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steamed wood?

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Forum topic by BigTiny posted 1477 days ago 689 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BigTiny

1664 posts in 1514 days


1477 days ago

I’ve read several references to “steamed” this wood or that, and for the life of me I just don’t get it? How and why is this done?

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!


6 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5077 posts in 2339 days


#1 posted 1477 days ago

My understanding it is a process by which the wood is heated (generally with steam) to alter the colour of the wood, making it more uniform in contrast/tone so that more of the wood is marketable. I asked this same question here http://lumberjocks.com/topics/3725.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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spclPatrolGroup

216 posts in 1521 days


#2 posted 1477 days ago

it also makes it more pliable, it used to be used back in teh day for ship building, and there are still people who use it to do other projects, generally you take the board out of the steamer and bring ti to a peg board where you have lots of holes to position pegs to bend against and hold it while it coolds off and dries.

-- Dave, from ND "The mind is an infinitely long workbench, and its cluttered with half-finished thoughts and ideas, sometimes we need to clear off the workbench and start again from step one."

View Tony Strupulis's profile

Tony Strupulis

240 posts in 1749 days


#3 posted 1477 days ago

You can’t do this dry…

-- Tony - http://ravensedgetoolworks.com

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Sawmillnc

150 posts in 1680 days


#4 posted 1477 days ago

Steaming is done before the drying process to darken the wood, give it a more uniform appearance and make it look aged.

You can heat the chamber to 212F, 100C for 24 hours to accomplish this with wood that is not refractory ( prone to checking) The chamber must be kept at 100% RH.

I personally find steamed wood to be bland or dull. Air drying and then kiln drying gives a richer color to the wood especially walnut and cherry.

-- Kyle Edwards, http://www.sawmillnc.com, Iron Station , NC (near Charlotte)

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BigTiny

1664 posts in 1514 days


#5 posted 1477 days ago

I was aware of the bending part, and am intending to do some soon as a matter of fact, as the wife wants a celtic drum. It was the colour part that stumped me. Thought it might be similar to fuming or lye treating.
Guess I should have been clearer in my question.
Problem solved. Thanks guys/

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1609 days


#6 posted 1476 days ago

I knew about steaming for forming. I didn’t know about for color. Learned something new today guess that makes me a lucky guy. Thanks guys!

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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