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Forum topic by swirt posted 08-07-2010 09:20 PM 7158 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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swirt

2118 posts in 2439 days


08-07-2010 09:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question lathe

This is a simple question that I’m sure is going to make a lot of lathe owners laugh. I am building a really simple spring lathe but one of the first things that will get located is the tool rest and it won’t be movable. So I need to know, what is the height of the tool rest supposed to be, relative to the axis of rotation?

I read one place where it should be 1/8” above and another said right even with the axis. I am planning to use this primarily for turning tool handles (like for chisels) if the application plays a role in the height.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com


10 replies so far

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2541 days


#1 posted 08-07-2010 09:33 PM

The answer depends on the cutting tool you are using. For a scraper you should be just a little higher than the axis and use the tool in a pointing down configuration. Most gouges should be just below the axis. Skews are usually used with the tool rest above the axis.

If I had to settle on a single height, I would probably go just a little lower than the axis (maybe 1/8th of an inch).

My favorite cutter is the easy rougher and for that tool you should to be below the axis by an amount equal to the thickness of the shaft so the cutter is perfectly horizontal to the axis.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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swirt

2118 posts in 2439 days


#2 posted 08-07-2010 10:27 PM

Thanks Rich, Youve now jumped me ahead to my next question. If I were to buy just one cutter for creating simple tool handles, what should it be? I’m not looking to create fancy. Just round with some gentle tapers.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2541 days


#3 posted 08-07-2010 11:51 PM

I really like my easy rougher. it’s so easy to use. I almost feel like I am cheating. Check out the video here – -

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/store/Turning_Tools___Special_Purpose_Tools___Easy_Rougher___easy_rougher_ci1?Args=#video

The video shows turning a bowl. The product works equally well on spindle turning. The name implies that it is just for rough work. Not true. I use it as a scraper and peal off those super thin pieces that just float away.

This has a carbide tip cutter that you never have to sharpen. After about 20 hours you need to turn the cutter to a new edge. Eventually you need to replace the cutter.

If I could only have one cutting tool – this would be it.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3685 days


#4 posted 08-08-2010 04:08 AM

Boy, is Rich ever right. It really does feel like cheating when you use the easy rougher. I also have the easy finisher, which is basically the same tool but with a round cutter. There is practically nothing you can’t do with these two tools.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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swirt

2118 posts in 2439 days


#5 posted 08-08-2010 04:29 AM

Thanks for the suggestions Rich and Charlie. That looks pretty cool…right up until I got to the price tag. I don’t mind splurging for a tool I’d use regularly, but this is something I’d use only once in a while… like when I find a nice chisel for a few bucks at a garage sale and want to put a new handle on it. (Maybe once or twice a year and probably no more than 30 times ever.)

Maybe someday I’d really take a liking to turning and get more into it, but at the moment my interest is pretty simple and utilitarian. If I wasn’t using a $125 Easy Rougher, what would be the less expensive runner up for turning a few tool handles on a super simple spring pole lathe? Is a simple roughing gouge not enough for the job at hand?

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3685 days


#6 posted 08-08-2010 05:09 AM

You can certainly turn a square piece of wood into a round piece of wood with an inexpensive roughing gouge. The cut is going to be rough, though, and you are going to spend a lot of time sanding to get something you’d want to use as a tool handle.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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swirt

2118 posts in 2439 days


#7 posted 08-08-2010 05:49 AM

Most of my wood comes generally roundish from the shaving horse, is there another gouge style that would be better than the roughing gouge for my purposes? (other than that cool pricey carbide one)

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View interpim's profile

interpim

1158 posts in 2925 days


#8 posted 08-08-2010 06:24 AM

I would check out some of the Benjamin Best spindle gouges… I think that is going to be your most cost effective tool for turning handles…

http://www.pennstateind.com/store/LX340.html

-- San Diego, CA

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swirt

2118 posts in 2439 days


#9 posted 08-09-2010 05:16 AM

Thanks for the recommendation interpim. The price seems right if it can do the job at hand.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Roper's profile

Roper

1370 posts in 3180 days


#10 posted 08-09-2010 05:53 AM

you can always use a skew gouge , just takes a little practice.

-- Roper - Master of sawdust- www.roperwoodturning.com

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