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Router Biscuit Help Needed

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Forum topic by Mark1944 posted 12-13-2016 09:06 PM 477 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark1944

6 posts in 674 days


12-13-2016 09:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: biscuit joiner

I just bought a Stone Mt biscuit slot cutter kit and appears to a quality piece. However, it came with no instructions. I have a home-made router table, but the most complicated pieces I have done are some tongue & groove projects. Can anyone send or post some instructions for how to proceed? Here is the link to the set I bought on sale for $20 last week… http://www.ptreeusa.com/rtr_router_bit_stone_mountain_biscuit_cutter.htm

Thanks


9 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2328 days


#1 posted 12-13-2016 09:21 PM

I have a different set, but have only used mine in a hand held router. Not hard to do, make marks where you want to biscuits and gently plunge the router in centered on those marks. If doesn’t matter if the slot is a little long, but you do have to reference from the same face all the time so they are at the same height relative to the thickness of the wood. I still remember an episode of Norm simply making one long slot down the side of each workpiece, and then putting biscuits in every 12” or so.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Mark1944

6 posts in 674 days


#2 posted 12-13-2016 11:00 PM

Thx Fred… Your answer made a light go on. The kit includes 3 bearings… 7/8, 1 1/8 and 1 1/4. I couldn’t figure out how to use them. They, I assume are for hand held applications where you don’t have a fence to control the slot depth. Also, I can use them on my table with out the fence. I notice the carbide width is 0.157”, so I assume I need 1/8” thick biscuits. My knowledge of biscuits is watching Norm on “This Old House” 20 years ago.

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woodbutcherbynight

3641 posts in 2244 days


#3 posted 12-14-2016 02:59 AM

Take your time when making your slots. Check that the table is clear of debris. If something is under it or not lined up right the joint will not line up well. How do I know, ..... been there and done that. LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2328 days


#4 posted 12-14-2016 12:10 PM

Biscuits don’t come in thicknesses, the nominal thickness is 5/32”, and they have a slightly loose fit in the slot. They swell with the glue once the are inserted. The 3 bearings are for the common biscuit sizes you can buy: 0, 10, and 20.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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HokieKen

4510 posts in 973 days


#5 posted 12-14-2016 01:59 PM

Like Fred said^, biscuits are all the same thickness. I typically cull mine as well and toss any that have much slop. They swell with glue but you want them realatively snug to begin with. Their purpose is for alignment. If they’re sloppy, the alignment will be as well.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Mark1944

6 posts in 674 days


#6 posted 12-14-2016 06:08 PM

Thanks for the valuable information. I bought 100 Ryobi #20’s at Home Depot for 8 bucks. Measured a couple of dozen and they varied from 0.152” to 0.161”... most were around 0.157”. Also, thanks for the info on the bearings. Assuming the #20’s will require the small bearing. It surprises me that Stone Mountain, (which I believe is affiliated with Peachtree Woodworking), supplies no instructions/drawings with this very nicely packaged kit. My curiosity and my engineering background makes me enjoy reading manuals and instructions. It seems I always learn something when I scan the manual for a new tool. Or maybe, it’s something I already knew but my 73 year old brain forgot. Thanks again for everyone’s help.

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Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2328 days


#7 posted 12-14-2016 06:46 PM

Bear in mind, those can swell slightly is they just lay around. I keep mine with my reloading stuff (sealed storage with a desiccate) but at least put them in an airtight bag for storage. They can swell to where you can use them.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2328 days


#8 posted 12-14-2016 07:48 PM



Bear in mind, those can swell slightly if they just lay around. I keep mine with my reloading stuff (sealed storage with a desiccate) but at least put them in an airtight bag for storage. They can swell to where you can’t use them.

- Fred Hargis

To late to edit, let me correct my spelling errors. bold type above (stupid short edit window!)

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Mark1944

6 posts in 674 days


#9 posted 12-15-2016 04:09 PM

I thought about the humidity problem especially since my shop is my basement. The Ryobi come in an air tight plastic jar rather than a box.

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