely on the drum sander and disc sander to give me a little wiggle room.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View Eric S.'s profile

Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


#6 posted 12-18-2016 05:47 AM


Wow!!! Looking great, Eric!!! I m just waiting for the day where I ll be good enough to turn something half
as good as what you ve done here. Keep em coming!!!

Bobby

- Bobby

Thanks! I haven’t been turning for very long, but I try to turn something almost daily, even if it’s something small. Every piece I turn makes me a little better. I’m still working on the inside of bowls. Most of my interiors are pretty ugly. I just bought a power sanding kit, so I’m hoping that it helps cover up my mistakes a bit, but I need to do better tool work on interiors, so… I guess I need to make more bowls and vases.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

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Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


#7 posted 12-18-2016 05:53 AM

Here’s a couple of shots of the construction if anyone is interested in seeing the before pics.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

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Lazyman

1508 posts in 1226 days


#8 posted 12-18-2016 02:57 PM

Thanks for the follow up. I have the same lathe as you. I don’t have a disc sander either so I suppose I might have to rig up a router planing jig or something. I could probably get one side flat on my belt sander but to get the other side parallel will take extra measures.

When it comes to getting the inside turned, have you considered turning each ring or two rings before gluing on the next one? The interiors of my bowls are always much uglier than the outsides too, especially near the bottom on my narrower, deeper ones, and being able to do that while the ring is at the top might make them look better. It just occurred me that another way to get each ring flat would be to do that on the lathe before gluing on the next ring.

When you turned it, how did you mount it on the lathe?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1569 days


#9 posted 12-18-2016 04:01 PM

Eric, you didn’t say if you glued all 8 rings at once, or glued them in segments of 4 pieces. Some segmenters do them in halves, wait for the glue to cure, sand the ends, then attach them to make the completed rings. .............Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


#10 posted 12-18-2016 04:04 PM



Eric, you didn t say if you glued all 8 rings at once, or glued them in segments of 4 pieces. Some segmenters do them in halves, wait for the glue to cure, sand the ends, then attach them to make the completed rings. .............Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs

All at once. I’m not patient enough for 2 glue ups.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View Eric S.'s profile

Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


#11 posted 12-18-2016 04:10 PM



Thanks for the follow up. I have the same lathe as you. I don t have a disc sander either so I suppose I might have to rig up a router planing jig or something. I could probably get one side flat on my belt sander but to get the other side parallel will take extra measures.

When it comes to getting the inside turned, have you considered turning each ring or two rings before gluing on the next one? The interiors of my bowls are always much uglier than the outsides too, especially near the bottom on my narrower, deeper ones, and being able to do that while the ring is at the top might make them look better. It just occurred me that another way to get each ring flat would be to do that on the lathe before gluing on the next ring.

When you turned it, how did you mount it on the lathe?

- Lazyman

Have to run out the door, but I’ll respond to this a bit later in detail.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

533 posts in 2108 days


#12 posted 12-18-2016 07:40 PM

A disk sander is a good way to flatten a ring. However if you don’t have one or a belt sander, then you can use a full sheet of sandpaper on a flat surface after using chisels or scrapers to remove squeeze out. You only have to do one side if you then glue the ring to the previous ring on the lathe using the tail stock and a board to put pressure on the glue up. To help with ring alignment and prevent the ring from slipping around as pressure is added I used double sided tape to affix the ring to be added onto a disk of mdf where the center was located and circles of various diameters have been drawn to help center the ring. The center of the disk is then used to locate the ring/disk combo the live center on the tailstock of the lathe. Glue is applied to the surface of the ring and pressed to the previous ring with the tailstock. Then you can use a scraper or sand paper on a piece of mdf after the glue sets to flatten the other side of the ring.


ring on disk


disk and ring being glued up

I have found that turning (at least until the surface is smooth) each ring as you add them both inside and out keeps the turning balanced, makes inside work much easier, and helps align the next ring.

-- socrbent Ohio

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Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


#13 posted 12-19-2016 02:37 AM

^ What he said ^

I personally like doing the glue-up all at once instead of ring by ring, but if I get to bigger pieces that vibrate too much, or if I try open segment work, I’ll probably try doing it one ring at a time.

As far as mounting it, I cut a round piece of scrap wood and glue it to the top of the bowl, which gets screwed into a faceplate. Once I do the roughing, I turn a tenon on the bottom of the bowl and mount it in a chuck and part off the scrap block, then turn the inside and finish the outside.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View Eric S.'s profile

Eric S.

40 posts in 460 days


#14 posted 12-19-2016 02:39 AM

My wedgie sled and stop are done. I just did some tests on it and it’s amazing. I’m really looking forward to using it.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1508 posts in 1226 days


#15 posted 12-19-2016 05:38 AM

Thanks for the tips.
I just watched a YouTube video by Marius Hornberger where he made a wedgie sled and a jig for creating a “wedgie” for accurately setting the angle. He’s a very clever and talented kid. Might be worth checking out.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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