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Forum topic by ravensrock posted 12-17-2016 05:15 PM 632 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ravensrock

465 posts in 1477 days


12-17-2016 05:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak walnut sanding

I made a walnut/white oak end grain cutting board. After putting a few coats of mineral oil on it over the last couple days I can see what appears to be some areas that are sanded differently. I think this is what happened. I sanded to 180 with the RO, sprayed some water on to raise the grain and then hand sanded with 220. I think what I’m seeing is some spots that weren’t hand sanded the same.

Can I use the random orbital to sand the top again with 220 even though it has oil on it to try to remove/even out the small scratches? Or must I wait days for it to dry more? It’s a Christmas present.

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking


10 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4802 posts in 3795 days


#1 posted 12-17-2016 05:32 PM

Why not try a gray non-woven pad to even out the surface? Use it with the oil.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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ravensrock

465 posts in 1477 days


#2 posted 12-17-2016 06:35 PM

I think it’s an uneven scratch pattern on those 2 spots. One of those pads wouldn’t even that would it? You are talking about the sanding pads?

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

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sras

4661 posts in 2964 days


#3 posted 12-17-2016 06:51 PM

Sand as you see fit – the oil won’t be an issue.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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ravensrock

465 posts in 1477 days


#4 posted 12-17-2016 07:20 PM

Thanks Steve. I think I’ll give it a try. My wife says she didn’t even see what I was talking about until I pointed it out. We woodworkers are such perfectionists!

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

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UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1698 days


#5 posted 12-17-2016 07:45 PM

I rely on my random orbital for all my cutting boards. I go to 220, raise the grain, then sand again at 220, then hand sand to 320. If you do this, they come out glass smooth.

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

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ravensrock

465 posts in 1477 days


#6 posted 12-17-2016 07:50 PM

Thanks Uncanny. It’s the fact that I already put oil on it that made me wonder if I could sand it again.

-- Dave, York, PA, Wildside Woodworking

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UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1698 days


#7 posted 12-18-2016 09:16 PM



Thanks Uncanny. It s the fact that I already put oil on it that made me wonder if I could sand it again.

- ravensrock

Nah, don’t worry about the oil. Just sand away! ;-)

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

View dalepage's profile

dalepage

314 posts in 675 days


#8 posted 12-20-2016 02:35 AM

I never raise the grain on end grain cutting boards. The end grain sands so smoothly that I don’t go past 120. I use Boos Oil and really soak it up. I’ve never had fuzzy grain from not raising it.

What happens with different species of wood is that one might shrink more than the other. You can feel the difference with your fingers. When that happens, I run 120 grit over it with my Festool Rotex 6-in orbital and it evens out in a matter of seconds.

I’ve only made one cutting board using oak. I liked the contrast it gives with maple, walnut, or cherry, but the end grain will really soak up liquids. Having reclaimed a very old genuine butcher’s block, I know you don’t want liquid in your board. I caution my buyers not to cut meat with it and not to submerse it. Use it for bread and veggies and wipe it with a damp cloth.

I wouldn’t use oak, but that’s my preference.

-- Dale

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UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1698 days


#9 posted 12-20-2016 02:38 AM



I never raise the grain on end grain cutting boards. The end grain sands so smoothly that I don’t go past 120. .
- dalepage

Dude…you are seriously missing out. It’s not hard to get them so smooth that they feel like marble.

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

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youdidntbuildthat72

18 posts in 356 days


#10 posted 01-10-2017 03:00 PM

i was at a woodworking symposium and there were all these so called smart, wise, professional woodworkers who were supposed to know there stuff. This guy handed around a few boards that were sanded and asked the pros in the audience what grit they thought the wood board that was handed around was sanded with>>>??? He did this with 3 different boards all labeled A B and C.
There were many guesses from the peanut gallery anywhere from 200 to 800 grit. He finally revealed after all the guesses that they were all 80 grit LOL
Perception is very personal and how you do it makes a difference. :)

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