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Jet OS16 Planer - Separating Head Assembly from Base Assembly

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Forum topic by MerylL posted 12-11-2016 04:48 AM 555 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


12-11-2016 04:48 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jet planer os16 disassembly head assembly base assembly

Hi – I’m at the end of my rope on this. I bought a used Jet OS16 planer. Nice machine, low use, BADLY used. All the rollers, fingers, blades, cutter head, etc. are really gummed up. They were trying to repurpose pallets. (Guess what the knives look like!)

So I’ve got the manual, watched a really awesome “delta” disassembly video (9 parts, great vid) etc. But that is a little benchtop, and much of it does not translate to this 400-lb+ beast. I also watched Pop Woodworking on changing to a helix head. So at least now I have an idea of how to get the cutter head out.

But I still need to get that head assembly OFF, upside down, and start removing and refurbishing the rollers, feeders, etc. I cannot figure out the “key item” that lets me lift that head assembly off the base assembly.

Anyone got any pointers? Anyone done this? Here’s what I see from the diagrams:

There is an internal nut at the top of the lead screws/inside the column. It is too small to be a player.

The lead screws and their bottomside gears, etc. and the nut holding it all on at the bottom are visible, and understandable. But that is not enough to be holding that head down while it is beating on a board.

I would expect to see some through-bolts holding the 2 assemblies together. I do not. Help, anyone?

The PO used to spray it down with WD-40 all the time as a rust preventative. I guess it “sort of” worked in that the rust isn’t peeling off. ha ha but what it DID do was make a gray/black film over it all that has hardened into a second skin. I’ve been trying many things on it.

The pallets have really gummed it up, and that gum is rock-hard now. The rollers have layers of dry, hard stuff on them as deep as 1/32 in places. I have no choice but to get this disassembled one way or another. I would HATE to have to call a friend over to help me load it and drive to an “authorized” center and pay half the price of a new one. Ouch.


19 replies so far

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1862 days


#1 posted 12-11-2016 05:28 AM

http://lumberjocks.com/Holbs/blog/51466

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


#2 posted 12-11-2016 05:55 AM

Holbs!!! Day 2! That’s what I need! But no details in there at all. That is exactly where I am stuck. How did you get there? Please pray tell! Would PM work better?

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1862 days


#3 posted 12-11-2016 05:59 AM

As you can see from my blog, I’ve done what your trying to do. I had the same issue about removing the head after getting all the parts off ready for removal. I do not recall exactly what pieces need to be removed but I did have to find the PDF plans from eReplacements or maybe it was from Jet parts & diagrams, then backward engineered.
From what I remember, 3 of the 4 posts have nothing uptop of the threaded rod. The one does the wheel mechanism of course. Underneath the columns, there is a nut, the sprocket, a snap ring, and then a bearing. Can’t forget the 2 per column bolt screw thingies that hold the table to the piece that rides up and down the column threaded rod.
My planer was super rusty. Even after having things ready to physically remove the head off the 4 columns, I had to gently use my hydraulic car jack 1/16” each column at a time to get the head assembly off.
I’d like to keep things public instead of PM in case someone else one day has to do what we both went through :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


#4 posted 12-11-2016 06:22 AM

Absolutely to non-PM. I agree, but wanted to make it as painless as possible for you, since I’m the one asking the favors. :-)

So… I know the parts you are referring to. That seemed like “the wrong rabbit hole” for getting the 2 segments to separate. However, given this encouragement, I will go down tomorrow a.m. and see if I can make that happen.

I read your entire blog. HUGE Kudos to you. Mine is nowhere nearly as bad off as yours was. Sheesh… I would have walked away from it… I’m just not that confident. Although if I get through this one, i’m guessing that will change. I’m also going to be investing in some rust-away stuff and/or electrolysis. My rust is pretty minor, really. Most of it should come off with fine-grit wet/dry and scratch pads with some thinner. FWIW, I’ve also had good experience on table-tops using a carborendum (sp?) whetstone, coarse then smooth, finaled with 0000 steel wool.

Well, tomorrow is another day, and hopefully I’ll have good news. I am thoroughly encouraged and optimistic after seeing your Jet’s transformation! Thank you for the inspiration!

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1862 days


#5 posted 12-11-2016 06:26 AM

good luck and post something if you have a question. BTW, I could be totally wrong about there not being something uptop of the threaded rod in the column. Maybe there was an additional bearing uptop or more allen head screw thingies up top and bottom of column. Backward engineer the PDF parts diagram.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


#6 posted 12-12-2016 04:15 AM

Well, You were leading me down the right path. The reverse-engineering I was doing was at odds with what I was seeing. Turned out I was seeing broken nut assembly inside the columns… the nuts that anchor the head assembly to the lead screws! I could see 3 of the 4 (the 4th was the wheel screw so hidden), and they all “jiggled” when I poked them, leading me to believe that they were too flimsy to be what I was looking for. Yep… ‘cause they was busted. So for future explorers, this is what I’ve done last night and today:

1. Remove hoods, shrouds, etc.
2. Remove the motor. Only has 3 bolts.
3. Remove the retaining bolt for the pulley and pry the pulley off with a small wrecking bar.
4. Remove the gearbox cover. It has one center bolt, but 1 back-plate has to be removed (loosen the other, but leave it on). I did the left.
5. Remove the spring for the tensioner (bottom is easiest) and flip the tensioner out of the way.
6. Remove the retaining bolts from the 3 gears.
7. Thread zip ties through the chains to lock the gears together in synch
8. Mark the key channels positions against the housing (I tried to align them all to the top, but they were all different orientations.)
9. Pull the gears off as a unit.
10. Remove the blades if they need sharpening.
11. Lay two 2×4s on the bed, on edge, and lower the head assembly to them using the wheel.
12. Remove the 4 Allen bolts on the top of the casting, holding the gearbox in place.
13. Slightly raise the head assembly using the wheel. This SHOULD allow the gearbox to drop down on the 2×4s. If not, using a small 2×2 block to tap it where it abuts the top casting.
14. Attempt to wiggle the entire cutter head out of the race on the other end. If it sticks, give it gentle whacks with a dead-blow, or a large hammer, with a chunk of wood. (NOT on the bolt… take that out and leave it with the pulley!)
15. Pull the cutter head out completely and place on a bench. You will need to drain the oil later.
16. What I did not do, and should have done at this point, was to raise the table to its top limits and blocked it with 2×4s. Now I have to get someone to help me lift it up over all the rusted columns. Ugh.
17. To disengage the head assembly, it is necessary to remove the sprockets and chain under the base. Number all sprockets against the frame. You WILL need to loosen the base assembly from the base itself, although do keep the nuts on to safeguard against dropping it off the base completely. That would be the end of the project! I stood on the feet and used the lift handles to jiggle the entire assembly to shake the sprockets off. (I didn’t know I was that strong!)
18. Remove the retaining clips (internal) from the bottom of each of the lead screws now that you have gotten the sprockets off and can see them.
19. Then remove the 2 Allen-bolts at the top of the casting in the columns. (The lower ones are best left in for now.)
20. Using a hammer and a chunk of wood (flimsy is good, so you don’t whack it too badly), gently drive the lead screw down until it pops out of the bearing channel at the bottom.
21. Reach up from the bottom and unthread the lead screw from the nut assembly that you just released earlier (those 2 Allen bolts at the top of the columns).
22. Work out the nut assembly through the gap in the column, and drop the lead screw out through the bottom. That will now allow the head assembly to move freely (over the rust) up the columns!

A friend is coming over after work to help me lift it off. I think it might be time for me to invest in a come-along and a big soft rope. Although he’s a rigger, so making sure he shows me the best way would be good, too.

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1862 days


#7 posted 12-12-2016 04:19 AM

when you re-assemble the sprocket and chain, let me know how well you did. I have to use 2 hands to turn my wheel. I think I didn’t “time” the chain very well or something. Or maybe you have to use 2 hands.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


#8 posted 12-12-2016 04:26 AM

Aye. Will do. That handle just SPUN once I had that chain off! Wow! Wish the entire table would move like that.

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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


#9 posted 12-13-2016 02:17 AM

Some success tonight! Tonight was about removing the head assembly. Cutterhead was out, lead screws, etc. as indicated in the earlier post. Fortunately, when I told my most-burly friend that I needed brawn, I included “or a come-along.” He brought both. And we needed it. Those columns and their rides/slides were very, very gummy indeed. So much so that we could lift the weight of the base assembly and base as well just by lifting the head assemblyl. Tap with hardwood to drive the base down, hoist, tap, hoist tap, until we were stuck. Then I thought to measure all 4 posts (Doh!) and found I was a bit cocked. So we worked it back down to get it fairly level We weren’t more than 3/8 out but with those tolerances, it was plenty to bind it.

Then we took our time, measuring, tapping, hoisting in cycles until we were making barely perceptible progress. Needless to say, I was Nervous Nellie, thinking I might be breaking something. Finally he said, “Give me that hammer and that piece of wood.” He SMACKED that thing. Wow. It jumped to life, and in a few minutes, one side had cleared. A few more “crashing blows from a huge right hand” and that “Louisiana fellow” had come loose. Nothing major, although you can see one of the columns had a big rusty gouge in it. Probably when they broke the internal “nut assembly” bits for the lead screws.

So now it is off to the hardware store for a few rolls of emery and varsol. Yahoo. At least it is apart. I’ll remove the columns from the base and make them pretty as well. I can’t believe how far I’m having to tear this apart. If you had told me I would be doing this a month ago, I would have been quaking and denying any ability to do so. Oh well… such is life.

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1862 days


#10 posted 12-13-2016 03:15 AM

pictures please :)
do not worry. re-installing the head after everything is cleaned up will be smooth sailing. I greased everything upon reassembly. Could install the head and remove it by easily sliding.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


#11 posted 12-21-2016 04:35 AM

PREVIEW mode is showing the RH side of the images clipped off. But if you click on them and hold the click, you can see the larger picture.

Some things have to be done before you can get back to work on your primary goal:
  • I bolted my vise to my workbench
  • I bolted my grinder to the workbench, and put a wire-wheel on it
  • I hung another light over the bench
  • I put a wire wheel on the grinder
Then I could get back to the real task at hand.
  • I removed the columns (just 2 set screws) and wire-wheeled them into a clean state. Some pitting remains.
  • I attempted to remove the table rollers. I was not able to – I think they are “pressed in” rather than “mechanically retained.” I couldn’t figure it out, and was afraid to get myself into a pickle that I needed professional help with.

  • So I cleaned them in-place instead. They had a very thick (1/32”) layer of pallet goo on them in areas. It looked like a white gluey substance. I finally discovered that if I squirted some oil on it (I used SAE 30), that worked better than the acetone I tried. (Acetone = Paint GONE!) And not as dangerous. But it did take nearly an hour on each one. I scraped them, used “fine” emory, then 400-g wet/dry paper. In the process I became very familiar with them, so now I know how to adjust them.
  • I thoroughly cleaned the base assembly (including column mount areas), and the stand. The POs sprayed WD-40 on everything, so it leaves a pretty odd grey splatter on everything that does not come off completely. I used some acetone on the worst areas, which takes the paint along with it, so there is a delicate trade-off on that.
  • Then I tackled the table. I used the coarse side of a whet-stone with mineral spirits, then the fine side, then a green scratchpad on the bottom of the whetstone. Cleaned up very nicely, although some pitting remains. Oh well, more space for the wax to hold on! I waxed it all including the paint.
  • Tomorrow I will remove the infeed and outfeed rollers and hopefully the kick-back fingers. They are all badly gummed up from the pallets. Tonight, though, I need to get the nut-assemblies ordered for the 3 columns where they are broken in 2 (3 of the 4 columns). And a 4-inch port. I do not want to blow sawdust all over my basement!

Another day’s work:

  • Well, surprises! I was able to remove the rollers, clean everything up, free up the sticky kick-back fingers (lots of back-n-forth action along with some 3-in-1 oil). Cleaned everything, even the cutter-head, beast that it is. I even wire-wheeled the blades. They are beaten all the way through the secondary bevel.

Another tomorrow came and went:
  • Last night I went to sleep dreaming about being able to start putting it back together. Silly me! First, I decided it was time to drain the gearbox. Oh My Gosh. Black with lots of silver in it. NOT a good sign.
  • So I tore it open. It was thick with sludge. Thick-thick, with ¼ to 3/8 of an inch of solid sludge on the bottom. Further inspection showed that the input gear from the cutter-head itself and the gear it meshes with were really badly worn. As in, half the thickness of each tooth as missing in the track where they run, almost. All that beating they did that broke the lead-screw nuts must hav also been transferred to the cutter-head. The bearings on those two were shot as well. So I buttoned it all back up, took it and the knives and the oil to a local repair shop (Barbo) here in town.
  • They said now it is no sooner that mid-January, that I will (if all goes well) have my parts back in hand. BUT they said that those blades can be salvaged. Once they do that, I’ll use care with them, and use the Deulen jig for sharpening them next time. But this is going to add some serious $ to it… my poor credit card is going to feel this. Ah well… I don’t do Christmas, and all those other expenses. They’re also going to order those 4 nuts for the lead screws, the dust port, and the spanner wrench for my shaper, so I canceled with MM.
  • I did come home and put the head assembly back on, blocked with wood chocks until I can get the nuts to replace the broken ones. Holbs was right: It is a lot easier to put the head back on than it was taking it off.

As dirt cheap as I got all this equipment, and the planer being the last of them, I guess I shouldn’t complain. It was the only tool that they said the really used of the five. I wonder if they had any idea how badly they toasted that gearbox? That thing HAD to be protesting!

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1862 days


#12 posted 12-21-2016 04:40 AM

what would the price tag for each of those gears via eReplacements.com or directly from Jet? And changing out bearings is not too shabby. Granted, I have lots of experience changing things out to new bearings :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


#13 posted 12-21-2016 05:02 AM

Honestly, I didn’t look. I “cut and ran.” In the 7 1/2 years I’ve been working on this house, I have:
  • Learned to run wiring – I’ve run 1500 fee of 12/2, about 75 boxes, signed off by city.
  • Learned how to do lath & plaster – closed all the walls and ceilings when I was done with the wiring (where my lovely plumber did the new water and waste first!)
  • Learned how to strip floors. Did my last two solo.. 1250 feet. Brutal job… I’m not really built for that.
  • Learned how to remove, repair, restore, reinstall old windows – 22 of 40 done, 18 to go, the way the old-timers did it
  • Learned all these with old tools the old way.

And I looked inside that gearbox and my blood ran cold. lol – I decided with my few days of vacation that I would focus on wiring my basement for these tools and pay for the gearbox. I AM a bit worried about it, but as only a woman knows, if you save here, you get to spend it there. :-) I’ve saved thousands doing my own electrical and plastering and windows… about $50-$60K so far. So this will be my Christmas treat. Ha… I don’t actually DO Christmas, but shhhh!

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1862 days


#14 posted 12-21-2016 05:05 AM

naw…it’s easy since you had the head off already, I think.
But every obstacle snags up more time away from something else so I understand. At the end of re-installing my Jet planer, I was really ready to move onto something else.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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MerylL

70 posts in 1204 days


#15 posted 12-21-2016 05:18 AM

Aye – for sure. I’m actually laser-focused on getting this shop going, but for reasons related to my primary goal: Finish restoring my old house. Once this is done, I will have to make some of the windows over… the rest are badly deteriorated, as in falling apart at the seams. All the built-in drawers need their sides repaired, hence the tablesaw. I’ve figured out a way to repair them by sawing knocking them apart, sawing off the bottoms, cutting new bottoms and dado them out for the bottoms. Sometimes, I can just cut the retainer off the bottom and use window-screen mould to glue on to replace it. Then I use plastic weatherstripping on the bottoms, and they slide like butter.

But my kitchen is 2 Sears toolchests with a maple counter-top laid on top. I HAVE to do my kitchen, and I just do not have the $ to lay out on a decent kitchen fitting to this old house. So I’ve bought Craftsman design principles book, and will be creating it myself. Oh… back to the windows. I’ve got some 5’ cedar logs in the garage that will go through my bandsaw to turn into stock for the windows. I forgot that part.

It’s all part of a (very) mad scheme! And I have only 4 years left before my taxes go up too high to afford to live here! Woo hoo.

And yes, I totally get the desire to move on. I’m 7 1/2 years in on a 10 year project. No social life… just work my day job, then work these projects.

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