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Construction Ideas For A Thin Framed Picture Frame

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Forum topic by Jim posted 12-08-2016 09:31 PM 765 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim

119 posts in 1499 days


12-08-2016 09:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: picture frame frames framing photography wood miter hardware hanging thin petite

I’m a little stumped on how to do this, though I like the style.

My concerns include how to secure the materials inside the rabbet, attaching hardware for wall hanging, and of course strength of miters.

Thanks for ANY help. Thinking of making a few for christmas.

These are sold on crate and barrel

Jim

-- Jim from Rivertown Woodcraft | Grand Rapids, MI | www.YouTube.com/user/RivertownWoodcraft


7 replies so far

View brtech's profile

brtech

1005 posts in 2759 days


#1 posted 12-08-2016 10:18 PM

How about making them out of solid wood? Make a panel of edge glued boards the size of the outer dimension and route out the interior. Include a ledge to hold the glass, cutouts to put a pin in to hold the glass. Hanging would be easy, because you have a solid back.

If that’s too much, make a typical frame out of maybe 2×3/4 stock, mitered as usual, but routed out to hold the glass and leave the edge. Same idea with cutouts for pins to hold the glass in place.

The trick with the glass holding is you need to undercut the visible part of the edge. Do that before you assemble and a jig can be used with your router to make that cut.

View Marcial's profile

Marcial

135 posts in 382 days


#2 posted 12-09-2016 01:30 AM

My first picture frames were of the skinny (3/4”) variety. The challenge with them is making a sufficiently strong joint. Also skinny frames make for not much room for glass, mat, backing, etc. Finally, to paraphrase Henry Ford II mini frames mean mini profits. A miter joint spline makes the frame much more sturdy

I also used lap joints reinforced with a dowel

Over the years, I came to prefer larger and thicker frames. You can make thin faced frame for aesthetics while thicker sides will add both to the stability and quality of your work.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 757 days


#3 posted 12-09-2016 02:50 AM

Jim,

An idea for retaining the glass, matting, art work, and backer that would avoid the requirement for retainer clips is to set the glass, etc. in a groove rather than a rabbet. A wide board could be grooved on edge, where the groove would be wide enough to accept the glass, etc. The grooved stock would be ripped to width. A removable top rail would allow the glass, etc. to be removed or installed.

The simplest and fastest, although not very elegant, method for hanging the frame on the wall is with the saw-tooth picture hanger attached to the top rail or a pair of eye screwed into the vertical frame members along with a cable. Alternatively a thick piece of wood featuring a through slot (that accepts the picture hanging nail in the wall) could be glued to the frame’s top rail. The thin piece of wood could be face glued to the back of the top rail or let into a shallow recess making the slotted piece of wood set flush with the frame or reduce its projection from the back of the frame.

Since there is not much material with which to work, a mitered half lap joint would be my choice. It is a strong joint and, although I have not made this joint, it looks doable. If you elect to make slots for the glass, etc., the top member of the frame could be secured in place with a pair of short screws. Here is a YouTube video where this joint is made.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CscUFrlinY4

View Jim's profile

Jim

119 posts in 1499 days


#4 posted 12-09-2016 08:44 PM



My first picture frames were of the skinny (3/4”) variety. The challenge with them is making a sufficiently strong joint. Also skinny frames make for not much room for glass, mat, backing, etc. Finally, to paraphrase Henry Ford II mini frames mean mini profits. A miter joint spline makes the frame much more sturdy

I also used lap joints reinforced with a dowel

Over the years, I came to prefer larger and thicker frames. You can make thin faced frame for aesthetics while thicker sides will add both to the stability and quality of your work.

- Marcial

really great, thank you Marcial, I like adding depth to it for added strength!


An idea for retaining the glass, matting, art work, and backer that would avoid the requirement for retainer clips is to set the glass, etc. in a groove rather than a rabbet. A wide board could be grooved on edge, where the groove would be wide enough to accept the glass, etc. The grooved stock would be ripped to width. A removable top rail would allow the glass, etc. to be removed or installed.

Since there is not much material with which to work, a mitered half lap joint would be my choice. It is a strong joint and, although I have not made this joint, it looks doable. If you elect to make slots for the glass, etc., the top member of the frame could be secured in place with a pair of short screws. Here is a YouTube video where this joint is made.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CscUFrlinY4

- JBrow

I also like the half lap idea, and the drop in style, i think that’s what you’re describing.

Thanks everyone! I feel much more prepared to give this aa shot.

Jim

-- Jim from Rivertown Woodcraft | Grand Rapids, MI | www.YouTube.com/user/RivertownWoodcraft

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Jim

119 posts in 1499 days


#5 posted 12-15-2016 03:29 PM

So I ended up going with 3/4”x3/4” segments, and a splined miter. I glued it up last night, and tonight I’ll sand and insert the splines. I’ve gotta get it done by Saturday, buy with a simple wow on poly I should have time.

I also cut glass last night.

Here is a pic around the time of glue up. This might be a pre glue test clamp.

I am definitely interested in trying some half lap joints next

-- Jim from Rivertown Woodcraft | Grand Rapids, MI | www.YouTube.com/user/RivertownWoodcraft

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2781 days


#6 posted 12-17-2016 08:03 PM

Don’t forget that the contents of the frame can add to the strength, and these things are under a load a working item would have to suffer.

If you were to step the rabbits (one for the glass and a wider one for the matting), the matting could be glued or otherwise tacked to the back of the frame.

Also, regarding securing the matting, I use a diamond glass gun and have used them with only a little more than a sixteenth of material to work with.

I think you’d find glue and pin nails (23 gauge) would surprise you, if you haven’t used them.

View Jim's profile

Jim

119 posts in 1499 days


#7 posted 01-16-2017 07:41 PM

Just a quick update. I did this as a 12×12 frame, with 3/4” x 3/4” walnut frame components. With a miter, and miter splines, it was plenty sturdy. I did a 1/4” x 1/4” rabbet, but wish I would have done a 1/2” x 1/4” rabbet to move the photo, mat, and glass forward a bit. But otherwise this worked well.

-- Jim from Rivertown Woodcraft | Grand Rapids, MI | www.YouTube.com/user/RivertownWoodcraft

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