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Tapered Through Tenon

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Forum topic by meischmade posted 12-08-2016 03:38 PM 672 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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meischmade

10 posts in 613 days


12-08-2016 03:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joinery tenon through tenon tapered tenon question wedged tenon

Hey everyone, I’m working on a trio of English Walnut cookies that will be coffee tables and I really want to try some though tenon joints for the base using some walnut dowels. I’ve got Veritas’ reamer and tenon cutter and I think I’ve got the right idea but for a first timer I want to execute it well! Also because these cookies are gorgeous :)

Here are the cookies:

I’ve looked for reference material on wedged through tenons but can’t seem to find anything. I’ll attach some images here for reference. These are from Eric Ervin. Love his stuff. Any help is much appreciated, thanks!

Side note, I’m thinking of using danish oil to finish, any recommendations on a top coat after the oil has cured?

-- meischmade.com


13 replies so far

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2558 posts in 1859 days


#1 posted 12-09-2016 03:26 AM

I’ve never bothered with a top coat on Danish oil (Daly’s). You build it up with several coats. Only the 1st coat gets wet sanded. Of course, it’s not glossy, but has a nice soft appearance and feel.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1499 posts in 1222 days


#2 posted 12-09-2016 05:09 AM

I cannot give you any advice based upon experience but you will want to practice on a scrap where you are drilling through end grain with the reamer. I noticed that all of the above examples and the few pictures on the Lee Valley website appear to be showing side grain.

As for the question regarding a top coat for Danish oil, a top coat isn’t necessary unless you want a finish that is more resistant to water from sweating glasses for example. The Danish oil, once cured, will give you a nice finish without it. If you are shooting for a more durable finish, you can probably skip the Danish oil and use a wiping polyurethane to get a look similar to a hand rubbed Danish oil but with benefit of a poly.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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SignWave

440 posts in 2869 days


#3 posted 12-09-2016 06:16 AM

Please note that the grain orientation in the examples you posted vs. the ‘cookies’ in the first image are in different directions. If you use a tapered or wedged tenon in an end grain hole, don’t be surprised if your cookies crumble. I can’t tell from the photo, but the one in the foreground looks pretty thin, relatively speaking.

You may want to form some sort of frame underneath to hold the legs, and then attach the cookies to the top of the frame, to avoid splitting the cookies. When you attach it, do so in a way that will allow movement.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4510 posts in 973 days


#4 posted 12-09-2016 12:36 PM

As mentioned, you’ve got endgrain top/bottom of your cookies. I wouldn’t use a wedged tenon through endgrain, I’d be scared it would split the top.

I have some short sections of Walnut logs drying on my patio right now. One of them is destined for the same type of thing you’re doing. My plan is to basically build a table with a smaller top made of matching Walnut (regular sawn lumber) then inset that top into the bottom of the cookies. The legs will be blind m/t into the smaller top. I’ll probably drive a couple of screws through oversized holes in the inset top to keep it in place and allow for movement.

Please update this thread as you work on this project. I’d love to see how it turns out and how whatever you decide to do works out!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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JCantin

178 posts in 3246 days


#5 posted 12-09-2016 03:33 PM

If you want the look you could do a faux through tenon. Drill a shallow recess in the top where the tenon would have emerged and inlay a slice of the tenon on the top.

View meischmade's profile

meischmade

10 posts in 613 days


#6 posted 12-09-2016 07:07 PM

Thanks for all the tips everyone, very helpful. For the legs to the base I drilled a hole at 10˚ and tapered the dowel to fit. I didn’t do a through tenon here but I will for the base connectors which will hopefully tie everything up and make it rigid. I’ll post pics of that when I get there.

The base is arranged in a triangle shape. Two in the back and one in the front. The connectors will go across the two back legs and from the middle of that connector to the front leg. If that makes sense. I’m also probably using poor terminology but that’s all I know.

For the finish, I actually tried using wipe on poly over the danish oil with terrible results, even though I waited for a week for the oil to cure. I got blotches in random areas underneath so I sanded down and refinished. I might just leave the finish with multiple coats of danish oil because I like the look and feel but I’m still worried about protection. Anyways, thanks again.

-- meischmade.com

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HokieKen

4510 posts in 973 days


#7 posted 12-09-2016 07:35 PM

Was your Poly oil-based?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View meischmade's profile

meischmade

10 posts in 613 days


#8 posted 12-13-2016 05:20 AM



Was your Poly oil-based?

- HokieKen

It was water based. From what I read, as long as the oil fully cured, using any type of poly was ok. Maybe I didn’t wait long enough? Should I go with an oil-based?

-- meischmade.com

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1423 posts in 1824 days


#9 posted 12-13-2016 12:41 PM

For wipe on application, use oil based. Mix 1:1 with mineral spirits, at least the 1st 2 coats, then go a little thicker if you want. Use WB if spraying. Info on oil and poly.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4510 posts in 973 days


#10 posted 12-13-2016 01:03 PM

I always use oil-based poly and make my own “wipe-on” blend when needed exactly like OSU55 says^

I also always use full gloss poly. There are additives used to change the sheen that sometimes don’t mix well with the MS. If you want a different sheen, apply the desired sheen on the last coat.

I found this quote from an e-mail from Watco in this thread:

“Thank you for your recent e-mail. The only clear coat that can be applied over the Danish Oil is an oil based polyurethane. After 72 hours of applying the Danish Oil, any oil based polyurethane can be applied.”

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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OSU55

1423 posts in 1824 days


#11 posted 12-14-2016 02:02 AM

BTW if you want to use WB over something like Danish oil, let dry, scuff lightly with scotchbrite (steel wool could rust) then wipe down with 1:1 water/denatured alcohol. I don’t recommend it but it can be done. If you’re going to use a wb finish, use a dye for color, not something like Danish oil.

View meischmade's profile

meischmade

10 posts in 613 days


#12 posted 12-29-2016 03:05 AM

Great info, thanks everyone! Update on the table below. Tapered through tenons are seriously tough! I’ve got a lot to learn. Some of the angles are a bit off and I got some serious gaps and blow out.
“Every life a legacy, and every small business a school” :/

-- meischmade.com

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1172 posts in 1632 days


#13 posted 12-29-2016 04:51 AM

It’s very odd looking. I like it!
Good job

Aj

-- Aj

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