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My homemade dowel maker jig, (Corrected version)

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Forum topic by Dick, & Barb Cain posted 03-10-2007 11:08 PM 58523 views 13 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3047 days


03-10-2007 11:08 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dowel making jig router jig jig images jig dick tip

I promised quite awhile ago that I’d show some images of my dowel making jig. I got the plan from a book , but I don’t remember the name of the book. It’s real easy to make, & you can get the material right out of your scrap pile.
For 1/2” dowels you use 9/16” square stock. You chuck it in your hand drill, & spin it as you feed it in. You can round the end of the square stock in order to fit your chuck, put a large screw, or hanger bolt in the end. You can make this jig longer, & put a series of dowel sizes.
You use a 1/2,” or larger core bit in your router.

Clamp the jig in a vise. then clamp your router to the jig.

Here’s the Windsor Chair
Click for details

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1


36 replies so far

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Don

2603 posts in 2925 days


#1 posted 03-11-2007 03:40 AM

Interesting idea.

Let’s see if I’ve got this right.

1. You chuck the square dowel stock in your hand drill.
2. You place a ‘core bit in your router.
3. With both the router and the hand drill turned on, you feed the square stock into the jig.
5. The router bit turns the square stock into a round dowel.

Am I close?

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

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Obi

2213 posts in 2985 days


#2 posted 03-11-2007 03:56 AM

Yup, he’s a lumberjock

And I thought I was an extremist when I was using sandpaper and a drill

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Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3047 days


#3 posted 03-11-2007 06:08 AM

Right on the money Don,
It’s not very fancy, but it did the job. I was more interested in getting my Windsor chair done, so I slapped it together in a hurry.
It takes a little adjusting of the cutter depth to get the perfect dowel diameter, but once it’s adjusted it stays adjusted, until the next time you setup.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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Obi

2213 posts in 2985 days


#4 posted 03-11-2007 07:38 AM

And whatta ya mean not fancy? It’s more than fancy, it’s elaborate.
Might not be real pretty, but it’s definately fancy.

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Don

2603 posts in 2925 days


#5 posted 03-11-2007 08:54 AM

Here’s a similar jig.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

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David

1970 posts in 2887 days


#6 posted 03-11-2007 09:39 AM

Dick – nice dowel jig! I copied this and Don’s pdf to my woodworking files for future reference. You never know when you will need a custom dowel from the stock you are working with instead of a store bought dowel that doesn’t match.

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

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Obi

2213 posts in 2985 days


#7 posted 03-11-2007 09:52 AM

And i can’t sleep. I’ve got dowels on the brain. I got the new dowel maker that I ordered from Veritas. It arrived today and I made several dowels. But now I’m not satisfied with making just one size dowel. And the one that Karson bought for $300… I’m thinking that $300 would go a lot farther with another purchase. So I’m thinking somewhere between Dick and Don there is a happy medium.

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David

1970 posts in 2887 days


#8 posted 03-11-2007 09:54 AM

Obi – you are getting too fancy!

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

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Obi

2213 posts in 2985 days


#9 posted 03-11-2007 09:58 AM

it must be my new picture, David.

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Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3047 days


#10 posted 03-11-2007 05:56 PM

Don
I like that Highland setup.
I might make one with the following modifications. I’d have it clamped to the router fence making it a simpler changeover. I’d also use a large 45 degree bit, so you can use the up, down adjustments of the router for fine tuning the dowel size.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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Obi

2213 posts in 2985 days


#11 posted 03-11-2007 05:59 PM

and why cant you clamp the jig to the fence? Or is it already?

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Bill

2579 posts in 2909 days


#12 posted 03-11-2007 06:02 PM

A great jig Don. Maybe your next step is to make the center changeable so you can do other size dowels too. While Os could have made them on his lathe, I know it would take me forever, and not likely they would all match.

Yes Obi, maybe it is your new picture. Is that what they call fade to black (and white)? Or LIB (lumberjocks in black). hahaha

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

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Obi

2213 posts in 2985 days


#13 posted 03-11-2007 06:05 PM

Im trying to make this my little logo thing in my address bar, but it isnt working so far

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Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3047 days


#14 posted 03-11-2007 06:08 PM

Obi
The one Don shows, that it’s screwed to the router base.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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oscorner

4564 posts in 3059 days


#15 posted 03-11-2007 08:01 PM

Bill, I’m sure it wouldn’t take any longer on the lathe than it must take to set up the router and the drill. Personally, I don’t care to have a bit turning at 20,000 rpms while spinning a piece of stock with a drill, when I can have the piece secured in between centers with a roughing gouge firmly resting on my tool guide. But, as everyone knows by now, that’s just me talking. In reality, you are doing the same functions: spinning a wooden blank and using a cutting edge to shave off the high spots. A steady rest on the lathe will make turning such thin material an easier task. With it you wouldn’t have to use your fingers to support the center of the dowel to keep it from chattering.

The great thing about all these different methods is that no matter what your comfort level or what tools you posses, these show that with a little thought and imagination it can be done. I love the sharing of ideas.

-- Jesus is Lord!

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