LumberJocks

Hand Tool Woodworking Jigs & Fixtures

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by Ron Aylor posted 12-16-2016 05:28 PM 692 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


12-16-2016 05:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question jig fixture tradition woodworking hand tools traditional

 
As I have followed various threads on this site I have observed a renewed interest in traditional woodworking methods, as many of you are discovering the pleasure and advantages of using hand tools. Unfortunately, traditional woodworking is not as simple as flipping off the switch to that power tool and picking up the corresponding hand tool.

We often ignore the jigs and fixtures that traditional woodworkers use along with hand tools to improve speed, accuracy, and efficiency. Given that the majority of jigs and fixtures are user-made as perhaps occasion demands, they do not appear in standard tool catalogs, and as a result beginners experience unnecessary frustration with traditional hand-tool woodworking, and quickly return to their power tools.
 

 

Now, I realize that practice and experience will improve technique no matter how one works, with or without extra jigs and fixtures, but why attempt to do something unaided when the use of simple shop-built devices just might help towards achieving perfection.
 

 
So, what jig or fixture can you offer the newbie hand tool woodworker so that he or she can take command of those hand tools?
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.


12 replies so far

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#1 posted 12-16-2016 06:38 PM

 
Although nothing to look at, unless you like gnarly and overly distressed, my saw bench is the most used fixture in my shop. Constructed of the finest pallet lumber anyone could fine, this beast is perfect for ripping boards. All to often when ripping one must stop and slide the board forward to keep from tearing into the bench or saw-horse. This design allows for at least 30” of ripping before having to move the board. I my opinion, uninterrupted sawing is just as important as a sharp saw.
 

 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

16000 posts in 2254 days


#2 posted 12-16-2016 07:39 PM

The saw vise I have stays outside year-round.

Nothing fancy.

I tend to build jigs to hold parts so a plane can be used…

Usually just some scraps screwed to the bench. Finish a job, try to keep some of the pieces handy, in case another one needs a jig…

Other times, I’ll need something to hold a part upright, for chopping a through mortise or ten..

And, I can add a clamp to keep things from bouncing around..

Just a “base” and a pair of uprights, all screwed together. Can be adjusted to match the thickness of the part being held. I then add a few screws to hold the jig to the bench top. ( Hey, it IS a WORKbench, right, not a dining room table) About the best way I have when I need to chop these..

Lock rail connection for a screen door I built. Jig also works when the grooves needed ploughed…

That 1865 Plough plane has been retired, as I use a Stanley #45 now a days.

Oh, there was a jig to use in a dog hole..
I sized a 3/4” dowel to fit the dog holes, cut one end at an angle. Had a piece of old saw blade, screwed the plate to the angled end of the dowel. Saw teeth on the high side of the dowel. Push the jig into a doghole so that the low end is on the bench’s top. You now have a planing stop. I clamp a part between it and the end vise, and plane away the rough stuff. teeth will dig a bit into the endgrain, just like to old time stops used to do.

When I am able to hop down to the shop, and take a picture or three….I’ll try to get a few of the Plane Stop.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#3 posted 12-16-2016 08:02 PM

Here’s one of those “as perhaps occasion demands” jigs that became a rather versatile tool …

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#4 posted 12-16-2016 08:15 PM

Bandit … may I send you my address? I’ll take that 1865 Plough plane off your hands … LOL!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8520 posts in 2022 days


#5 posted 12-16-2016 08:22 PM

Ron, I built these several years ago. The first is a set of horses based on a Schwarz design.

They are really sturdy, that bench top is 4” thick 22” wide and 7 feet long and heavy!


In fact I made a set of risers and tested bench heights with them

They held up the bench for almost two years.

Next up is a planing jig for thin stock, the originals were made by Norm Pirolo.

it’s quite versatile

Also the ubiquitous chute board

And some birds mouth and pad pieces used with holdfasts

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#6 posted 12-16-2016 08:36 PM

Kevin – I tried the pad and bird’s mouth pieces, but just didn’t like it! I find it easier to push the work up against a dog at the head and place the holdfast at the rear with a little piece of scrap between it and the work. My little piece of scrap is 3/4” x 1-1/2” x 2-1/2” maple … has lived in my tool trough for 20 plus years. Sometime she doubles as a sanding block! I can’t tell you how many times I’ve dumped the trash bag looking for that little block of wood. Is that crazy or what?.

I may as well ask before Bandit does … why do you have holdfasts on your dining room table … LOL!
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8520 posts in 2022 days


#7 posted 12-16-2016 08:56 PM

They keep the table cloth in place, doesn’t everyone do this?

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#8 posted 12-16-2016 09:01 PM

; ) ...

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#9 posted 12-19-2016 12:25 PM

 
I guess this technically fits the bill for a jig and/or fixture … my sharpening station, consisting of diamond impregnated stones (course, medium, and fine), 1000 grit wet/dry sandpaper on glass, and a leather strop charged with chromium oxide. Just work your way across from left to right for a perfect edge every time!
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#10 posted 12-29-2016 12:21 PM

 
An improvement on the old V-clamp … one side of the notch is straight while and the other is angled to accept a
wedge. The workpiece receives greater support. This clamp is held in the vise by a keel. To help keep up with the wedge I added a pin so that it can be attached to the camp board. The wedge could also be attached with a length of cord.
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#11 posted 01-11-2017 05:54 PM

 
With just a few pieces of scrap, here’s a sweet little jig for burnishing card scrapers. I have a slot for a flat file used to joint the card. Once jointed, place a burnisher into one of three angled holes (15°, 30°, or 90°) to create a burr of your liking. Either clamp the jig to the bench and run the card bach and forth; OR, place your card in a vice and run the jig over the card.
 

 
                  
 

  
Enjoy!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

888 posts in 219 days


#12 posted 01-23-2017 12:01 PM

Here’s a great little jig for sharpening a drawknife …
 


 
Enjoy!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com