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Forum topic by Bobby posted 12-14-2016 05:22 PM 789 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bobby

108 posts in 2892 days


12-14-2016 05:22 PM

Hi all…

I invested in a new carbide tool yesterday. It came with 3 different tips. I know the round one is for scraping for the most part. But I really don’t know what the “teardrop” and the square one are used for. Perhaps I can get a little help? Let’s remember that I am a complete newb at this woodturning thing. :-)

Thanks in advance,

Bobby


8 replies so far

View KYSean's profile

KYSean

119 posts in 3436 days


#1 posted 12-14-2016 05:34 PM

Tear Drop will get you in the bottom edges of a bowl or hollow form and square can be used for spindle roughing.

-- http://editedwrite.com

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

384 posts in 1302 days


#2 posted 12-14-2016 05:35 PM

Who makes the tool? Lots of carbide tools out there. A photo would help.

-- John

View jfoobar's profile

jfoobar

44 posts in 1171 days


#3 posted 12-14-2016 10:51 PM

At least among the larger vendors like Easy Wood Tools, the square one is for roughing (not just spindle roughing) and the round one is for rounded finishing cuts. The teardrop one I would have to see to comment on. However, all of them are made for scraping.

View Bobby's profile

Bobby

108 posts in 2892 days


#4 posted 12-15-2016 02:17 AM

Hi all…

Many thanks for the replies. So much appreciated!

The tool is made by “Hamlet”. It seems funny getting something that isn’t made in China.

I had to make a modification on it. The screw that came with it extruded about 1/8” on the bottom of the tool. This made it hit on the tool rest when working in close to the work piece. I just cut another bolt and ground it flush. Works like a charm now.

Here is a picture of the tool and it’s cutters and my modification: The grinder marks look worse in the photo because of the way the light is hitting it.

Bobby

View Bill7255's profile (online now)

Bill7255

417 posts in 2125 days


#5 posted 12-15-2016 12:57 PM

The tool should be resting on the flat behind the screw. You want the tool on the flat not up so close to the end. You have the tool rest too close if you are resting on the screw. I don’t think you hurt anything by grinding the screw, but that wasn’t necessary.

The tear drop is for hollowing.

-- Bill R

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1570 days


#6 posted 12-15-2016 03:21 PM

Bobby, the teardrop is used for a bunch of different radii plus it can go into a sharp corner. It just depends on how you position it on the tool for the results you’re trying to get. One thing you need to know is that the cutting surface should never be more than an 1/8” until you know what your abilities are. In other words, do not put the full edge of the teardrop into the wood. It will cause a lot of chatter and cause a catch.

What you do is position your tool about 15-20° at the surface if using the square. Start the cuts (scraping) on the point and do that until you’ve got it shaped and all hogged out. For S&G’s, put the full 1/2” of the cutter into a piece of wood you’re turning and listen to the sound change. That should help you determine how to present the tools in the future.

I believe Reed Grey/Gray, aka Robo Hippy, has a video on using carbide tools where he actually uses the edges at an angle instead of tool being flat on the tool rest. Keep in mind if you can find and watch this video, he is a professional turner. He’s had plenty of time to practice and knows what will work and what won’t work.

If anyone should disagree, please do as I would hate to think I’m giving bad advice. ......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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MrRon

4497 posts in 3083 days


#7 posted 12-15-2016 08:01 PM

Tools are usually designed with a single use in mind, but after a while, you find other ways to use the tool, none of which could be considered abuse. This doesn’t mean you should use a screw driver as a pry bar or to stir paint. I have personally seen someone stir paint with a screw driver after prying off the lid from the paint can.

View Bobby's profile

Bobby

108 posts in 2892 days


#8 posted 12-16-2016 10:08 PM

Thanks all for the great advice/lessons… I’ve just read them all over again for about the 3rd time and I’ll read them again before I start my next project. I’ve been getting the wood ready for said project this afternoon.

As I said, I’m recovering from major foot surgery. I went for my checkup this morning and was told that I will need a second surgery and, as a last resort, possibly a 3rd surgery. Not good news to start one’s day.

So I’ll be down in the shop as much as I can be from now until the surgery in March. I’m also hoping that I’ll be recovered enough for the start of golf season.

Bobby

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