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Over the blade dust collection

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Forum topic by deadherring posted 12-12-2016 01:41 AM 3060 views 2 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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deadherring

59 posts in 1479 days


12-12-2016 01:41 AM

Hi,

I’ve decided I’m finally sick of getting blasted in the face with sawdust when cutting on the table saw and am determined to figure out the best option for over the blade dust collection.

I’ve got the Grizzly G0690 table saw and have a 2HP Grizzly dust collector piped into the shop and connected to the table saw dust collector port. The problem is the dust coming off the blade that hits me in the face. Even with eye and mouth/nose protection it’s a lot of dust and it gets all over the shop.

I came across this home made option in which he connects a 2.5” pvc pipe to the riving knife on his saw, but it limits cut height, prevents the blade from being fully lowered and the possibility of the wingnut ending up in the blade doesn’t make me too thrilled.

Grizzly sells an over the blade system which might be a possibility. It’s pretty pricey vs. a home made system, but any home system that uses a shop vac I’ll have to buy a new one and a chip seperator to go with it so it will come out to roughly the same. I’m wondering with the Grizzly system how I would use a push block since it seems to cover the blade?

Any thoughts on over the blade dust collection is appreciated, preferably something not too complicated. If links to a build video of plans were available it would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Nathan


26 replies so far

View rolandk's profile

rolandk

16 posts in 366 days


#1 posted 12-12-2016 02:47 AM

try watching Dan Pattisons channel on you tube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFyGhu43tUU. I like his aver arm system but not his guard. there is a shop notes blade guard that sandwiches a standard shop vac attachment with plexiglass that looks a lot better. hope this helps and the link works. 1st time posting.

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MrUnix

5990 posts in 2034 days


#2 posted 12-12-2016 03:02 AM

AFAIK, all over-arm guards do, or can, provide dust collection… Excalibur, Biesemeyer, Grizzly, Sawstop, Penn State, etc… If you have some metalworking skills and access to a welder, making one would be another option. But it would have to be pretty well built, as otherwise it might not be safe enough and could present a real danger should something go wrong with it. I would look to one of the commercially available ones for design guidance.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2329 days


#3 posted 12-12-2016 12:09 PM

Also consider the Shark Gaurd, I had one for years on my Unisaw and it really worked well. It’s also a little less expensive than most of the others.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 1946 days


#4 posted 12-12-2016 01:24 PM

15+ years with the Excalibur on two saws with zero regrets for me. Expensive, and guards are never an exciting or sexy purchase, but the value is there.

I don’t like guards that attach to a splitter or riving knife because they don’t work with most sleds and jigs, or with dado and most rabbeting operations.

I use sleds and jigs pretty much any time I’m not straight line ripping, so such a guard would seriously destroy the utility of my table saw. I use several crosscut and dado sleds, taper sleds, edge straightening sleds, box miter and spline sleds, a dovetail sled, a tenon jig, an L-fence, and sub fences that bury part of a dado set under the fence. In time, you probably will too…

The beauty of the Excalibur is that when needed, it can lock in a raised position to clear sled rails or a zero clearance miter fence, swing out of the way, or completely come off the saw in seconds, all without tools. The easier a guard can come and go, the more chance it will be on the saw as much as possible… When raised, it still collects a decent amount of dust, while a splitter mounted guard sits on the shelf doing nothing.

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mike02130

167 posts in 508 days


#5 posted 12-12-2016 03:22 PM

Hmm, forty years useing a table saw and I never got blasted in the face. Is that common with the imports?

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2329 days


#6 posted 12-12-2016 04:25 PM

Don’t know, but my USA Unisaw threw an awful lot of dust off the blade. I’m not sure it hit me in the face, tho’.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2422 posts in 2761 days


#7 posted 12-12-2016 04:35 PM

I haven’t had much excess sawdust from my Unisaw – a few years ago I bought, installed, and then returned the Excalibur system, just couldn’t get used to the big thing over top my saw. Over 30 years without it might have made me feel that way.

I spent some additional time sealing most holes in the Unisaw cabinet and with a zero clearance throat plate and my dust collection system, the dust on top of the table is minimal.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

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jkinoh

92 posts in 1733 days


#8 posted 12-12-2016 05:30 PM

As Mr. Unix said, if you have access to a welder, you could make one. I made the arm first, since it was in the dust collection pipe support, then made the part over the saw blade later on. I initially made it out of wood, as a “prototype”, to see if it would work. It has, and as a lot of my prototypes go, is still being used. I think I made this 6 or 7 years ago. Maybe more. Anyway, it works fine. Sucks up all the dust and keeps my digits away from sharp stuff. Sorry for the poor pictures, but shop is in middle of actual work.

-- Why buy it for $300 when you can make it for $500!!

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1138 posts in 1059 days


#9 posted 12-12-2016 06:02 PM

I started with one that I made myself but ended up getting a shark guard. The benefit is that I could order it with whatever size dust port I wanted but still maintain a narrow blade guard. I needed 4” for my dust collector so the guard I made my own had to be a little over that in width to accommodate the flange.

The Shark Guard has the 4” but it still narrows down to have the guard only be a couple inches wide.

I also like that it has a roller at the very front so it can easily raise and ride over the lumber as it goes through.

View jkinoh's profile

jkinoh

92 posts in 1733 days


#10 posted 12-12-2016 09:33 PM

I like the narrow design of the Shark Guard. Maybe my next “prototype” will be more like that!! It’s hard to change when something works.

How easy is it to remove the Shark Guard? I loosen one knob and mine swings up and out of the way.

-- Why buy it for $300 when you can make it for $500!!

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2901 posts in 2092 days


#11 posted 12-12-2016 10:41 PM

Nathan, +1 for the SharkGuard, but be aware that the lead time is something like 2-3 months IIRC.

-- Art

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BG43017

13 posts in 2524 days


#12 posted 12-13-2016 01:47 AM

Jkinoh,

JK, was wondering if you could post the overall dimensions of your blade cover, some close up photos of the cover itself and perhaps a video of it in operation ripping and cross cutting? What is the purpose of the T-track? Also perhaps a photo of how it swings out the way when not in use.

—Bob

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1721 posts in 1865 days


#13 posted 12-13-2016 04:01 AM

I just went Shark Guard. Bought the 4” PM66 version this Monday evening. I think a purchase well spent. I’m good at making my own stuff. But for the price of a Shark Guard, it’s a no brainer.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2329 days


#14 posted 12-13-2016 12:13 PM



I like the narrow design of the Shark Guard. Maybe my next “prototype” will be more like that!! It s hard to change when something works.

How easy is it to remove the Shark Guard? I loosen one knob and mine swings up and out of the way.

- jkinoh

The Shark I had on my Unisaw was fastened with the clamp from a Bies snap in splitter, and may be different from the stock setup. Still, mine was a 3 second operation to remove. (Maybe 5 seconds)

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View deadherring's profile

deadherring

59 posts in 1479 days


#15 posted 12-13-2016 03:46 PM

Hi all,

Thanks for all the replies. I don’t have the ability to weld and am leaning towards a bought vs build solution.

For those that have an over the saw solution, I’m wondering a few things:

1. Did it solve the dust coming off the blade problem?
2. I noticed many of the solutions cover the blade (naturally). Does this present a problem when it comes to using push sticks? I use them quite a lot—as a relative beginner they are safer for me—does the solution preclude the ability to use them? I use the style that covers the stock (the Jay Bates model for those that are familiar) as opposed to the smaller ones you use to push through.

Thanks,

Nathan

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

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