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What do you do after your last coat of finish (urethane/poly) is applied?

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Forum topic by gargey posted 12-14-2016 09:18 PM 2404 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gargey

862 posts in 611 days


12-14-2016 09:18 PM

For polyurethane, or urethane, or other finishes of that type (including GF Arm-R-Seal topcaots etc), what do you do after you apply the last topcoat?

Do you buff? Very very fine sand? Wax? Leave as is?

Also Arm-R-Seal says to not apply wax for 30 days (before its fully cured). People follow that in practice?

Just curious on best practices.

Thx


20 replies so far

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 405 days


#1 posted 12-14-2016 09:33 PM

OOOO steel wool with paste wax, buff, then just a coat of wax, buff.

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pintodeluxe

5461 posts in 2649 days


#2 posted 12-14-2016 10:00 PM

While steel wool and paste wax is the traditional method, I don’t do that anymore.
I have found that wet sanding with 1500 grit provides a nicer finish, and there’s no wax residue to contend with.

Just a spray bottle of tap water, and a soft sanding sponge is all you need.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4802 posts in 3796 days


#3 posted 12-14-2016 10:01 PM

mrbob has the plan. That’s what I do, though I don’t use polycrapithane on anything but table tops.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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bondogaposis

4477 posts in 2187 days


#4 posted 12-14-2016 10:15 PM

Rub it out with a brown paper sack and wax.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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gargey

862 posts in 611 days


#5 posted 12-14-2016 10:15 PM

What does this do, if I may ask? Even out and smooth the finish? Make it more glossy? Make it more satin-y?


While steel wool and paste wax is the traditional method, I don t do that anymore.
I have found that wet sanding with 1500 grit provides a nicer finish, and there s no wax residue to contend with.

Just a spray bottle of tap water, and a soft sanding sponge is all you need.

- pintodeluxe


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gargey

862 posts in 611 days


#6 posted 12-14-2016 10:16 PM

Same question here, how does this advance the finish? Also, are you then stuck in a cycle of having to reapply wax periodically? Thanks.


Rub it out with a brown paper sack and wax.

- bondogaposis

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mrbob

182 posts in 405 days


#7 posted 12-14-2016 10:25 PM



Same question here, how does this advance the finish? Also, are you then stuck in a cycle of having to reapply wax periodically? Thanks.

Rub it out with a brown paper sack and wax.

- bondogaposis
- gargey

Brown paper bags have a ruffness to them that will smooth the finish a bit.
If you wax once nothing sez you have to do it again, personal preference.

View jbay's profile

jbay

1856 posts in 735 days


#8 posted 12-14-2016 10:32 PM

I usually strip it and apply a few coats of lacquer…. :>/

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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MrUnix

5990 posts in 2035 days


#9 posted 12-14-2016 11:01 PM

Don’t do anything. After applying however many coats needed, I’ll let it cure overnight. Once fully dry, I’ll give it a very light once over with some 600 grit sandpaper,, wipe on a final coat of poly and call it done.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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gargey

862 posts in 611 days


#10 posted 12-14-2016 11:27 PM

Also unsure how much wipe on poly (actually urethane (Arm-R-Seal)) to apply. So thick that it appears glassy smooth, or wiped off so that you see the texture of the grain?

Tough to figure out without any teaching etc.

I have not dared to leave so much on that it appears glassy while wet.

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 405 days


#11 posted 12-14-2016 11:44 PM



Also unsure how much wipe on poly (actually urethane (Arm-R-Seal)) to apply. So thick that it appears glassy smooth, or wiped off so that you see the texture of the grain?

Tough to figure out without any teaching etc.

I have not dared to leave so much on that it appears glassy while wet.

- gargey


All depends on the look you want.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5461 posts in 2649 days


#12 posted 12-15-2016 12:02 AM

I grew up helping my dad finish wood projects, and he always left the final coat intact without any special treatments. The problem is you will always have some degree of dust knibs or overspray here and there.

The final rubbing out process makes a piece of furniture smooth to the touch, and welcoming to the hand.
Both the wax -n- wool and the wet sanding method work, but I’d rather not deal with the wax.

In response to gargey’s question if this makes it glossy? I usually spray lacquer in a semi-gloss or satin finish. Wet sanding the final coat doesn’t change the sheen much. It just softens the look a bit. Semi-gloss will look more like satin, and satin will look more like a low-luster hand-rubbed finish.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1423 posts in 1825 days


#13 posted 12-15-2016 01:18 AM

600 or 800 dry sand, very light just to smooth nibs or whatever. Then gray scotchbrite mounted on a drill sanding pad to even out the sheen. The depending on the desired end sheen, nothing, white scotchbrite, brown paper, again drill mounted. This is for tops only. Other surfaces get less of the same just to get a nice feel. Best to let cure 30 days. Never use wax. Use Meguiars auto cutting and polishing liquids if needed and finish with their sybthetic sealant – no buildup, streaks, or other problems caused with furniture wax. No concern with silicone – the finish is complete.

I I don’t use oil-based poly on furniture anymore for several reasons. Prefer to spray water-based poly for that. I do still use some on turnings

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bondogaposis

4477 posts in 2187 days


#14 posted 12-15-2016 02:44 AM

Rubbing w/ a brown paper sack removes any final dust nibs that might have settled in the finish and waxing adds a bit of protection to the finish. You can renew it periodically if you want to or not, it doesn’t lock you into anything.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

686 posts in 652 days


#15 posted 12-15-2016 04:45 AM

One thing a final coat of wax does is it leaves a silky smooth surface that is a pleasure to touch. If you do wax, you will need a rigorous maintenance schedule that follows. Once a year, get an old T shirt or other soft cotton fabric and wipe or buff the object to remove dust and finger prints.

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