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Forum topic by Axle505 posted 12-05-2016 10:24 PM 549 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Axle505

143 posts in 675 days


12-05-2016 10:24 PM

What is the significance of a coffin shape in a plane?

And for that matter, why doesn’t a Krenov or steel plane use one?


7 replies so far

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3355 posts in 3023 days


#1 posted 12-05-2016 10:28 PM

I think it’s just for show. Or maybe it was traditionally used to smooth coffins?

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

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bandit571

18637 posts in 2522 days


#2 posted 12-05-2016 10:41 PM

It is the way they fit your hands, as a squared off one would not.

Some fit the hands better than others….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Sawdustonmyshoulder

446 posts in 3467 days


#3 posted 12-05-2016 10:42 PM

do you smooth the inside or the outside of a coffin? or both?

-- The more skilled you are at something, the worse you are at it when someone is watching.

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bondogaposis

4482 posts in 2190 days


#4 posted 12-05-2016 11:06 PM

I’ve watched Roy Underhill use one to lay out the curve on the bottom board of a coffin. Other than that I’m not sure they are any more useful for making a coffin than any other plane. Here is the link.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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JayT

5455 posts in 2050 days


#5 posted 12-05-2016 11:08 PM


And for that matter, why doesn t a Krenov or steel plane use one?

- Axle505

You could easily make a Krenov style plane with a coffin shape. As for steel, there are infill makers that still use that shape for some of their works, such as these gorgeous Sauer and Steiner pieces.

Or these from Wayne Anderson

I would suppose the reason most don’t is the amount of time involved in working the metal to get the right shape. Since most metal planes have a tote for the hand, they don’t need that coffin shape for comfort. I’m currently working on a new design for a plane that will have a coffin-esque shape and can safely say it’s a pain in the rear to get it right.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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splinter1000

13 posts in 1322 days


#6 posted 12-06-2016 09:01 PM

From what I have read, the coffin shape was employed to provide better stability to the shape ( i.e., flatness) of the plane when subjected to seasonal changes. I think the coffin shape provides more end grain exposure on the sides of the plane allowing the moisture content of the plane to remain more stable throughout the season (take it with a grain of salt when dealing with infill planes which cover the sides and are pinned to the infills).

Regards

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3355 posts in 3023 days


#7 posted 12-06-2016 11:01 PM



From what I have read, the coffin shape was employed to provide better stability to the shape ( i.e., flatness) of the plane when subjected to seasonal changes. I think the coffin shape provides more end grain exposure on the sides of the plane allowing the moisture content of the plane to remain more stable throughout the season (take it with a grain of salt when dealing with infill planes which cover the sides and are pinned to the infills).

Regards

- splinter1000

That’s really interesting, never thought about it like that.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

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